13

I try to hash passwords with crypto and I cannot save them in the database.

I have node.js 4.2.3 express 4.13.3, and my database is PostgreSQL 9.1. The field is character varying (255) and is named pswrd.

This is my code:

var tobi = new User({
    usrnm:'sp',
    pswrd:'an'
});

module.exports = User;

function User(obj){
    for(var key in obj){
        this[key] = obj[key];
    }
}

User.prototype.save = function (fn){
    var user=this;
     //EDIT, added this :
     var psw ;
    var salt = crypto.randomBytes(50).toString('base64');
    crypto.pbkdf2(user.pswrd, salt, 10000, 150, 'sha512',function(err, derivedKey) {
        //user.pswrd = derivedKey.toString('hex');
         //EDIT, added this:
         var justCrypted = derivedKey.toString('hex');
    });

    var query=client.query('INSERT INTO mytable(usrnm,pswrd)VALUES($1,$2) RETURNING mytable_id',[user.usrnm,user.pswrd], function(err, result) {
        if(err) {console.log(err)}
        else {
          var newlyCreatedId = result.rows[0].mytable_id;
        }
    });
    query.on("end", function (result) {console.log(result);client.end();});
}

tobi.save(function (err){
    if (err)throw error;
    console.log("yo");
})  

To run this, I type node lib/user. I get no errors, but the password is not saved properly. The first value gets saved, the an, not the hashed one. What am I missing here?

EDIT

AshleyB answer is good, but, please help me understand how to pass data from an internal function (crypto.pbkdf2) to its external (User.prototype.save = function (fn)) , when the internal has predifined, fixed syntax (crypto.pbkdf2) , so I dont know if or how I can edit it.

How can I leave code as is and still pass the justCrypted back to psw (see edits on code) ? If it was a function that I wrote, I could use apply I guess, but, crypto.pbkdf2 is predifined and I dont know if can add stuff to it.

Thanks

  • 1
    What happens when you move the query inside the crypto.pbkdf2... function? It could just be down to scope. Try console.log(user.pswrd) just before your query to see what the value is. – Ashley B Dec 24 '15 at 22:55
  • @AshleyB Oh yes, it had to be something that simple so I can feel like an idiot on Christmas eve. Thanks man, you saved me. – slevin Dec 24 '15 at 23:09
  • I'll post an answer (with updated code), if you find it useful then please accept it as the solution. – Ashley B Dec 24 '15 at 23:10
9

The problem is with the scope, currently the query the altered user.pswrd is outside of the scope of the query so it falls back to the value assigned at the top.

By moving the query inside the 'crypto.pbkdf2'... block the user.pswrd value will work as intended. I've updated your code (and made the salt generation asynchronous, as you have used the async version of pbkdf2 anyway).

var tobi = new User({
  usrnm: 'sp',
  pswrd: 'an'
});

module.exports = User;

function User(obj) {
  for (var key in obj) {
    this[key] = obj[key];
  }
}

User.prototype.save = function(fn) {
  var user = this;


  // Changed salt generation to async version
  // See: https://nodejs.org/api/crypto.html#crypto_crypto_randombytes_size_callback

  crypto.randomBytes(50, function(ex, buf) {
  if (ex) throw ex;
  salt = buf.toString('base64');

    // password, salt, iterations, keylen[, digest], callback
    crypto.pbkdf2(user.pswrd, salt, 10000, 150, 'sha512', function(err, derivedKey) {
    user.pswrd = derivedKey.toString('hex');

        // Moved the query within the hash function
    var query = client.query('INSERT INTO mytable(usrnm,pswrd)VALUES($1,$2) RETURNING mytable_id', [user.usrnm, user.pswrd], function(err, result) {
      if (err) {
        console.log(err)
      } else {
        var newlyCreatedId = result.rows[0].mytable_id;
      }
    });
    query.on("end", function(result) {
      console.log(result);
      client.end();
    });

  });


    });

