The font-weight property supports numeric values ranging from 100 to 900 inclusive, and keyword values such as normal corresponding to 400 and bold corresponding to 700.

There's also the bolder and lighter values, which make an element's font weight one step bolder or lighter than the current weight, respectively.

Is there a way to say "use the current weight"? That is, I don't want to make the font weight of this element lighter or bolder than its surrounding text — I want it to be the same. Like this, but pretend the span element is really a strong element (because semantics):

span {
  text-transform: uppercase;
}

header {
  font-weight: bold;
}
<header>
  <h1>Header</h1>
  <p>This is a <span>header</span>.</p>
</header>
<footer>
  <p>This is a <span>footer</span>.</p>
</footer>

My goal is to use a strong element but without its default font-weight style.

Obviously font-weight: normal doesn't work, since as mentioned normal specifically corresponds to the numeric weight of 400. I tried font-weight: initial, but that seems to have the same effect as font-weight: normal.

  • I'm a little confused by the question: The lighter and bolder keywords are already relative to the current font-weight (inherited from the nearest ancestor specifies a font-weight, or browser default if none was ever specified). – Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans Dec 23 '15 at 19:43
  • @Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans: Yeah, my question was how to specify the current weight without making it lighter or bolder. Let me see if I can come up with a better title. – BoltClock Dec 24 '15 at 5:28
  • I'm still not sure what you're asking - the current weight is simply inherited, it is what's applied unless other rules override it (or, overrule it, really). Part of the problem is that you talk about "surrounding text". There is no such thing in HTML/CSS. There's element trees, and what you show is a tree with two paragraphs that have nothing to do with each other. The spans you're showing are already the same weight as the <p> they're in, because of inheritance, so... what's the actual problem? – Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans Dec 24 '15 at 6:14
  • @Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans: The actual problem is not realizing that inheritance is what makes an element the same weight as its parent - hence my question coupled with the self-answer. And not everyone thinks in terms of element trees. (I do, but I've clearly had quite the brain fart here.) – BoltClock Dec 24 '15 at 6:20
  • they don't, which is why it's your, and my, responsibility to explain how CSS works when someone seems to not have a firm grasp of the basics of the DOM tree, and how that works in conjunction with that the "cascading" part of Cascading StyleSheets – Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans Dec 24 '15 at 6:54
up vote 12 down vote accepted

font-weight doesn't have a special keyword value for the "current weight". Instead, you use the CSS-wide inherit keyword to inherit the weight from the parent element (the element that contains the so-called "surrounding text" along with the element in question):

strong {
  font-weight: inherit;
  text-transform: uppercase;
}

header {
  font-weight: bold;
}
<header>
  <h1>Header</h1>
  <p>This is a <strong>header</strong>.</p>
</header>
<footer>
  <p>This is a <strong>footer</strong>.</p>
</footer>

This may not be obvious to those who aren't intimately familiar with the inherit keyword, or CSS inheritance in general. But the reason it works is because font-weight, like all other font properties, is inherited by nature, and in fact the bolder and lighter keyword values are based on the inherited value. From the spec:

bolder
Specifies a bolder weight than the inherited value.

lighter
Specifies a lighter weight than the inherited value.

So, it follows that one specifies the inherited value, unchanged, by using the inherit keyword.

The (also CSS-wide) initial keyword has the same effect as normal because the initial value of the font-weight property, as defined by the spec, is in fact normal. However, because font-weight is an inherited property, the property defaults to (for when there is no cascaded value) inheritance rather than the initial value of normal — setting initial explicitly results in a cascaded value of initial, which blocks inheritance, thereby resulting in a computed value of 400.

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