40

How would I count consecutive characters in Python to see the number of times each unique digit repeats before the next unique digit?

At first, I thought I could do something like:

word = '1000'

counter = 0
print range(len(word))

for i in range(len(word) - 1):
    while word[i] == word[i + 1]:
        counter += 1
        print counter * "0"
    else:
        counter = 1
        print counter * "1"

So that in this manner I could see the number of times each unique digit repeats. But this, of course, falls out of range when i reaches the last value.

In the example above, I would want Python to tell me that 1 repeats 1, and that 0 repeats 3 times. The code above fails, however, because of my while statement.

How could I do this with just built-in functions?

6
  • 1
    What wrong with using len(word) - 1? Would also think you would need to initialize counter to 1
    – SGM1
    Dec 23, 2015 at 21:25
  • OK that actually helps a lot .... I'll keep working and see if I can come up with a solution!
    – vashts85
    Dec 23, 2015 at 21:27
  • 1
    why dont you add another if clause checking if i is bigger than len(word)
    – ivan
    Dec 23, 2015 at 21:28
  • 1
    Possible duplicate of Count number of specific elements in between other elements in list
    – baldr
    Dec 23, 2015 at 21:29
  • If your string was, instead, '100011' what would you want the output to be? My answer assumes [("1", 1), ("0", 3), ("1", 2)] but maybe you want something more nuanced than that?
    – Adam Smith
    Dec 23, 2015 at 22:04

17 Answers 17

81

Consecutive counts:

You can use itertools.groupby:

s = "111000222334455555"

from itertools import groupby

groups = groupby(s)
result = [(label, sum(1 for _ in group)) for label, group in groups]

After which, result looks like:

[("1": 3), ("0", 3), ("2", 3), ("3", 2), ("4", 2), ("5", 5)]

And you could format with something like:

", ".join("{}x{}".format(label, count) for label, count in result)
# "1x3, 0x3, 2x3, 3x2, 4x2, 5x5"

Total counts:

Someone in the comments is concerned that you want a total count of numbers so "11100111" -> {"1":6, "0":2}. In that case you want to use a collections.Counter:

from collections import Counter

s = "11100111"
result = Counter(s)
# {"1":6, "0":2}

Your method:

As many have pointed out, your method fails because you're looping through range(len(s)) but addressing s[i+1]. This leads to an off-by-one error when i is pointing at the last index of s, so i+1 raises an IndexError. One way to fix this would be to loop through range(len(s)-1), but it's more pythonic to generate something to iterate over.

For string that's not absolutely huge, zip(s, s[1:]) isn't a a performance issue, so you could do:

counts = []
count = 1
for a, b in zip(s, s[1:]):
    if a==b:
        count += 1
    else:
        counts.append((a, count))
        count = 1

The only problem being that you'll have to special-case the last character if it's unique. That can be fixed with itertools.zip_longest

import itertools

counts = []
count = 1
for a, b in itertools.zip_longest(s, s[1:], fillvalue=None):
    if a==b:
        count += 1
    else:
        counts.append((a, count))
        count = 1

If you do have a truly huge string and can't stand to hold two of them in memory at a time, you can use the itertools recipe pairwise.

def pairwise(iterable):
    """iterates pairwise without holding an extra copy of iterable in memory"""
    a, b = itertools.tee(iterable)
    next(b, None)
    return itertools.zip_longest(a, b, fillvalue=None)

counts = []
count = 1
for a, b in pairwise(s):
    ...
19
  • @baldr thanks for the list cast edit. I forgot it gives you some funky view instead with no __len__ defined. I prefer to sum the generator in those cases rather than building a list to throw away but YMMV
    – Adam Smith
    Dec 23, 2015 at 22:09
  • Isn't this just counting? What if you separate some of the numbers, like 11122111?
    – code_dredd
    Dec 23, 2015 at 22:10
  • @ray Then you get [("1", 3), ("2", 2), ("1", 3)]. The OP wants consecutive characters.
    – Adam Smith
    Dec 23, 2015 at 22:11
  • 1
    @AdamSmith: I gave you my +1. I think your answer is good and the use of built-in functionality is also better. It was at least my understanding (before OP's edit) that the OP was interested in an algorithm rather than built-in way of doing it.
    – code_dredd
    Dec 23, 2015 at 22:29
  • 1
    This is a bit old post, but I was trying this zip_longest solution and noticed that a reset of counts, count = 1, is also necessary as the last else statement (just as in the case of zip), otherwise the result will not be correct.
    – PedroA
    Sep 21, 2019 at 0:16
26

