18

I'm trying to play with Angular 2-beta and I want to work with Http component. But there is a serious problem here:

I read this and I know in Angular 2(Unlike Angular 1), Http component is not a service that returns a Promise. It returns something called Observable. We know that a Component is better not to use Http directly. Efficient way is to make a service that is responsible to consume Http. But how?! Should this after completing a request, return a promise? (look at here)

Does it make sense at all?!

  • 1
    You can use HTTP as a promise by adding .toPromise() followed by your chain of .then() calls. Still, observables are the recommended approach. – Evan Plaice Jan 25 '16 at 17:48
  • 1
    @EvanPlaice Yeah I read about them and now I'm a fan of Observables :) – soroush gholamzadeh Jan 25 '16 at 18:57
  • have a look at this stackoverflow.com/a/34758630/5043867 – Pardeep Jain Jan 30 '16 at 17:43
25

It's possible with Angular 2 to implement services. They simply correspond to injectable classes as described below. In this case this class can be injected into other elements like components.

import {Injectable} from 'angular2/core';
import {Http, Headers} from 'angular2/http';
import 'rxjs/add/operator/map';

@Injectable()
export class CompanyService {
  constructor(http:Http) {
    this.http = http;
  }
}

You can inject an Http object in it (using its constructor) at the condition you specified HTTP_PROVIDERS when bootstraping the main component of your application:

import {bootstrap} from 'angular2/platform/browser'
import {HTTP_PROVIDERS} from 'angular2/http';
import {AppComponent} from './app.component'

bootstrap(AppComponent, [
  HTTP_PROVIDERS
]);

This service can be then injected into a component, as described below. Don't forget to specify it within the providers list of the component.

import { Component, View, Inject } from 'angular2/core';
import { CompanyService } from './company-service';

@Component({
  selector: 'company-list',
  providers: [ CompanyService ],
  template: `
    (...)  `
})

export class CompanyList {
  constructor(private service: CompanyService) {
    this.service = service;
  }
}

You can then implement a method leveraging the Http object in your service and return the Observable object corresponding to your request:

@Injectable()
export class CompanyService {
  constructor(http:Http) {
    this.http = http;
  }

  getCompanies() {
    return this.http.get('https://angular2.apispark.net/v1/companies/')
                  .map(res => res.json());
  }
}

The component can then call this getCompanies method and subscribe a callback on the Observable object to be notify when the response is there to update the state of the component (in the same way you did with promises in Angular1):

export class CompanyList implements OnInit {
  public companies: Company[];

  constructor(private service: CompanyService) {
    this.service = service;
  }

  ngOnInit() {
    this.service.getCompanies().subscribe(
      data => this.companies = data);
  }
}

Edit

As foxx suggested in his comment, the async pipe could be also used to implicitly subscribe on the observable object. Here is the way to use it. First update your component to put the observable object in the attribute you want to display:

export class CompanyList implements OnInit {
  public companies: Company[];

  constructor(private service: CompanyService) {
    this.service = service;
  }

  ngOnInit() {
    this.companies = this.service.getCompanies();
  }
}

Use then the async pipe in your template:

@Component({
  selector: 'company-list',
  providers: [ CompanyService ],
  template: `
    <ul>
      <li *ngFor="#company of companies | async">{{company.name}}</li>
    </ul>
  `
})
export class CompanyList implements OnInit {
  (...)
}

This article in two parts could give more details as well:

Hope it helps you, Thierry

  • 7
    You might want to use async pipe instead of manually subscribing. – fxck Dec 24 '15 at 10:18
  • Thanks very much @foox for your comment! I updated my answer to describe how to use the async pipe ;-) – Thierry Templier Dec 24 '15 at 10:28
  • A little question, You imported HTTP_PROVIDERS in bootstrap but injected ROUTER_PROVIDERS. is it a typo? – soroush gholamzadeh Dec 24 '15 at 10:31
  • I could make it a separate question, but it's just a little addon to your answer. How to use interval with http requests? – M.D. Dec 28 '15 at 6:28
  • Neat, I've been looking for a simple example that demonstrates how to use the async pipe. – Evan Plaice Jan 25 '16 at 17:52
7

There is no need to convert the observable returned by Http's get() method into a promise. In most cases, the service can simply return the observable.

