129

Kotlin doesn't have the same notion of static fields as used in Java. In Java, the generally accepted way of doing logging is:

public class Foo {
    private static final Logger LOG = LoggerFactory.getLogger(Foo.class);
}

Question is what is the idiomatic way of performing logging in Kotlin?

  • 1
    Not posting this as an answer cause it's far away from the Java way, but I have considered writing an extension function on Any for logging. You need to cache the Loggers of course, but I think this would be a nice way to do it. – mhlz Dec 22 '15 at 14:06
  • 1
    @mhlz Wouldn't that extension function be statically resolved? As in, it wouldn't be applied to all objects, only to those of type Any (thus needing a cast)? – Jire Dec 24 '15 at 23:31
  • 1
    @mhlz an extension function doesn't make sense because it won't have state to keep a logger around. It could be an extension to return a logger, but why have that on every known class in the system? Putting extensions on Any tend to become sloppy noise in the IDE later. @Jire the extension will apply to all descendants of Any, will still return the correct this.javaClass for each. But I'm not recommending it as a solution. – Jayson Minard Dec 25 '15 at 15:40

15 Answers 15

207

In majority of mature Kotlin code, you will find one of these patterns below. The approach using Property Delegates takes advantage of the power of Kotlin to produce the smallest code.

Note: the code here is for java.util.Logging but the same theory applies to any logging library

Static-like (common, equivalent of your Java code in the question)

If you cannot trust in performance of that hash lookup inside the logging system, you can get similar behaviour to your Java code by using a companion object which can hold an instance and feel like a static to you.

class MyClass {
    companion object {
        val LOG = Logger.getLogger(MyClass::class.java.name) 
    }

    fun foo() {
        LOG.warning("Hello from MyClass")
    }
}  

creating output:

Dec 26, 2015 11:28:32 AM org.stackoverflow.kotlin.test.MyClass foo INFO: Hello from MyClass

More on companion objects here: Companion Objects ... Also note that in the sample above MyClass::class.java gets the instance of type Class<MyClass> for the logger, whereas this.javaClass would get the instance of type Class<MyClass.Companion>.

Per Instance of a Class (common)

But, there is really no reason to avoid calling and getting a logger at the instance level. The idiomatic Java way you mentioned is outdated and based on fear of performance, whereas the logger per class is already cached by almost any reasonable logging system on the planet. Just create a member to hold the logger object.

class MyClass {
  val LOG = Logger.getLogger(this.javaClass.name)

  fun foo() {
        LOG.warning("Hello from MyClass")
  }
} 

creating output:

Dec 26, 2015 11:28:44 AM org.stackoverflow.kotlin.test.MyClass foo INFO: Hello from MyClass

You can performance test both per instance and per class variations and see if there is a realistic difference for most apps.

Property Delegates (common, most elegant)

Another approach, which is suggested by @Jire in another answer, is to create a property delegate, which you can then use to do the logic uniformly in any other class that you want. There is a simpler way to do this since Kotlin provides a Lazy delegate already, we can just wrap it in a function. One trick here is that if we want to know the type of the class currently using the delegate, we make it an extension function on any class:

fun <R : Any> R.logger(): Lazy<Logger> {
    return lazy { Logger.getLogger(unwrapCompanionClass(this.javaClass).name) }
}
// see code for unwrapCompanionClass() below in "Putting it all Together section"

This code also makes sure that if you use it in a Companion Object that the logger name will be the same as if you used it on the class itself. Now you can simply:

class Something {
    val LOG by logger()

    fun foo() {
        LOG.info("Hello from Something")
    }
}

for per class instance, or if you want it to be more static with one instance per class:

class SomethingElse {
    companion object {
        val LOG by logger()

    }

    fun foo() {
        LOG.info("Hello from SomethingElse")
    }
}

And your output from calling foo() on both of these classes would be:

Dec 26, 2015 11:30:55 AM org.stackoverflow.kotlin.test.Something foo INFO: Hello from Something

Dec 26, 2015 11:30:55 AM org.stackoverflow.kotlin.test.SomethingElse foo INFO: Hello from SomethingElse

Extension Functions (uncommon in this case because of "pollution" of Any namespace)

