319

I have a relatively straightforward issue of trying to add inline scripting to a React component. What I have so far:

'use strict';

import '../../styles/pages/people.scss';

import React, { Component } from 'react';
import DocumentTitle from 'react-document-title';

import { prefix } from '../../core/util';

export default class extends Component {
    render() {
        return (
            <DocumentTitle title="People">
                <article className={[prefix('people'), prefix('people', 'index')].join(' ')}>
                    <h1 className="tk-brandon-grotesque">People</h1>

                    <script src="https://use.typekit.net/foobar.js"></script>
                    <script dangerouslySetInnerHTML={{__html: 'try{Typekit.load({ async: true });}catch(e){}'}}></script>
                </article>
            </DocumentTitle>
        );
    }
};

I have also tried:

<script src="https://use.typekit.net/foobar.js"></script>
<script>try{Typekit.load({ async: true });}catch(e){}</script>

Neither approach seems to execute the desired script. I'm guessing it's a simple thing I'm missing. Can anybody help out?

PS: Ignore the foobar, I have a real id actually in use that I didn't feel like sharing.

  • 5
    Is there specific motivation for loading this via React instead of including it in your base page HTML? Even if this did work, it would mean you would be re-inserting a script every time the component mounted. – loganfsmyth Dec 22 '15 at 21:54
  • Is that the case? I assumed DOM diffing would make that not the case, but I admit it would depend on the implementation of DocumentTitle. – loganfsmyth Dec 22 '15 at 22:12
  • 11
    Correct @loganfsmyth, React will not reload the script on re-render if the next state also has the script. – Max May 22 '16 at 18:55

17 Answers 17

491

Edit: Things change fast and this is outdated - see update


Do you want to fetch and execute the script again and again, every time this component is rendered, or just once when this component is mounted into the DOM?

Perhaps try something like this:

componentDidMount () {
    const script = document.createElement("script");

    script.src = "https://use.typekit.net/foobar.js";
    script.async = true;

    document.body.appendChild(script);
}

However, this is only really helpful if the script you want to load isn't available as a module/package. First, I would always:

  • Look for the package on npm
  • Download and install the package in my project (npm install typekit)
  • import the package where I need it (import Typekit from 'typekit';)

This is likely how you installed the packages react and react-document-title from your example, and there is a Typekit package available on npm.


Update:

Now that we have hooks, a better approach might be to use useEffect like so:

useEffect(() => {
  const script = document.createElement('script');

  script.src = "https://use.typekit.net/foobar.js";
  script.async = true;

  document.body.appendChild(script);

  return () => {
    document.body.removeChild(script);
  }
}, []);

Which makes it a great candidate for a custom hook (eg: hooks/useScript.js):

import { useEffect } from 'react';

const useScript = url => {
  useEffect(() => {
    const script = document.createElement('script');

    script.src = url;
    script.async = true;

    document.body.appendChild(script);

    return () => {
      document.body.removeChild(script);
    }
  }, [url]);
};

export default useScript;

Which can be used like so:

import useScript from 'hooks/useScript';

const MyComponent = props => {
  useScript('https://use.typekit.net/foobar.js');

  // rest of your component
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    I decided that the "advanced" implementation from TypeKit was more suitable to this approach. – ArrayKnight Dec 22 '15 at 22:19
  • 16
    This does work - to load the script, but how can I get access to the code in the script. For example, I'd like to call a function that lives inside the script, but I'm not able to invoke it inside the component where the script is loaded. – zero_cool Oct 11 '16 at 19:45
  • 2
    When the script is appended to the page it will be executed as normal. For example, if you used this method to download jQuery from a CDN, then after the componentDidMount function had downloaded and appended the script to the page, you will have the jQuery and $ objects available globally (ie: on window). – Alex McMillan Oct 11 '16 at 19:59
  • 2
    I had a similar problem using an authentication script and turned out that it might be better to include it in the html file of the root a layer above your react App.js. In case anyone finds this useful. As @loganfsmith mentioned... – devssh Jan 9 '18 at 14:55
  • 1
    @zero_cool if script loaded, function can called with window property ex) if (window.whatYouLoadedFunction) { window.whatYouLoadedFunction() } – Sacru2red Nov 6 at 6:37
64

Further to the answers above you can do this:

import React from 'react';

export default class Test extends React.Component {
  constructor(props) {
    super(props);
  }

  componentDidMount() {
    const s = document.createElement('script');
    s.type = 'text/javascript';
    s.async = true;
    s.innerHTML = "document.write('This is output by document.write()!')";
    this.instance.appendChild(s);
  }

  render() {
    return <div ref={el => (this.instance = el)} />;
  }
}

The div is bound to this and the script is injected into it.

