9

I'm working on an accounting script written in Perl and I'm wondering what's the 'proper' way to perform decimal arithmetic calculations. For instance, I want to insure that comparisons like these work correctly:

"0.1" + "0.1" + "0.1" == "0.3"
"258.9" * "2000" == "517800"
...

In Python I'd use the Decimal type for the values, but what do I do in Perl?

  • 3
    Math::BigRat and Math::Decimal would do the trick. – ikegami Dec 21 '15 at 18:53
  • 1
    Remove the quotes from your decimals and integers. – Missaka Wijekoon Dec 21 '15 at 18:54
  • 5
    @Missaka Wijekoon, The quotes are harmless. You're missing the point. Try perl -E'say 0.1 + 0.1 + 0.1 == 0.3 ? "equal" : "not equal"' – ikegami Dec 21 '15 at 18:55
  • 5
    Another very old tactic is to do integer math against the smallest unit. Instead of 0.1 dollars use 10 cents. – tjd Dec 21 '15 at 18:57
  • 4
    Great. Get your input as strings, we all do. You should still know which items are "money" and convert to the smallest appropriate unit. "Cents" for US currency, "eighths of a dollar" for US stock transactions, etc. You should also be very clear about your "rounding" algorithm when playing around with "rates" & "percentages". Don't just "hope for the best". – tjd Dec 21 '15 at 19:08
8

(NOTE: There is Math::Currency but it is currently broken).

Use Math::BigFloat to represent numbers as arbitrary precision objects.

use Math::BigFloat;

print Math::BigFloat->new(0.1) +
      Math::BigFloat->new(0.1) +
      Math::BigFloat->new(0.1) == Math::BigFloat->new(0.3);

You can do this automatically with bignum...

use bignum;

print 0.1 + 0.1 + 0.1 == 0.3;

BUT! the magic only works on numbers. If you try to add strings together it won't work, the magic comes too late. You have to explicitly force them to be numbers. To numify a string you can add 0 to the string, like $a += 0. Or you can force an equation to be done as bignums by starting with 0 + and it will cascade down the line.

use bignum;

$a = "0.1";
$b = "0.1";
$c = "0.1";
$d = "0.3";

# False
print $a + $b + $c == $d;

# True
print 0 + $a + $b + $c == $d;

Two caveats.

First, this all comes at a heavy performance cost. Not only for doing arbitrary precision math, but for all the methods and overloading magic. Benchmark it to see if this is acceptable. Fortunately bignum only upgrades numbers in its scope, not the whole program. It's also safe to use those numbers outside of bignum's scope, any math done with them will also be upgraded.

Second, Decimal will preserve significant figures. Math::BigFloat will not.

  • Math::BigFloat seems to work for me, although it's obviously still floating point arithmetic. I'm surprised there's no core module to do decimal arithmetic. – Eugene Yarmash Dec 21 '15 at 21:09
  • 2
    @engene y, Math::BigRat does lossless arithmetic, and it has been in core since 5.8.0. – ikegami Dec 21 '15 at 21:20
  • 1
    @eugeney It's done with integers under the hood. 0.01 becomes 1 with an exponent of 2. Every arbitrary precision library has to have a limit to its precision else you can very, very easily exhaust memory. For example, 1/3. Python's Decimal stops at 30 places. Math::BigFloat goes out to 40. Math::BigFloat discusses this problem. If you want more precision, use Math::BigRat. It stores fractions as fractions. use bigrat; print 1/3 gives 1/3. – Schwern Dec 21 '15 at 21:30
0

Here's how you might use Math::Decimal for division:

use 5.024003; # use `say'
use Math::Decimal qw( 
                     dec_mul_pow10 
                     dec_neg 
                     dec_rndiv 
                    ); 
my $num_1 = '3'; 
my $num_2 = '7'; 
my $precision = '3'; 

# You want to get three digits after the decimal, 
# so multiply dividend by 1000, divide to get an 
# integer quotient, and then divide that quotient 
# by 1000. 
my $dividend_up_some = dec_mul_pow10( $num_1, $precision ); 
# Rounding by `NEAR_EVN' is "bankers' rounding." 
my $quotient_up_some = 
          dec_rndiv( 'NEAR_EVN', $dividend_up_some, 
                     $num_2 ); 
# Move it back down to get your desired precision after 
# the decimal. 
my $quotient = 
      dec_mul_pow10( $quotient_up_some, 
                     dec_neg( $precision ) ); 
say "$num_1 / $num_2 = $quotient";

Run this program and here is the output:

3 / 7 = 0.429

Change $precision to '10' and here is the output:

3 / 7 = 0.4285714286
-4

Best way I know how is to test with absolute diff being less than a tolerance. For example:

perl -e '$x = 0.1 + 0.1 + 0.1; $y = 0.3; $q = abs($x - $y) < 0.0001 ? "EQUAL" : "NOT EQUAL"; print $q . "\n";'

  • 4
    Use of floating point numbers in an accounting scenario is a remarkably bad idea, not least of which is the accumulation of these round-off errors. – tjd Dec 21 '15 at 19:46
  • You can get the actual epsilon from POSIX.pm. use POSIX qw(DBL_EPSILON); – Schwern Dec 21 '15 at 19:48

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