Kotlin has a few hidden tricks that let you make some of this code even smaller. You can create extension functions on classes and therefore give them additional functionality. One suggestion in the comments above was to extend Any with a logger function. This can create noise anytime someone uses code-completion in their IDE on any class. But there is a secret benefit to extending Any or some other marker interface: you can imply that you are extending your own class and therefore detect the class you are within. Huh? To be less confusing, here is the code:

// extend any class with the ability to get a logger
fun <T: Any> T.logger(): Logger {
     return Logger.getLogger(unwrapCompanionClass(this.javaClass).name)
}

Now within a class (or companion object) I can simply call this extension on my own class:

class SomethingDifferent {
    val LOG = logger()

    fun foo() {
        LOG.info("Hello from SomethingDifferent")
    }
}

Producing output:

Dec 26, 2015 11:29:12 AM org.stackoverflow.kotlin.test.SomethingDifferent foo INFO: Hello from SomethingDifferent

Basically, the code is seen as a call to extension Something.logger(). The problem is that the following could also be true creating "pollution" on other classes:

val LOG1 = "".logger()
val LOG2 = Date().logger()
val LOG3 = 123.logger()

Extension Functions on Marker Interface (not sure how common, but common model for "traits")

To make the use of extensions cleaner and reduce "pollution", you could use a marker interface to extend:

interface Loggable {} 

fun Loggable.logger(): Logger {
     return Logger.getLogger(unwrapCompanionClass(this.javaClass).name)
}    

Or even make the method part of the interface with a default implementation:

interface Loggable {
    public fun logger(): Logger {
        return Logger.getLogger(unwrapCompanionClass(this.javaClass).name)
    }
}

And use either of these variations in your class:

class MarkedClass: Loggable {
    val LOG = logger()
}

Producing output:

Dec 26, 2015 11:41:01 AM org.stackoverflow.kotlin.test.MarkedClass foo INFO: Hello from MarkedClass

If you wanted to force the creation of a uniform field to hold the logger, then while using this interface you could easily require the implementer to have a field such as LOG:

interface Loggable {
    val LOG: Logger  // abstract required field

    public fun logger(): Logger {
        return Logger.getLogger(unwrapCompanionClass(this.javaClass).name)
    }
}

Now the implementer of the interface must look like this:

class MarkedClass: Loggable {
    override val LOG: Logger = logger()
}

Of course an abstract base class can do the same, having the option of both the interface and an abstract class implementing that interface allows flexibility and uniformity:

abstract class WithLogging: Loggable {
    override val LOG: Logger = logger()
}

// using the logging from the base class
class MyClass1: WithLogging() {
    // ... already has logging!
}

// providing own logging compatible with marker interface
class MyClass2: ImportantBaseClass(), Loggable {
    // ... has logging that we can understand, but doesn't change my hierarchy
    override val LOG: Logger = logger()
}

// providing logging from the base class via a companion object so our class hierarchy is not affected
class MyClass3: ImportantBaseClass() {
    companion object : WithLogging() {
       // we have the LOG property now!
    }
}

Putting it All Together (A small helper library)

Here is a small helper library to make any of the options above easy to use. It is common in Kotlin to extend API's to make them more to your liking. Either in extension or top-level functions. Here is a mix to give you options for how to create loggers, and a sample showing all variations:

// Return logger for Java class, if companion object fix the name
fun <T: Any> logger(forClass: Class<T>): Logger {
    return Logger.getLogger(unwrapCompanionClass(forClass).name)
}

// unwrap companion class to enclosing class given a Java Class
fun <T : Any> unwrapCompanionClass(ofClass: Class<T>): Class<*> { 
   return ofClass.enclosingClass?.takeIf { 
      ofClass.enclosingClass.kotlin.companionObject?.java == ofClass 
   } ?: ofClass 
}

// unwrap companion class to enclosing class given a Kotlin Class
fun <T: Any> unwrapCompanionClass(ofClass: KClass<T>): KClass<*> {
   return unwrapCompanionClass(ofClass.java).kotlin
}

// Return logger for Kotlin class
fun <T: Any> logger(forClass: KClass<T>): Logger {
    return logger(forClass.java)
}