Demo can be found on codesandbox.io

| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    this.instance didn't work for me, but document.body.appendChild did from Alex McMillan's answer. – What Would Be Cool Jul 19 '17 at 17:31
  • 6
    You probably didn't bind this.instance to the ref inside your render method. I've added a demo link to show it working – sidonaldson Jul 21 '17 at 9:27
  • 1
    @ShubhamKushwah You must be doing server side rendering? – ArrayKnight May 7 '19 at 16:00
  • @ArrayKnight yes I found out later that on the server these objects don't exist: document, window. So I prefer using the npm global package – Shubham Kushwah May 12 '19 at 15:02
  • what is the need for s.async = true, i can't find any reference about it, to know it's purpose, can you explain it – sasha romanov Jul 24 '19 at 2:23
59

My favorite way is to use React Helmet – it's a component that allows for easy manipulation of the document head in a way you're probably already used to.

e.g.

import React from "react";
import {Helmet} from "react-helmet";

class Application extends React.Component {
  render () {
    return (
        <div className="application">
            <Helmet>
                <script src="https://use.typekit.net/foobar.js"></script>
                <script>try{Typekit.load({ async: true });}catch(e){}</script>
            </Helmet>
            ...
        </div>
    );
  }
};

https://github.com/nfl/react-helmet

| improve this answer | |
  • 6
    This is by far the best solution. – paqash Jul 25 '18 at 14:29
  • 4
    Unfortunately, it is not working... See codesandbox.io/s/l9qmrwxqzq – Darkowic Dec 6 '18 at 11:05
  • 2
    @Darkowic, I got your code to work by adding async="true" to the <script> tag that added jQuery to the code. – Soma Mbadiwe Feb 1 '19 at 5:06
  • @SomaMbadiwe why it works with async=true and fails without it? – Webwoman Apr 9 '19 at 19:37
  • 3
    Tried this, doesn't work for me. I wouldn't recommend using react-helmet for the sole reason that it injects extra properties into the script that can't be removed. This actually break certain scripts, and the maintainers haven't fixed it in years, and refuse to github.com/nfl/react-helmet/issues/79 – Philberg Jun 14 '19 at 16:13
20

If you need to have <script> block in SSR (server-side rendering), an approach with componentDidMount will not work.

You can use react-safe library instead. The code in React will be:

import Safe from "react-safe"

// in render 
<Safe.script src="https://use.typekit.net/foobar.js"></Safe.script>
<Safe.script>{
  `try{Typekit.load({ async: true });}catch(e){}`
}
</Safe.script>
| improve this answer | |
13

The answer Alex Mcmillan provided helped me the most but didn't quite work for a more complex script tag.

I slightly tweaked his answer to come up with a solution for a long tag with various functions that was additionally already setting "src".

(For my use case the script needed to live in head which is reflected here as well):

  componentWillMount () {
      const script = document.createElement("script");

      const scriptText = document.createTextNode("complex script with functions i.e. everything that would go inside the script tags");

      script.appendChild(scriptText);
      document.head.appendChild(script);
  }
| improve this answer | |
  • 7
    I don't understand why you'd use React at all if you're just dumping inline JS onto the page... ? – Alex McMillan Jan 22 '18 at 23:42
  • 2
    you need to add document.head.removeChild(script); in your code, or you will create infinite number of script tag at your html as long as user visits this page route – sasha romanov Jul 24 '19 at 2:27
8

I created a React component for this specific case: https://github.com/coreyleelarson/react-typekit

Just need to pass in your Typekit Kit ID as a prop and you're good to go.

