20

What is the difference between add_subplot() and subplot()? They both seem to add a subplot if one isn't there. I looked at the documentation but I couldn't make out the difference. Is it just for making future code more flexible?

For example:

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)

vs

plt.figure(1)
plt.subplot(111)

from matplotlib tutorials.

3 Answers 3

13

If you need a reference to ax for later use:

ax = fig.add_subplot(111)

gives you one while with:

plt.subplot(111)

you would need to do something like:

ax = plt.gca()

Likewise, if want to manipulate the figure later:

fig = plt.figure()

gives you a reference right away instead of:

fig = plt.gcf()

Getting explicit references is even more useful if you work with multiple subplots of figures. Compare:

figures = [plt.figure() for _ in range(5)]

with:

figures = []
for _ in range(5):
    plt.figure()
    figures.append(plt.gcf())
2
  • Does this explanation help? Commented Jan 6, 2016 at 12:53
  • 8
    that's not true. plt.subplot(111) returns a matplotlib.axes._subplots.AxesSubplot object, exactly as add_subplot, so you can do ax=plt.subplot(111)
    – Vincenzooo
    Commented Aug 17, 2017 at 17:33
6

pyplot.subplot is wrapper of Figure.add_subplot with a difference in behavior. Creating a subplot with pyplot.subplot will delete any pre-existing subplot that overlaps with it beyond sharing a boundary. If you do not want this behavior, use the Figure.add_subplot method or the pyplot.axes function instead. More

4

It's just like what Matplotlib document says, which has also been mentioned in @afruzan's answer.

matplotlib.pyplot.subplot: Creating a new Axes will delete any pre-existing Axes that overlaps with it beyond sharing a boundary. If you do not want this behavior, use the Figure.add_subplot method or the pyplot.axes function instead.

To make it more clear, here is an illustration:

  • Use Figure.add_subplot:
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
    
fig = plt.figure()
fig.add_subplot(131, facecolor='red')
fig.add_subplot(132, facecolor='green')
fig.add_subplot(133, facecolor='blue')
fig.add_subplot(231, facecolor='cyan')
plt.show()

enter image description here

  • Use pyplot.subplot:
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
    
fig = plt.figure()
fig.add_subplot(131, facecolor='red')
fig.add_subplot(132, facecolor='green')
fig.add_subplot(133, facecolor='blue')
plt.subplot(231, facecolor='cyan') # overlap with subplot generated by fig.add_subplot(131, facecolor='red'), so subplot generated by fig.add_subplot(131, facecolor='red') will be removed
plt.show()

enter image description here

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