// return logger from extended class (or the enclosing class)
fun <T: Any> T.logger(): Logger {
    return logger(this.javaClass)
}

// return a lazy logger property delegate for enclosing class
fun <R : Any> R.lazyLogger(): Lazy<Logger> {
    return lazy { logger(this.javaClass) }
}

// return a logger property delegate for enclosing class
fun <R : Any> R.injectLogger(): Lazy<Logger> {
    return lazyOf(logger(this.javaClass))
}

// marker interface and related extension (remove extension for Any.logger() in favour of this)
interface Loggable {}
fun Loggable.logger(): Logger = logger(this.javaClass)

// abstract base class to provide logging, intended for companion objects more than classes but works for either
abstract class WithLogging: Loggable {
    val LOG = logger()
}

Pick whichever of those you want to keep, and here are all of the options in use:

class MixedBagOfTricks {
    companion object {
        val LOG1 by lazyLogger()          // lazy delegate, 1 instance per class
        val LOG2 by injectLogger()        // immediate, 1 instance per class
        val LOG3 = logger()               // immediate, 1 instance per class
        val LOG4 = logger(this.javaClass) // immediate, 1 instance per class
    }

    val LOG5 by lazyLogger()              // lazy delegate, 1 per instance of class
    val LOG6 by injectLogger()            // immediate, 1 per instance of class
    val LOG7 = logger()                   // immediate, 1 per instance of class
    val LOG8 = logger(this.javaClass)     // immediate, 1 instance per class
}

val LOG9 = logger(MixedBagOfTricks::class)  // top level variable in package

// or alternative for marker interface in class
class MixedBagOfTricks : Loggable {
    val LOG10 = logger()
}

// or alternative for marker interface in companion object of class
class MixedBagOfTricks {
    companion object : Loggable {
        val LOG11 = logger()
    }
}

// or alternative for abstract base class for companion object of class
class MixedBagOfTricks {
    companion object: WithLogging() {} // instance 12

    fun foo() {
       LOG.info("Hello from MixedBagOfTricks")
    }
}

// or alternative for abstract base class for our actual class
class MixedBagOfTricks : WithLogging() { // instance 13
    fun foo() {
       LOG.info("Hello from MixedBagOfTricks")
    }
}

All 13 instances of the loggers created in this sample will produce the same logger name, and output:

Dec 26, 2015 11:39:00 AM org.stackoverflow.kotlin.test.MixedBagOfTricks foo INFO: Hello from MixedBagOfTricks

Note: The unwrapCompanionClass() method ensures that we do not generate a logger named after the companion object but rather the enclosing class. This is the current recommended way to find the class containing the companion object. Stripping "$Companion" from the name using removeSuffix() does not work since companion objects can be given custom names.

  • 7
    Thanks for the extensive answer. Very informative. I particularly like the Property Delegates (common, most elegant) implementation. – mchlstckl Dec 26 '15 at 17:10
  • 5
    I think there was a change in kotlin syntax. and the unwrap should be ofClass.enclosingClass.kotlin.objectInstance?.javaClass instead of ofClass.enclosingClass.kotlin.companionObject?.java – oshai Feb 27 '16 at 20:14
  • 1
    ok I found it, it is import kotlin.reflect.companionObject – oshai Feb 29 '16 at 7:43
  • 1
    ah, never mind, as stated here kotlinlang.org/docs/reference/reflection.html the reflect jar is shipped separately from the stdlib, for gradle we need this: compile 'org.jetbrains.kotlin:kotlin-reflect:1.0.2' – Hoang Tran Jun 12 '16 at 7:36
  • 1
    The code for creating the 'Property Delegates' and the 'Extension Functions' appear to be the same except for the return type. The code sample for the Property Delegate (public fun <R : Any> R.logger(): Lazy<Logger> { return lazy{Logger.getLogger(unwrapCompanionClass(this.javaClass).name)}}) appears to create an extension function such that "".logger() is now a thing, is this supposed behave this way? – Mike Rylander Sep 20 '17 at 14:49
25

Have a look at the kotlin-logging library.
It allows logging like that:

private val logger = KotlinLogging.logger {}

class Foo {
  logger.info{"wohoooo $wohoooo"}
}

Or like that:

class FooWithLogging {
  companion object: KLogging()
  fun bar() {
    logger.info{"wohoooo $wohoooo"}
  }
}

I also wrote a blog post comparing it to AnkoLogger: Logging in Kotlin & Android: AnkoLogger vs kotlin-logging

Disclaimer: I am the maintainer of that library.