import React from 'react';
import Typekit from 'react-typekit';

const HtmlLayout = () => (
  <html>
    <body>
      <h1>My Example React Component</h1>
      <Typekit kitId="abc123" />
    </body>
  </html>
);

export default HtmlLayout;
| improve this answer | |
7

You can also use react helmet

import React from "react";
import {Helmet} from "react-helmet";

class Application extends React.Component {
  render () {
    return (
        <div className="application">
            <Helmet>
                <meta charSet="utf-8" />
                <title>My Title</title>
                <link rel="canonical" href="http://example.com/example" />
                <script src="/path/to/resource.js" type="text/javascript" />
            </Helmet>
            ...
        </div>
    );
  }
};

Helmet takes plain HTML tags and outputs plain HTML tags. It's dead simple, and React beginner friendly.

| improve this answer | |
5

There is a very nice workaround using Range.createContextualFragment.

/**
 * Like React's dangerouslySetInnerHTML, but also with JS evaluation.
 * Usage:
 *   <div ref={setDangerousHtml.bind(null, html)}/>
 */
function setDangerousHtml(html, el) {
    if(el === null) return;
    const range = document.createRange();
    range.selectNodeContents(el);
    range.deleteContents();
    el.appendChild(range.createContextualFragment(html));
}

This works for arbitrary HTML and also retains context information such as document.currentScript.

| improve this answer | |
  • Could you collaborate how is it expected to work please, with usage sample? For me it is not working with passing script and body for example.. – Alex Efimov Jun 2 at 18:06
4

You can use npm postscribe to load script in react component

postscribe('#mydiv', '<script src="https://use.typekit.net/foobar.js"></script>')
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Solves my problem – RPichioli Nov 13 '18 at 17:27
4

You can find best answer at the following link:

https://cleverbeagle.com/blog/articles/tutorial-how-to-load-third-party-scripts-dynamically-in-javascript

const loadDynamicScript = (callback) => {
const existingScript = document.getElementById('scriptId');

if (!existingScript) {
    const script = document.createElement('script');
    script.src = 'url'; // URL for the third-party library being loaded.
    script.id = 'libraryName'; // e.g., googleMaps or stripe
    document.body.appendChild(script);

    script.onload = () => {
      if (callback) callback();
    };
  }

  if (existingScript && callback) callback();
};
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    document.getElementById('scriptId'); shouldn't this be document.getElementById('libraryName'); – Asim K T Jul 14 at 3:19
1

To add script tag or code in head tag <head>, use react-helmet package. it is light and have good documentation.

To add Js code in script tag inside body,

    function htmlDecode(html) {
      return html.replace(/&([a-z]+);/ig, (match, entity) => {
        const entities = { amp: '&', apos: '\'', gt: '>', lt: '<', nbsp: '\xa0', quot: '"' };
        entity = entity.toLowerCase();
        if (entities.hasOwnProperty(entity)) {
          return entities[entity];
        }
        return match;
      });
    }
  render() {
    const scriptCode = `<script type="text/javascript">
          {(function() {
          window.hello={
            FIRST_NAME: 'firstName',
            LAST_NAME: 'lastName',
          };
          })()}
          </script>`
    return(
      <div dangerouslySetInnerHTML={{ __html: this.htmlDecode(scriptCode) }} />;
    );
  }

this code can be tested by console.log(windows.hello)

| improve this answer | |
0

for multiple scripts, use this

var loadScript = function(src) {
  var tag = document.createElement('script');
  tag.async = false;
  tag.src = src;
  document.getElementsByTagName('body').appendChild(tag);
}
loadScript('//cdnjs.com/some/library.js')
loadScript('//cdnjs.com/some/other/library.js')
| improve this answer | |
0
componentDidMount() {
  const head = document.querySelector("head");
  const script = document.createElement("script");
  script.setAttribute(
    "src",
    "https://assets.calendly.com/assets/external/widget.js"
  );
  head.appendChild(script);
}
| improve this answer | |
0

According to Alex McMillan's solution, I have the following adaptation.
My own environment: React 16.8+, next v9+