}


tobi.save(function(err) {
  if (err) throw error;
  console.log("yo");
})
  • 1
    This is the right solution, but the problem is not the scope but asynchronous calls. The problem is (and @slevin should learn to think like that), that crypto.pbkdf2 y asyncronous call and it returns before any internal functionality gets executed, so when slevin was writing to the database, nothing were hashed yet. All processing that needs the hashed value MUST go inside callback function of crypto.pbkdf2. – dmikam Jan 8 '16 at 15:06
  • Yes indeed, the original problem was scope, but you are right - the edited question is about async. You're right that ideally, all the processing should go inside the crypto.pbkdf2 callback. – Ashley B Jan 8 '16 at 15:28
  • Ah, ok. I haven't seen the original post - only the edited one. – dmikam Jan 8 '16 at 15:46
1

To answer your edit, I think you just need to understand that crypto.pbkdf2 is an asynchronous function that has a callback function as it's last parameter.

So within that callback function, you can access the psw variable, and you are able to do something like psw = newlyCreatedId. However, in your code the query is most likely called before the callback is. Therefore, you cannot make use of the psw variable in the query as your code stands.

What Ashley B did is to put your query function within the callback, to ensure that the query is not called until after the crypto function. You could also structure your code to use events, or promises if you didn't wish to nest the functions.

1
+100

This is to answer your EDIT and to help you understand the passing of data between internal and external functions:

I've modified your code slightly to demonstrate the point. What you must understand is the scope and context of the calling function and how your function gets invoked. Crypto.pbkdf2 function accepts a function as a callback. This function is not part of the regular/sequential flow of control. The pbkdf2 function is an 'asynchronous' function - it returns immediately, but the processing can continue on background. This is why the code marked with '//Output 1: This will be undefined' below, will output 'undefined'. The main thread continues while pbkdf2 continues processing in background.

When the system is done processing, it calls the function you specified as the callback to let you know its done processing. Think of it as an SMS you send to someone vs. making a phone call. They reply back with an SMS whenever they get a chance.

However, when the system invokes the callback function, the "scope" or the "context" is different (think of it as an external entity calling your callback function). Therefore, it does not know what the scope/variables/functions in your context. In order to pass data between callback function and your objects, you can use the 'bind' method along with 'this' keyword:

var tobi = new User({
    usrnm:'sp',
    pswrd:'an'
});
module.exports = User;
function User(obj){
    for(var key in obj){
        this[key] = obj[key];
    }
}
User.prototype.save = function (fn){
    var user=this;

     var psw ; //Change this to this.psw to pass changes back.
     var crypto = require('crypto');
    var salt = crypto.randomBytes(50).toString('base64');
    crypto.pbkdf2(user.pswrd, salt, 10000, 150, 'sha512',function(err, derivedKey) {

         var justCrypted = derivedKey.toString('hex');
         console.log('Finished crypting' + justCrypted);
         this.psw = justCrypted;
//When we use 'this' here, we set the value in the right scope/context.
//The var psw does not exist outside the scope of this function, so the
//external function will not know about it. By defining it in the current
// (this) scope, we ensure that external function is also aware of it.
         this.externalFunction(justCrypted);
//Bind the callback function to the current context - it will remember 
//this when the callback gets invoked. Think of it as explicitly specifying
//the 'context' of the call/method.
    }.bind(this));
    //Output 1: This will be undefined as callback has not returned yet.
    console.log('New psw' + this.psw); 

    /*var query=client.query('INSERT INTO mytable(usrnm,pswrd)VALUES($1,$2) RETURNING mytable_id',[user.usrnm,user.pswrd], function(err, result) {
        if(err) {console.log(err)}
        else {
          var newlyCreatedId = result.rows[0].mytable_id;
        }
    });
    query.on("end", function (result) {console.log(result);client.end();}); */
}
User.prototype.externalFunction = function (someData) {
    console.log('Data passed from an internal function');
    console.log('New PSW: ' + this.psw);
    console.log('Data from external function: ' + someData);
}
tobi.save(function (err){
    if (err)throw error;
    console.log("yo");
})