Edit: kotlin-logging now has multiplatform support: https://github.com/MicroUtils/kotlin-logging/wiki/Multiplatform-support

7

As a good example of logging implementation I'd like to mention Anko which uses a special interface AnkoLogger which a class that needs logging should implement. Inside the interface there's code that generates a logging tag for the class. Logging is then done via extension functions which can be called inside the interace implementation without prefixes or even logger instance creation.

I don't think this is idiomatic, but it seems a good approach as it requires minimum code, just adding the interface to a class declaration, and you get logging with different tags for different classes.


The code below is basically AnkoLogger, simplified and rewritten for Android-agnostic usage.

First, there's an interface which behaves like a marker interface:

interface MyLogger {
    val tag: String get() = javaClass.simpleName
}

It lets its implementation use the extensions functions for MyLogger inside their code just calling them on this. And it also contains logging tag.

Next, there is a general entry point for different logging methods:

private inline fun log(logger: MyLogger,
                       message: Any?,
                       throwable: Throwable?,
                       level: Int,
                       handler: (String, String) -> Unit,
                       throwableHandler: (String, String, Throwable) -> Unit
) {
    val tag = logger.tag
    if (isLoggingEnabled(tag, level)) {
        val messageString = message?.toString() ?: "null"
        if (throwable != null)
            throwableHandler(tag, messageString, throwable)
        else
            handler(tag, messageString)
    }
}

It will be called by logging methods. It gets a tag from MyLogger implementation, checks logging settings and then calls one of two handlers, the one with Throwable argument and the one without.

Then you can define as many logging methods as you like, in this way:

fun MyLogger.info(message: Any?, throwable: Throwable? = null) =
        log(this, message, throwable, LoggingLevels.INFO,
            { tag, message -> println("INFO: $tag # $message") },
            { tag, message, thr -> 
                println("INFO: $tag # $message # $throwable");
                thr.printStackTrace()
            })

These are defined once for both logging just a message and logging a Throwable as well, this is done with optional throwable parameter.

The functions that are passed as handler and throwableHandler can be different for different logging methods, for example, they can write the log to file or upload it somewhere. isLoggingEnabled and LoggingLevels are omitted for brevity, but using them provides even more flexibility.


It allows for the following usage:

class MyClass : MyLogger {
    fun myFun() {
        info("Info message")
    }
}

There is a small drawback: a logger object will be needed for logging in package-level functions:

private object MyPackageLog : MyLogger

fun myFun() {
    MyPackageLog.info("Info message")
}
  • This answer is Android specific, and the question did not mention nor have an Android tag. – Jayson Minard Dec 25 '15 at 12:01
  • @JaysonMinard why is it? This approach is general purpose since, for example, having an unique logging tag for every class is useful in non-Android projects as well. – hotkey Dec 25 '15 at 15:10
  • 1
    It isn't clear you are saying "implement something similar to what Anko did" and instead seems more like "use Anko" ... which then requires an Android library called Anko. Which has an interface that has extension functions that call android.util.Log to do logging. Which was your intent? use Anko? Of build something similar while using Anko as an example (it is better if you just put the suggested code inline and fix it for non-Android instead of saying "port this to non-Android, here's the link". Instead you add sample code calling Anko) – Jayson Minard Dec 25 '15 at 15:33
  • 1
    @JaysonMinard, thanks for your comments, I've rewritten the post so that it now explains the approach rather than references Anko. – hotkey Dec 25 '15 at 21:55
6

KISS: For Java Teams Migrating to Kotlin

If you don't mind providing the class name on each instantiation of the logger (just like java), you can keep it simple by defining this as a top-level function somewhere in your project:

import org.slf4j.LoggerFactory

inline fun <reified T:Any> logger() = LoggerFactory.getLogger(T::class.java)

This uses a Kotlin reified type parameter.