A solution "that way", with only basic statements:

word="100011010" #word = "1"
count=1
length=""
if len(word)>1:
    for i in range(1,len(word)):
       if word[i-1]==word[i]:
          count+=1
       else :
           length += word[i-1]+" repeats "+str(count)+", "
           count=1
    length += ("and "+word[i]+" repeats "+str(count))
else:
    i=0
    length += ("and "+word[i]+" repeats "+str(count))
print (length)

Output :

'1 repeats 1, 0 repeats 3, 1 repeats 2, 0 repeats 1, 1 repeats 1, and 0 repeats 1'
#'1 repeats 1'
3

Totals (without sub-groupings)

#!/usr/bin/python3 -B

charseq = 'abbcccdddd'
distros = { c:1 for c in charseq  }

for c in range(len(charseq)-1):
    if charseq[c] == charseq[c+1]:
        distros[charseq[c]] += 1

print(distros)

I'll provide a brief explanation for the interesting lines.

distros = { c:1 for c in charseq  }

The line above is a dictionary comprehension, and it basically iterates over the characters in charseq and creates a key/value pair for a dictionary where the key is the character and the value is the number of times it has been encountered so far.

Then comes the loop:

for c in range(len(charseq)-1):

We go from 0 to length - 1 to avoid going out of bounds with the c+1 indexing in the loop's body.

if charseq[c] == charseq[c+1]:
    distros[charseq[c]] += 1

At this point, every match we encounter we know is consecutive, so we simply add 1 to the character key. For example, if we take a snapshot of one iteration, the code could look like this (using direct values instead of variables, for illustrative purposes):

# replacing vars for their values
if charseq[1] == charseq[1+1]:
    distros[charseq[1]] += 1

# this is a snapshot of a single comparison here and what happens later
if 'b' == 'b':
    distros['b'] += 1

You can see the program output below with the correct counts:

➜  /tmp  ./counter.py
{'b': 2, 'a': 1, 'c': 3, 'd': 4}
7
  • He don't need just a count. He asks for the consecutive chars. Like: aabbbcdefabc: a:2, b:3, c:1, d:1, ...
    – baldr
    Dec 23, 2015 at 21:33
  • Replace for c in sentence with for c in zip(sentence, sentence[1:]) Dec 23, 2015 at 21:36
  • @inspectorG4dget: Did something a bit different as that change would not have worked with the previous code.
    – code_dredd
    Dec 23, 2015 at 21:54
  • @baldr: It produces {'a': 6, 'd': 4, 'f': 2, 'b': 2, 'c': 3}. It looks ok to me. If it won't work, can you be more specific on what, exactly, you think the issue is?
    – code_dredd
    Dec 23, 2015 at 22:11
  • @ray, expected output should be a:1, b:2, c:3, d:4, a:4, f:2, a:3
    – baldr
    Dec 23, 2015 at 22:12
1

If we want to count consecutive characters without looping, we can make use of pandas:

In [1]: import pandas as pd

In [2]: sample = 'abbcccddddaaaaffaaa'
In [3]: d = pd.Series(list(sample))

In [4]: [(cat[1], grp.shape[0]) for cat, grp in d.groupby([d.ne(d.shift()).cumsum(), d])]
Out[4]: [('a', 1), ('b', 2), ('c', 3), ('d', 4), ('a', 4), ('f', 2), ('a', 3)]

The key is to find the first elements that are different from their previous values and then make proper groupings in pandas:

In [5]: sample = 'abba'
In [6]: d = pd.Series(list(sample))

In [7]: d.ne(d.shift())
Out[7]:
0     True
1     True
2    False
3     True
dtype: bool

In [8]: d.ne(d.shift()).cumsum()
Out[8]:
0    1
1    2
2    2
3    3
dtype: int32
0

You only need to change len(word) to len(word) - 1. That said, you could also use the fact that False's value is 0 and True's value is 1 with sum:

sum(word[i] == word[i+1] for i in range(len(word)-1))

This produces the sum of (False, True, True, False) where False is 0 and True is 1 - which is what you're after.

