3

A cartoon has this hello world program as an example of Ruby code.

The code looks like this; but has a number of non-printable unicode characters that I can't get into the Stack Overflow code editor.

      = 1
      =  + 
      =   *  + 
      =    *  
      = 
      [      *(   +  )+  , 
             =     *    + , 
             =     *    +    -  , 
            , 
            =        +    ,
        *  +    +  , 
        *    -  *    +   +  , 
           , 
           + +  , 
            , 
        *    ,     + +  , 
        ]
puts      .map(&:chr).join

I wanted to see how it worked, but when I initially tried running it in several online IDEs, they all reported syntax errors because GitHub didn't put the unicode chars in the web version. Anyone trying to copy the code from here or the GitHub page instead of downloading the zip version (to get the special characters) will have the same problem. Having figured out the problem with getting it to run, how does it work?

  • 2
    No way I'm running this. :) – Sergio Tulentsev Dec 24 '15 at 16:25
  • 2
    It is very likely that the original code is full of invisible unicode characters that were lost somewhere on the way into your ide. And they are sure to be absent here. – Sergio Tulentsev Dec 24 '15 at 16:27
  • 1
    Hmm. Copying from a downloaded zip file into ideone, got the code to run there (and showed all the hidden unicode); but the SO editor seems to be eating them since i still can't paste it into here. – Dan Neely Dec 24 '15 at 16:34
  • 1
    @KyleStrand: but it's still "can't be reproduced", so it's not answerable. – Sergio Tulentsev Dec 24 '15 at 16:47
  • 1
    @SergioTulentsev The original code works if you get all the unicode in; not being able to have the working code in the question itself appears to be a problem with the SO code editor. Working example in IDEONE – Dan Neely Dec 24 '15 at 16:51
14

In the zipped file, a character that resembles an underscore is used. Replacing those characters with an underscore does not change the program's behavior, so I will do so here:

_     = 1
__    = _+_
___   = __*__+_
____  = ___*__
_____ = 
      [____  *(___+__)+__, 
    _______  = ____*____+_, 
    ________ = ____*____+____-__, 
    ________, 
    _______ = _______+____,
    ____*__+____+__, 
    ____*____-__*____+___+__, 
    _______, 
    _______+_+__, 
    ________, 
    ____*____, ____+_+__, 
    ____]
puts _____.map(&:chr).join

Notice that sequences of one to eight (excluding six) _ are used as different variables, so let's replace them with a, b, ... h (excluding f) to make them easier to read:

a     = 1
b    = a+a
c   = b*b+a
d  = c*b
e = 
      [d  *(c+b)+b, 
    g  = d*d+a, 
    h = d*d+d-b, 
    h, 
    g = g+d,
    d*b+d+b, 
    d*d-b*d+c+b, 
    g, 
    g+a+b, 
    h, 
    d*d, d+a+b, 
    d]
puts e.map(&:chr).join

After usual formatting, you get:

a = 1
b = a + a
c = b * b + a
d = c * b
e = [
  d * (c + b) + b,
  g = d * d + a,
  h = d * d + d - b,
  h,
  g = g + d,
  d * b + d + b,
  d * d - b * d + c + b,
  g,
  g + a + b,
  h,
  d * d,
  d + a + b,
  d
]
puts e.map(&:chr).join

It all starts with a = 1, and eventually defines the array e, which is:

e # => [72, 101, 108, 108, 111, 32, 87, 111, 114, 108, 100, 13, 10]

And each of its element is the ASCII code of character in "Hello World\r\n". By applying chr to that number, you get:

["H", "e", "l", "l", "o", " ", "W", "o", "r", "l", "d", "\r", "\n"]

and when you join them and puts, you get the output:

Hello World
  • 3
    The “character that resembles an underscore” appears to be U+00A0 NO-BREAK SPACE (I guess your editor is adding the underlines so you can see the characters are there). Strangely this seems to be a valid character for a local variable–in fact a quick test suggests that Ruby will accept many (if not all) of the unicode space characters as valid variables names. Possibly a Ruby bug? – matt Dec 24 '15 at 17:52
  • 1
    @matt No it is not. That is the usual case. Different natural languages occasionally have additional white space characters, and handling all of them across languages as white space characters would be a mess. I used emacs, by the way. – sawa Dec 24 '15 at 17:58
  • @sawa Which zipped file are you referring? The zip file option in gist page? – Wand Maker Dec 24 '15 at 18:23
  • 1
    @WandMaker I got the file directly into Ruby using require 'open-uri'; s = open("https://gist.githubusercontent.com/qrohlf/7045823/raw/62872dc449eb9e330df146cc2d49050da853ae4d/helloworld").read. (The url is from the “Raw” link on the gist page). From there you can examine the string with e.g. s.bytes, s.chars etc. – matt Dec 24 '15 at 18:47
  • 1
    @matt If you're willing to go big hammer instead of elegant, a standalone pass with a unicode validator could do the job without making significant changes to the build process. – Dan Neely Dec 24 '15 at 19:32

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