If we are fetching an array or a primitive type (i.e., string, number, boolean) from the server, we can simplify our controller logic by using the returned observable directly in our template, with the asyncPipe. This pipe will automatically subscribe to the observable (it also works with a promise) and it will return the most recent value that the observable has emitted. When a new value is emitted, the pipe marks the component to be checked for changes, hence the view will automatically update with the new value.

If we are fetching an object from the server, I'm not aware of any way to use asyncPipe, we could use the async pipe, in conjunction with the safe navigation operator as follows:

{{(objectData$ | async)?.name}}

But that looks complicated, and we'd have to repeat that for each object property we wanted to display.

Instead, I suggest we subscribe() to the observable in the component and store the contained object into a component property. We then use the safe navigation operator (?.) or (as @Evan Plaice mentioned in a comment) NgIf in the template. If we don't use the safe navigation operator or NgIf, an error will be thrown when the template first tries to render, because the object is not yet populated with a value.

Note how the service below always returns an observable for each of the get methods.

service.ts

import {Injectable} from 'angular2/core';
import {Http} from 'angular2/http';
import 'rxjs/add/operator/map';  // we need to import this now

@Injectable()
export class MyService {
  constructor(private _http:Http) {}
  getArrayDataObservable() {
    return this._http.get('./data/array.json')
      .map(data => data.json());
  }
  getPrimitiveDataObservable() {
    return this._http.get('./data/primitive.txt')
      .map(data => data.text());   // note .text() here
  }
  getObjectDataObservable() {
    return this._http.get('./data/object.json')
      .map(data => data.json());
  }
}

app.ts

import {Component} from 'angular2/core';
import {MyService} from './my-service.service';
import {HTTP_PROVIDERS} from 'angular2/http';

@Component({
  selector: 'my-app',
  providers: [HTTP_PROVIDERS, MyService],
  template: `
    <div>array data using '| async':
      <div *ngFor="#item of arrayData$ | async">{{item}}</div>
    </div>
    <div>primitive data using '| async': {{primitiveData$ | async}}</div>
    <div>object data using ?.: {{objectData?.name}}</div>
    <div *ngIf="objectData">object data using NgIf: {{objectData.name}}</div>`
})
export class AppComponent {
  constructor(private _myService:MyService) { console.clear(); }
  ngOnInit() {
    this.arrayData$     = this._myService.getArrayDataObservable();
    this.primitiveData$ = this._myService.getPrimitiveDataObservable();
    this._myService.getObjectDataObservable()
      .subscribe(data => this.objectData = data);
  }
}

Note: I put "Observable" in the service method names – e.g., getArrayDataObervable() – just to highlight that the method returns an Observable. Normally you won't put "Observable" in the name.

data/array.json

[ 1,2,3 ]

data/primitive.json

Greetings SO friends!

data/object.json

{ "name": "Mark" }

Output:

array data using '| async':
1
2
3
primitive data using '| async': Greetings SO friends!
object data using .?: Mark
object data using NgIf: Mark

Plunker


One drawback with using the async pipe is that there is no mechanism to handle server errors in the component. I answered another question that explains how to catch such errors in the component, but we always need to use subscribe() in this case.

  • 1
    A useful alternative to the? (elvis) operator is to add a *ngIf conditional to the template section where the data will be used. It provides a coarser grained level of control so you don't have to worry about sprinkling elvis operators all over the template or worry about how the template will look when it's rendered with no data. – Evan Plaice Jan 25 '16 at 17:57
  • @EvanPlaice, thanks, I updated the answer to include your suggestion. – Mark Rajcok Jan 28 '16 at 16:05

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