If you want this to be safe you need to guard empty words (index -1 access):

sum(word[i] == word[i+1] for i in range(max(0, len(word)-1)))

And this can be improved with zip:

sum(c1 == c2 for c1, c2 in zip(word[:-1], word[1:]))
1
  • What I am actually trying to do is something like this:
    – vashts85
    Dec 23, 2015 at 21:35
0

This is my simple code for finding maximum number of consecutive 1's in binaray string in python 3:

count= 0
maxcount = 0
for i in str(bin(13)):
    if i == '1':
        count +=1
    elif count > maxcount:
        maxcount = count;
        count = 0
    else:
        count = 0
if count > maxcount: maxcount = count        
maxcount
1
  • 1
    This doesn't really answer the question. OP wants to count the number of consecutive characters for each character in the string.
    – nbryans
    Jan 25, 2017 at 18:20
0

There is no need to count or groupby. Just note the indices where a change occurs and subtract consecutive indicies.

w = "111000222334455555"
iw = [0] + [i+1 for i in range(len(w)-1) if w[i] != w[i+1]] + [len(w)]
dw = [w[i] for i in range(len(w)-1) if w[i] != w[i+1]] + [w[-1]]
cw = [ iw[j] - iw[j-1] for j in range(1, len(iw) ) ]

print(dw)  # digits
['1', '0', '2', '3', '4']
print(cw)  # counts
[3, 3, 3, 2, 2, 5]

w = 'XXYXYYYXYXXzzzzzYYY'
iw = [0] + [i+1 for i in range(len(w)-1) if w[i] != w[i+1]] + [len(w)]
dw = [w[i] for i in range(len(w)-1) if w[i] != w[i+1]] + [w[-1]]
cw = [ iw[j] - iw[j-1] for j in range(1, len(iw) ) ]
print(dw)  # characters
print(cw)  # digits

['X', 'Y', 'X', 'Y', 'X', 'Y', 'X', 'z', 'Y']
[2, 1, 1, 3, 1, 1, 2, 5, 3]
0

A one liner that returns the amount of consecutive characters with no imports:

def f(x):s=x+" ";t=[x[1] for x in zip(s[0:],s[1:],s[2:]) if (x[1]==x[0])or(x[1]==x[2])];return {h: t.count(h) for h in set(t)}

That returns the amount of times any repeated character in a list is in a consecutive run of characters.

alternatively, this accomplishes the same thing, albeit much slower:

def A(m):t=[thing for x,thing in enumerate(m) if thing in [(m[x+1] if x+1<len(m) else None),(m[x-1] if x-1>0 else None)]];return {h: t.count(h) for h in set(t)}

In terms of performance, I ran them with

site = 'https://web.njit.edu/~cm395/theBeeMovieScript/'
s = urllib.request.urlopen(site).read(100_000)
s = str(copy.deepcopy(s))
print(timeit.timeit('A(s)',globals=locals(),number=100))
print(timeit.timeit('f(s)',globals=locals(),number=100))

which resulted in:

12.528256356999918
5.351301653001428

This method can definitely be improved, but without using any external libraries, this was the best I could come up with.

0

In python

your_string = "wwwwweaaaawwbbbbn"
current = ''
count = 0
for index, loop in enumerate(your_string):
    current = loop
    count = count + 1
    if index == len(your_string)-1:
        print(f"{count}{current}", end ='')
        break

    if your_string[index+1] != current:
        print(f"{count}{current}",end ='')
        count = 0
        continue

This will output

5w1e4a2w4b1n
0
#I wrote the code using simple loops and if statement
s='feeekksssh' #len(s) =11
count=1  #f:0, e:3, j:2, s:3 h:1
l=[]
for i in range(1,len(s)): #range(1,10)
    if s[i-1]==s[i]:
        count = count+1
    else:
        l.append(count)
        count=1
    if i == len(s)-1: #To check the last character sequence we need loop reverse order
        reverse_count=1
        for i in range(-1,-(len(s)),-1): #Lopping only for last character
            if s[i] == s[i-1]:
                reverse_count = reverse_count+1
            else:
                l.append(reverse_count)
                break
print(l)
0

