16

The process of wrapping a class with a decorator causes superclasses to be unable to access that classes' properties. Why?

I have some code that:

  1. Creates a decorator which replaces the constructor of a class with a new constructor that should do the exact same thing.
  2. Creates a base class with a property.
  3. Wraps the base class with the wrapping decorator.
  4. Creates a class that extends the base class.
  5. Tries to access the property on the extended class. This is the part that fails.

Here is the code:

function wrap(target: any) {
  // the new constructor
  var f: any = function (...args) {
      return new target();
  }

  f.prototype = target.prototype;
  return f;
}

@wrap
class Base {
    prop: number = 5;
}

class Extended extends Base {
    constructor() {
        super()
    }
}

var a = new Extended()
console.log(new Extended().prop) // I'm expecting 5 here, but I get undefined.

I'm sure this is some nuance of either prototypes in general or the specific way that TypeScript handles them that I do not grasp.

15

This code works for me:

function logClass(target: any) {
  // save a reference to the original constructor
  var original = target;

  // the new constructor behaviour
  var f : any = function (...args) {
    console.log("New: " + original.name); 
    return  original.apply(this, args)
  }

  // copy prototype so intanceof operator still works
  f.prototype = original.prototype;

  // return new constructor (will override original)
  return f;
}

@logClass
class Base {
    prop: number = 5;
}

class Extended extends Base {
    constructor() {
        super()
    }
}

var b = new Base()
console.log(b.prop)

var a = new Extended()
console.log(a.prop)
  • 10
    Doesn't work for me. Throws this error: TypeError: Class constructor Base cannot be invoked without 'new' – tmuecksch Jan 21 '18 at 13:50
  • 1
    @tmuecksch The code given by TSV and pablorsk work, but not in current (2018-05) jsFiddle, which gives the error you report. Paste our code in a .ts file, compile with tsc, run the generated js file with node, it should work. – PhiLho May 22 '18 at 12:33
  • 1
    It doesn't work in if the target is greater than es5! – Andrei Tătar Sep 20 '18 at 16:42
  • 2
    ES6 will throw the TypeError: Class constructor Base cannot be invoked without 'new' error. Just replace original.apply(this, args) with new original(args) and it should work. – PitchBlackCat Jan 17 '19 at 21:01
  • 1
    should be new original(...args) – Joel Gallant Jan 22 '19 at 4:01
11

This is the more modern approach using the latest TS (3.2.4). The below also uses the decorator factory pattern so you can pass in attributes:

function DecoratorName(attr: any) {
  return function _DecoratorName<T extends {new(...args: any[]): {}}>(constr: T){
    return class extends constr {
      constructor(...args: any[]) {
        super(...args)
        console.log('Did something after the original constructor!')
        console.log('Here is my attribute!', attr.attrName)
      }
    }
  }
}

See here for more info: https://www.typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/decorators.html#class-decorators

  • 1
    Tried this and it works fine unless you're in Angular :( In such a case the constructor args are assumed to be dependencies and so always undefined (even if some args are indeed provided) if this is not an Injectable() class – Javarome Jun 5 '19 at 12:31
  • 1
    @Javarome Yep, if you're trying this on a class that already has a custom decorator like a Component in Angular, then there's a bunch of internal initialization logic that Angular is already doing, so you either have to try to replicate it all in your own custom decorator (not recommended at all, if even possible), or do a workaround like injecting your custom class or composing/constructing your class as a property/member of the Component class. There's not an easy workaround that I know of because of all the logic a framework like Angular has around its own decorators. – etech Jun 5 '19 at 14:15
5

A solution using ES2015 Proxy to override the constructor:

function wrap(target: any) {
  return new Proxy(target, {
    construct(clz, args) {
      console.log(`Constructing ${target.name}`);
      return Reflect.construct(clz, args);
    }
  });
}

@wrap
class Base {
  prop: number = 5;
}

class Extended extends Base {
  constructor() {
    super()
  }
}

var a = new Extended()
console.log(new Extended().prop);

You can also run this on StackBlitz

3

The comments in the other answers complain that code doesn't work.
Actually, it works, but not in jsFiddle...
It is an issue with the code generation in jsFiddle (perhaps using an obsolete version of TypeScript).
The code above works with TypeScript 2.7.2 (run with Node).

So this is basically the code in pablorsk's answer (except there is no need to return the instance), I just added full types to please a stricter TSLint...

function logClass<T extends { new(...args: any[]): {} }>(): any {
    type Ctor = new (...args: any[]) => T;
    return (target: T): Ctor => {
        // Save a reference to the original constructor
        const Original = target;

        // the new constructor behaviour
        let decoratedConstructor: any = function (...args: any[]): void {
            console.log("Before construction:", Original);
            Original.apply(this, args);
            console.log("After construction");
        };

        // Copy prototype so intanceof operator still works
        decoratedConstructor.prototype = Original.prototype;
        // Copy static members too
        Object.keys(Original).forEach((name: string) => { decoratedConstructor[name] = (<any>Original)[name]; });

        // Return new constructor (will override original)
        return decoratedConstructor;
    };
}

@logClass()
class Base {
    prop = 5;
    constructor(value: number) {
        console.log("Base constructor", value);
        this.prop *= value;
    }
    foo() { console.log("Foo", this.prop); }
    static s() { console.log("Static s"); }
}

class Extended extends Base {
    constructor(init: number) {
        super(init);
        console.log("Extended constructor", init);
    }
    bar() { console.log("Bar", this.prop); }
}

const b = new Base(2);
console.log("Base", b instanceof Base);
b.foo();
Base.s();

const e = new Extended(5);
console.log("Extended", e instanceof Base, e instanceof Extended);
e.bar();

[EDIT] Also added a line copying static members, otherwise decorated class throws an error when calling the static method.

2

If you like run code after and before constructor() with a decorator:

function ClassWrapper() {
    return function(target: any) {
        // save a reference to the original constructor
        var original = target;

        // the new constructor behaviour
        var f: any = function (...args) {
            console.log('ClassWrapper: before class constructor', original.name);
            let instance = original.apply(this, args)
            console.log('ClassWrapper: after class constructor', original.name);
            return instance;
        }

        // copy prototype so intanceof operator still works
        f.prototype = original.prototype;

        // return new constructor (will override original)
        return f;
    };
}
@ClassWrapper()
export class ClassExample {
    public constructor() {
        console.info('Running ClassExample constructor...');
    }
}

let example = new ClassExample();

/*
CONSOLE OUTPUT:
ClassWrapper: before class constructor ClassExample
Running ClassExample constructor...
ClassWrapper: after class constructor ClassExample
*/
  • 5
    Doesn't work for me. Throws this exception: TypeError: Class constructor ClassExample cannot be invoked without 'new'. The error is thrown in this line: let instance = original.apply(this, args) – tmuecksch Jan 21 '18 at 13:54

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