Now, you can use this as follows:

class SomeClass {
  // or within a companion object for one-instance-per-class
  val log = logger<SomeClass>()
  ...
}

This approach is super-simple and close to the java equivalent, but just adds some syntactical sugar.

Next Step: Extensions or Delegates

I personally prefer going one step further and using the extensions or delegates approach. This is nicely summarized in @JaysonMinard's answer, but here is the TL;DR for the "Delegate" approach with the log4j2 API (UPDATE: no need to write this code manually any more, as it has been released as an official module of the log4j2 project, see below). Since log4j2, unlike slf4j, supports logging with Supplier's, I've also added a delegate to make using these methods simpler.

import org.apache.logging.log4j.LogManager
import org.apache.logging.log4j.Logger
import org.apache.logging.log4j.util.Supplier
import kotlin.reflect.companionObject

/**
 * An adapter to allow cleaner syntax when calling a logger with a Kotlin lambda. Otherwise calling the
 * method with a lambda logs the lambda itself, and not its evaluation. We specify the Lambda SAM type as a log4j2 `Supplier`
 * to avoid this. Since we are using the log4j2 api here, this does not evaluate the lambda if the level
 * is not enabled.
 */
class FunctionalLogger(val log: Logger): Logger by log {
  inline fun debug(crossinline supplier: () -> String) {
    log.debug(Supplier { supplier.invoke() })
  }

  inline fun debug(t: Throwable, crossinline supplier: () -> String) {
    log.debug(Supplier { supplier.invoke() }, t)
  }

  inline fun info(crossinline supplier: () -> String) {
    log.info(Supplier { supplier.invoke() })
  }

  inline fun info(t: Throwable, crossinline supplier: () -> String) {
    log.info(Supplier { supplier.invoke() }, t)
  }

  inline fun warn(crossinline supplier: () -> String) {
    log.warn(Supplier { supplier.invoke() })
  }

  inline fun warn(t: Throwable, crossinline supplier: () -> String) {
    log.warn(Supplier { supplier.invoke() }, t)
  }

  inline fun error(crossinline supplier: () -> String) {
    log.error(Supplier { supplier.invoke() })
  }

  inline fun error(t: Throwable, crossinline supplier: () -> String) {
    log.error(Supplier { supplier.invoke() }, t)
  }
}

/**
 * A delegate-based lazy logger instantiation. Use: `val log by logger()`.
 */
@Suppress("unused")
inline fun <reified T : Any> T.logger(): Lazy<FunctionalLogger> =
  lazy { FunctionalLogger(LogManager.getLogger(unwrapCompanionClass(T::class.java))) }

// unwrap companion class to enclosing class given a Java Class
fun <T : Any> unwrapCompanionClass(ofClass: Class<T>): Class<*> {
  return if (ofClass.enclosingClass != null && ofClass.enclosingClass.kotlin.companionObject?.java == ofClass) {
    ofClass.enclosingClass
  } else {
    ofClass
  }
}

Log4j2 Kotlin Logging API

Most of the previous section has been directly adapted to produce the Kotlin Logging API module, which is now an official part of Log4j2 (disclaimer: I am the primary author). You can download this directly from Apache, or via Maven Central.

Usage is basically as describe above, but the module supports both interface-based logger access, a logger extension function on Any for use where this is defined, and a named logger function for use where no this is defined (such as top-level functions).

  • 1
    If I'm right, you're able to avoid typing out the class name in the first solution you provided by changing the method signature to T.logger() – IPat Mar 14 '18 at 16:04
  • 1
    @IPat yup, the first solution intentionally does not do that to remain close to the "java way". The second part of the answer covers the extension case T.logger() -- see the bottom of the code sample. – Raman Mar 14 '18 at 22:12
4

Would something like this work for you?

class LoggerDelegate {

    private var logger: Logger? = null

    operator fun getValue(thisRef: Any?, property: KProperty<*>): Logger {
        if (logger == null) logger = Logger.getLogger(thisRef!!.javaClass.name)
        return logger!!
    }