// add a custom component named Script
// hooks/Script.js

import { useEffect } from 'react'

const useScript = (url, async) => {
  useEffect(() => {
    const script = document.createElement('script')

    script.src = url
    script.async = (typeof async === 'undefined' ? true : async )

    document.body.appendChild(script)

    return () => {
      document.body.removeChild(script)
    }
  }, [url])
}

export default function Script({ src, async=true}) {

  useScript(src, async)

  return null  // Return null is necessary for the moment.
}

// Use the custom compoennt, just import it and substitute the old lower case <script> tag with the custom camel case <Script> tag would suffice.
// index.js

import Script from "../hooks/Script";

<Fragment>
  {/* Google Map */}
  <div ref={el => this.el = el} className="gmap"></div>

  {/* Old html script */}
  {/*<script type="text/javascript" src="http://maps.google.com/maps/api/js"></script>*/}

  {/* new custom Script component */}
  <Script src='http://maps.google.com/maps/api/js' async={false} />
</Fragment>
| improve this answer | |
  • There is one caveat for this component: this Script component can only guarantee the order of it's own siblings. If you use this component multiple times in multiple components of the same page, the scripts blocks might be out of order. The reason is that all the scripts are inserted by document.body.appendChild programmatically, instead of declaratively. Well helmet move all script tags in the head tag, which is not we want. – Sully Nov 3 '19 at 4:24
  • Hey @sully, my problem here is having the script added to the DOM severally, the best solution I've seen so far is during Component Unmounting, removing the child element (i.e. the <script>) from the DOM, and then it's being added again when the component is mounted on the DOM (I'm using react-router-dom and only one component need this script of all my components) – Eazy Nov 29 '19 at 22:18
0

A bit late to the party but I decided to create my own one after looking at @Alex Macmillan answers and that was by passing two extra parameters; the position in which to place the scripts such as or and setting up the async to true/false, here it is:

import { useEffect } from 'react';

const useScript = (url, position, async) => {
  useEffect(() => {
    const placement = document.querySelector(position);
    const script = document.createElement('script');

    script.src = url;
    script.async = typeof async === 'undefined' ? true : async;

    placement.appendChild(script);

    return () => {
      placement.removeChild(script);
    };
  }, [url]);
};

export default useScript;

The way to call it is exactly the same as shown in the accepted answer of this post but with two extra(again) parameters:

// First string is your URL
// Second string can be head or body
// Third parameter is true or false.
useScript("string", "string", bool);
| improve this answer | |
0

This answer explains the why behind this behavior.

Any approach to render the script tag doesn't work as expected:

  1. Using the script tag for external scripts
  2. Using dangerouslySetInnerHTML

Why

React DOM (the renderer for react on web) uses createElement calls to render JSX into DOM elements.

createElement uses the innerHTML DOM API to finally add these to the DOM (see code in React source). innerHTML does not execute script tag added as a security consideration. And this is the reason why in turn rendering script tags in React doesn't work as expected.

For how to use script tags in React check some other answers on this page.

| improve this answer | |
-3

Solution depends on scenario. Like in my case, I had to load a calendly embed inside a react component.

Calendly looks for a div and reads from it's data-url attribute and loads an iframe inside the said div.

It is all good when you first load the page: first, div with data-url is rendered. Then calendly script is added to body. Browser downloads and evaluates it and we all go home happy.

Problem comes when you navigate away and then come back into the page. This time the script is still in body and browser doesn't re-download & re-evaluate it.

Fix:

  1. On componentWillUnmount find and remove the script element. Then on re mount, repeat the above steps.
  2. Enter $.getScript. It is a nifty jquery helper that takes a script URI and a success callback. Once the script it loaded, it evaluates it and fires your success callback. All I have to do is in my componentDidMount $.getScript(url). My render method already has the calendly div. And it works smooth.
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Adding jQuery to do this is a bad idea, plus your case is very specific to you. In reality there is nothing wrong with adding the Calendly script once as I'm sure the API has a re-detect call. Removing and adding a script over and over again is not correct. – sidonaldson Apr 11 '17 at 15:17
  • @sidonaldson jQuery is not a bad practise if you gotta maintain a project its architecture compound of different frameworks (and libs) not just react, otherwize we need use native js to reach components – AlexNikonov Aug 21 '19 at 16:29

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