Today I had an interview and was asked the same question. I was struggling with the original solution in mind:

s = 'abbcccda'

old = ''
cnt = 0
res = ''
for c in s:
    cnt += 1
    if old != c:
        res += f'{old}{cnt}'
        old = c
        cnt = 0  # default 0 or 1 neither work
print(res)
#  1a1b2c3d1

Sadly this solution always got unexpected edge cases result(is there anyone to fix the code? maybe i need post another question), and finally timeout the interview.

After the interview I calmed down and soon got a stable solution I think(though I like the groupby best).

s = 'abbcccda'

olds = []
for c in s:
    if olds and c in olds[-1]:
        olds[-1].append(c)
    else:
        olds.append([c])
print(olds)
res = ''.join([f'{lst[0]}{len(lst)}' for lst in olds])
print(res)

#  [['a'], ['b', 'b'], ['c', 'c', 'c'], ['d'], ['a']]
#  a1b2c3d1a1
0

Here is my simple solution:

def count_chars(s):
    size = len(s)
    count = 1
    op = ''
    for i in range(1, size):
        if s[i] == s[i-1]:
            count += 1
        else:
            op += "{}{}".format(count, s[i-1])
            count = 1
    if size:
        op += "{}{}".format(count, s[size-1])

    return op
0
data_input = 'aabaaaabbaaaaax'
start = 0
end = 0
temp_dict = dict()
while start < len(data_input):
  if data_input[start] == data_input[end]:
     end = end + 1
  if end == len(data_input):
     value = data_input[start:end]
     temp_dict[value] = len(value)
     break
  if data_input[start] != data_input[end]:
     value = data_input[start:end]
     temp_dict[value] = len(value)
     start = end
print(temp_dict)
1
  • Your answer could be improved with additional supporting information. Please edit to add further details, such as citations or documentation, so that others can confirm that your answer is correct. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Community Bot
    Jul 14, 2022 at 21:03
0

PROBLEM: we need to count consecutive characters and return characters with their count.

def countWithString(input_string:str)-> str:
    count = 1
    output = ''
 
    for i in range(1,len(input_string)):
        if input_string[i]==input_string[i-1]:
            count +=1
        else:
            output += f"{count}{input_string[i-1]}"
            count = 1
    # Used to add last string count (at last else condition will not run and data will not be inserted to ouput string)
    output += f"{count}{input_string[-1]}"
    return output

countWithString(input)

input:'aaabbbaabbcc' output:'3a3b2a2b2c'

Time Complexity: O(n) Space Complexity: O(1)

0
temp_str = "aaaajjbbbeeeeewwjjj"
def consecutive_charcounter(input_str):
    counter = 0
    temp_list = []
    for i in range(len(input_str)):
        if i==0:
            counter+=1
        elif input_str[i]== input_str[i-1]:
            counter+=1
            if i == len(input_str)-1:
                temp_list.extend([input_str[i - 1], str(counter)])
        else:
            temp_list.extend([input_str[i-1],str(counter)])
            counter = 1
    print("".join(temp_list))

consecutive_charcounter(temp_str)

0

I recently had this as an interview question and got it right with some prompting from the interviewer. In reviewing my work after the fact, I came across this post.

Here was my basic answer which I think is clearer and easier to understand:

string = input()
count = 1
answer = ''
first_char = string[0]
for char in range(1, len(string)):
    if first_char == string[char]:
        count += 1
    else:
        answer += f"{first_char}{count}"
        first_char = string[char]
        count = 1

answer += f"{first_char}{count}"
print(f"{answer}")
0

I was hoping str.count() would have a consecutive=False keyword, but it doesn't. So I came up with this, very likely suboptimal and slow, method, whose major selling point is its use of only one loop:

>>> s='111aaaaaaaabbbdccc5555555555s'
>>> while s:
...  n = s.lstrip(s[0:1])
...  print('%s: %d' % (s[0:1], len(s) - len(n)))
...  s = n
... 
1: 3
a: 8
b: 3
d: 1
c: 3
5: 10
s: 1

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