}

fun logger() = LoggerDelegate()

class Foo { // (by the way, everything in Kotlin is public by default)
    companion object { val logger by logger() }
}
  • 1
    This answer needs more explanation, if the person asking doesn't understand companion objects, they probably haven't gotten to delegates, and therefore won't know what this is doing. Plus there is very little savings in code using this model. And I doubt the caching in the companion object is really a performance gain other than in a restricted system with small CPU such as Android. – Jayson Minard Dec 25 '15 at 12:10
  • 1
    What this code above is showing is the creation of a class that acts as a Delegate (see kotlinlang.org/docs/reference/delegated-properties.html) which is the first class LoggerDelegate And then it is creating a top level function that is making it easier to create an instance of the delegate (not much easier, but a little). And that function should be changed to be inline. Then it uses the delegate to provide a logger whenever one is desired. But it provides one for the companion Foo.Companion and not for the class Foo so is maybe not as intended. – Jayson Minard Dec 25 '15 at 12:20
  • @JaysonMinard I agree but I'll leave the answer up for future viewers who want a "quick fix" or an example of how to apply this to their own projects. I don't understand why the logger() function should be inline if no lambdas are present. IntelliJ suggests inlining in this case is unnecessary: i.imgur.com/YQH3NB1.png – Jire Dec 26 '15 at 10:06
  • you're right, the inline is overkill. – Jayson Minard Dec 26 '15 at 12:59
  • 1
    I incorporated your answer into mine, and simplified it by removing the custom delegate class and used a wrapper around Lazy instead. With a trick to get it to know what class it is within. – Jayson Minard Dec 26 '15 at 13:39
4

Anko

You can use Anko library to do it. You would have code like below:

class MyActivity : Activity(), AnkoLogger {
    private fun someMethod() {
        info("This is my first app and it's awesome")
        debug(1234) 
        warn("Warning")
    }
}

kotlin-logging

kotlin-logging(Github project - kotlin-logging ) library allows you to write logging code like below:

class FooWithLogging {
  companion object: KLogging()
  fun bar() {
    logger.info{"Item $item"}
  }
}

StaticLog

or you can also use this small written in Kotlin library called StaticLog then your code would looks like:

Log.info("This is an info message")
Log.debug("This is a debug message")
Log.warn("This is a warning message","WithACustomTag")
Log.error("This is an error message with an additional Exception for output", "AndACustomTag", exception )

Log.logLevel = LogLevel.WARN
Log.info("This message will not be shown")\

The second solution might better if you would like to define an output format for logging method like:

Log.newFormat {
    line(date("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss"), space, level, text("/"), tag, space(2), message, space(2), occurrence)
}

or use filters, for example:

Log.filterTag = "filterTag"
Log.info("This log will be filtered out", "otherTag")
Log.info("This log has the right tag", "filterTag")

timberkt

If you'd already used Jake Wharton's Timber logging library check timberkt.

This library builds on Timber with an API that's easier to use from Kotlin. Instead of using formatting parameters, you pass a lambda that is only evaluated if the message is logged.

Code example:

// Standard timber
Timber.d("%d %s", intVar + 3, stringFun())

// Kotlin extensions
Timber.d { "${intVar + 3} ${stringFun()}" }
// or
d { "${intVar + 3} ${stringFun()}" }

Check also: Logging in Kotlin & Android: AnkoLogger vs kotlin-logging

Hope it will help

1

I have heard of no idiom in this regard. The simpler the better, so I would use a top-level property

val logger = Logger.getLogger("package_name")

This practice serves well in Python, and as different as Kotlin and Python might appear, I believe they are quite similar in there "spirit" (speaking of idioms).

  • Top-level is also known as package-level. – Caelum Dec 22 '15 at 14:12
  • A top level variable is like saying "use global variables" and I think would only be applicable if you had other top level functions that needed to use a logger. At that point though, it might be better to pass in a logger to any utility function that wants to log. – Jayson Minard Dec 25 '15 at 12:02
  • @JaysonMinard I think passing logger as a parameter would be an anti-pattern, because your logging should never affect your API, external or internal – voddan Dec 25 '15 at 12:09
  • Ok, then back to my point, for class level logging put the logger in the class, not a top level function. – Jayson Minard Dec 25 '15 at 12:15
  • 1
    @voddan at least provide a complete example of what type of logger you are creating. val log = what?!? ... creating a logger by name? Ignoring the fact the question showed he was wanting to create a logger for a specific class LoggerFactory.getLogger(Foo.class); – Jayson Minard Dec 26 '15 at 4:24
1

What about an extension function on Class instead? That way you end up with:

public fun KClass.logger(): Logger = LoggerFactory.getLogger(this.java)

class SomeClass {
    val LOG = SomeClass::class.logger()
}

Note - I've not tested this at all, so it might not be quite right.