If I run the above, I see the following output. Note that data is now being passed between internal and external functions via the callback:

C:\temp\node\npm-test>node index.js
New pswundefined
3f9219ae14f9246622973724ace5cb66b190a4b5e86abf482fce5d7889e6aff870741d672ff78e7765fada25f150c70e5e61
c13b5bcdec634d03830668348b5a7d06cf75f426259dcf804241eb2f4362d10f1ebf23a1aecca28072a3f38fb8a39eba88c9
f055e9e7ccabafcd8caed25d8b26f3726022973175545f77e4024bcbcc657081ea5d1f2baf5e9080cbb20696135f2be8834c

Data passed from an internal function
New PSW: 3f9219ae14f9246622973724ace5cb66b190a4b5e86abf482fce5d7889e6aff870741d672ff78e7765fada25f15
0c70e5e61c13b5bcdec634d03830668348b5a7d06cf75f426259dcf804241eb2f4362d10f1ebf23a1aecca28072a3f38fb8a
39eba88c9f055e9e7ccabafcd8caed25d8b26f3726022973175545f77e4024bcbcc657081ea5d1f2baf5e9080cbb20696135
f2be8834c
Data from external function: 3f9219ae14f9246622973724ace5cb66b190a4b5e86abf482fce5d7889e6aff870741d6
72ff78e7765fada25f150c70e5e61c13b5bcdec634d03830668348b5a7d06cf75f426259dcf804241eb2f4362d10f1ebf23a
1aecca28072a3f38fb8a39eba88c9f055e9e7ccabafcd8caed25d8b26f3726022973175545f77e4024bcbcc657081ea5d1f2
baf5e9080cbb20696135f2be8834c

Have a look here to understand how bind works and here to understand the concept of this and context in javascript.

EDIT: In response to your latest, comment.

if you just wanted to pass the justCrypted from pbkdf2 to the var psw of User.prototype.save, you can use the synchronous version of the same method:

crypto.pbkdf2Sync(password, salt, iterations, keylen[, digest])

Your method will then look like:

User.prototype.save = function (fn){
    var user=this;
    var psw ;
    var crypto = require('crypto');
    var salt = crypto.randomBytes(50).toString('base64');
    psw = crypto.pbkdf2Sync(user.pswrd, salt, 10000, 150, 'sha512');
    var justCrypted = psw.toString('hex');
    console.log(justCrypted);
    ....
    ....
}

The important difference here is that this is an synchronous method and the code will wait for crypto.pbkdf2Sync to finish returning a value before it moves to the next line, thus following a sequential flow.

Hope that helps.

EDIT 2: Here is a little diagram of how async works:

enter image description here

Unfortunately, you just can't do it the way you want without using an external function or a synchronous function.

  • I get what you did, but I just wanted to pass the justCrypted from pbkdf2 to the var psw of User.prototype.save, not pass it in a completely different function like externalFunction . How can I edit your code to do that? Thanks – slevin Jan 8 '16 at 12:08
  • @slevin Please check the updated post with synchronous version of the pbkdf2 call. Let me know what you think. – MojoJojo Jan 8 '16 at 12:33
  • I got you. So there is no way to keep pbkdf2 asynchronous and pass the justCrypted to var psw in User.prototype.save and then pass the psw to the query, exactly because pbkdf2 is asynchronous. Well I was hoping that this or bind can put together a hack/solution. – slevin Jan 8 '16 at 14:13
  • @slevin: Spot on. This is the way asynchronous calls work. You'll either have to use a synchronous method or rely on a notification/communication mechanism to coordinate everything. Have added a diagram to explain the concept as well. – MojoJojo Jan 8 '16 at 14:52
  • Thank youvery much for your time, my friend. You helped me – slevin Jan 8 '16 at 15:49

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.