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I'm trying to execute a powershell from a batch file with the commande: Powershell .\nameoffile.ps1

The PowerShell returns some values 1, 4, 0 and -1 . How can I get these values from the batch? When I use %errorlevel% it only returns 0 (which means that the script is okay). I have also tried using the Exit command in PowerShell (Exit 4) but It does not work. Can you help me?

EDIT I have found a solution if someone is interested.

powershell "&{.\test.ps1 %* ;exit $LastExitCode}" set code=%errorlevel%

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5 Answers 5

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If you need to use this value in your bat environment use FOR /F :

@echo off
for /f "delims=" %%a in ('powershell .\test.ps1') do Set "$Value=%%a"

Echo Value received from Powershell : %$Value%
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  • Hi Sacha, That's will work but it will not log the powershell file. It will be executed in background.
    – Yam
    Commented Dec 31, 2015 at 10:17
  • Why is the dollar sign there in $Value? can it be $Value -> anythingAtAll?
    – Chris
    Commented Dec 20, 2023 at 20:55
  • You can remove the $ char and put value if you want!
    – SachaDee
    Commented Dec 21, 2023 at 18:13
  • Getting a `%%a was unexpected at this time" on windows server 2016, although it works everywhere else I've tested.
    – Chris
    Commented Jan 3 at 14:48
  • Hi Chris do you use a .bat file if its direct in the PS console use %a in place of %%a
    – SachaDee
    Commented Jan 19 at 4:19
6
powershell "&{.\test.ps1 %* ;exit $LastExitCode}" set code=%errorlevel%
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  • 1
    "Unexpected token 'set' in expression or statement"
    – im_chc
    Commented Dec 31, 2021 at 8:54
2

I know it's a little bit late to answer this question, but I would like to give it a try just in case any one needs more detailed solution. So, here it goes.

I created a batch function that would execute ps script for you and return a value, something like this:

:: A function that would execute powershell script and return a value from it.
:: <PassPSCMD> pass the powreshell command, notice that you need to add any returning value witth Write-Host
:: <RetValue> the returned value
:RunPS <PassPSCMD> <RetValue>
  for /F "usebackq tokens=1" %%i in (`Powershell %1`) do set returnValue=%%i
  set "%2=%returnValue%"
Goto:eof
:: End of :RunPS function

Now, as an example to use it:

set psCmd="&{ Write-Host 'You got it';}"
call :RunPS %psCmd% RetValue
echo %RetValue%

This will display on console screen You got it

As a more complicated example, I would add:

Let's assume that we want to check if a VM is Up or Down, meaning if it's powered on or off, so we can do the following:

 :CheckMachineUpOrDown <returnResult> <passedMachineName>
   set userName=vCenterAdministratorAccount
   set passWord=vCenterAdminPW
   set vCenterName=vcenter.somedmain.whatever
   set psCmd="&{Add-PSSnapin VMware.VimAutomation.Core; Connect-VIServer -server %%vCenterName%% -User %userName% -Password %passWord%; $vmServer = Get-VM %2;Write-Host ($vmServer.PowerState -eq 'PoweredOn')}"

   call :RunPS %psCmd% RetValue
   if "%RetValue%" EQU "True" (set "%1=Up") else (set "%1=Down")
 Goto:eof

:: A function that would execute powershell script and return a value from it.
:: <PassPSCMD> pass the powreshell command, notice that you need to add any returning value witth Write-Host
:: <RetValue> the returned value
:RunPS <PassPSCMD> <RetValue>
  for /F "usebackq tokens=1" %%i in (`Powershell %1`) do set returnValue=%%i
  set "%2=%returnValue%"
  Goto:eof
:: End of :RunPS function

Now, how to use :CheckMachineUpOrDown function?

just follow this example:

set Workstation=MyVMName
call :CheckMachineUpOrDown VMStatus %Workstation%
echo %VMStatus%

This will display Up if the VM is Powered On or Down if the machine is Off.

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  • Without an additional function, as in the example with VM, Powershell does not return control. When you insert an intermediate function, everything is OK.:SetCmd <returnResult> <RetValue> set psCmd="&{Write-Host You_got_it;Break Script}" call :RunPS %psCmd% RetValue Goto:eof
    – Garric
    Commented May 8, 2020 at 16:54
  • Thanks. I was looking for an example of working with Powershell without additional .ps1 files for a very long time.
    – Garric
    Commented May 8, 2020 at 17:08
  • newbedev.com/… Commented Nov 11, 2021 at 10:40
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What about something like this?

test.bat

@echo off
powershell .\test.ps1 >output.log
type output.log

It just redirects the output of the powershell script to a text file and then outputs the contents of the text file to the console.

Here is my test.ps1 file

Write-Output "Hello World"
Exit

And here is the output:

C:\temp\batchtest>test.bat

Hello World

C:\temp\batchtest>

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  • Hi Scott thanks for your comment. But I don't want to create a new file. I have found a method, I will refresh my post
    – Yam
    Commented Dec 31, 2015 at 10:16
-1

You can use tee-object.

This will display the returned value in host console.

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