1

First, you can add extension functions for logger creation.

inline fun <reified T : Any> getLogger() = LoggerFactory.getLogger(T::class.java)
fun <T : Any> T.getLogger() = LoggerFactory.getLogger(javaClass)

Then you will be able to create a logger using the following code.

private val logger1 = getLogger<SomeClass>()
private val logger2 = getLogger()

Second, you can define an interface that provides a logger and its mixin implementation.

interface LoggerAware {
  val logger: Logger
}

class LoggerAwareMixin(containerClass: Class<*>) : LoggerAware {
  override val logger: Logger = LoggerFactory.getLogger(containerClass)
}

inline fun <reified T : Any> loggerAware() = LoggerAwareMixin(T::class.java)

This interface can be used in the following way.

class SomeClass : LoggerAware by loggerAware<SomeClass>() {
  // Now you can use a logger here.
}
1

create companion object and mark the appropriate fields with @JvmStatic annotation

0

That's what companion objects are for, in general: replacing static stuff.

  • A companion object is not a static, it is a singleton that can hold members which may become static if you use JvmStatic annotation. And in the future there may be more than one allowed. Plus this answer isn't very helpful without more information or a sample. – Jayson Minard Dec 25 '15 at 12:03
  • I didn't say it was a static. I said it was for replacing statics. And why would there be more than one allowed? That doesn't make sense. Lastly, I was in a hurry, and I thought that pointing in the right direction would be helpful enough. – Jacob Zimmerman Dec 29 '15 at 6:33
  • 1
    A companion object isn't for replacing statics, but it can also make elements of it static. Kotlin supported more than on companion for a time, and allows them to have other names. Once you start naming them they act less like statics. And it is left open in the future to have more than one named companion. For example, one might be Factory and another Helpers – Jayson Minard Dec 29 '15 at 14:34
0

Slf4j example, same for others. This even works for creating package level logger

/**  
  * Get logger by current class name.  
  */ 

fun getLogger(c: () -> Unit): Logger = 
        LoggerFactory.getLogger(c.javaClass.enclosingClass)

Usage:

val logger = getLogger { }
0
fun <R : Any> R.logger(): Lazy<Logger> = lazy { 
    LoggerFactory.getLogger((if (javaClass.kotlin.isCompanion) javaClass.enclosingClass else javaClass).name) 
}

class Foo {
    val logger by logger()
}

class Foo {
    companion object {
        val logger by logger()
    }
}
0

There are many great answers here already, but all of them concern adding a logger to a class, but how would you do that to do logging in Top Level Functions?

This approach is generic and simple enough to work well in both classes, companion objects and Top Level Functions:

package nieldw.test

import org.apache.logging.log4j.LogManager
import org.apache.logging.log4j.Logger
import org.junit.jupiter.api.Test

fun logger(lambda: () -> Unit): Lazy<Logger> = lazy { LogManager.getLogger(getClassName(lambda.javaClass)) }
private fun <T : Any> getClassName(clazz: Class<T>): String = clazz.name.replace(Regex("""\$.*$"""), "")

val topLog by logger { }

class TopLevelLoggingTest {
    val classLog by logger { }

    @Test
    fun `What is the javaClass?`() {
        topLog.info("THIS IS IT")
        classLog.info("THIS IS IT")
    }
}
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This is still WIP (almost finished) so I'd like to share it: https://github.com/leandronunes85/log-format-enforcer#kotlin-soon-to-come-in-version-14

The main goal of this library is to enforce a certain log style across a project. By having it generate Kotlin code I'm trying to address some of the issues mentioned in this question. With regards to the original question what I usually tend to do is to simply:

private val LOG = LogFormatEnforcer.loggerFor<Foo>()
class Foo {

}

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