15

Is it possible to define your keywords in C#?
I mean something like

public important Form newform;

where important would be the new keyword. It would mean something like, for example, that if the type is null when compiling an error occurrs. So the example would produce an error. An example with no error would be

public important Form newform = form1;
10
  • 10
    Yes and no, yes you can do it, but not as you have shown. You would use attributes and a code processor like PostSharp, Fody, or CodeContracts. Dec 25, 2015 at 15:30
  • In the case of null checking, you could use code contracts.
    – Wai Ha Lee
    Dec 25, 2015 at 15:30
  • 2
    As Scott has mentioned, look for custom attributes. Keywords are directions for the compiler - unless you're writing your own!
    – kidshaw
    Dec 25, 2015 at 15:36
  • You could build your own version of Roslyn, or use attributes and write a code inspection. Dec 25, 2015 at 15:48
  • 1
    form1 can still be null. In general, such analysis is undecidable, you can't statically verify null references reliably. Dec 25, 2015 at 16:14

4 Answers 4

3

No, the compiler doesn't allow you to add keywords out of box.

That doesn't mean you can't accomplish what you want, but it's going to be non trivial. You're going to need to perform your own custom static code analysis.

Roslyn

One way to do it is via the new .NET Compiler Services (Roslyn) Code Analyzers. You can read this MSDN article to get started: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/dn879356.aspx and you'll end up with something that looks like this:

enter image description here

This will work from within Visual Studio, and you can generate at least Warnings, I would assume Errors as well (or you'll have to turn on "Treat Warnings as Errors").

Because you want to declaritively add the check to certain variables, you'll need to make use of Attributes:

/// <summary> Indicate a variable must be given a value 
/// in the same line it's declared </summary>
public class ImportantAttribute : Attribute {}

public class Program
{
   [Important]
   object thisShouldError;

   object thisIsFine;
}

Then when you write your Analyzer you'll need to check the variable declaration node to see if it's decorated with Important.

If you want this to work on a build server (or outside of VS), you might need to do some more work: Roslyn: workspace loads in console application but not in msbuild task

StyleCop

The easiest way is probably to use Code Analysis (ie StyleCop) to run Static Analysis Rule Sets against your code base:

enter image description here

You'll need to write your own Rule Set and I don't know if the Rule Sets will give you fidelity to be able to declare which variable declarations you want to force a check on, ie I don't know if you'll be able to mix & match this:

public class Program
{
   [Important]
   object thisShouldError;

   object thisIsFine;
}

Fody

Another approach is to use an IL weaving tool like Fody that lets you manipulate the IL of your application during compilation. AFAIK you can't directly generate compilation errors, but you might be able to add invalid IL that will in turn generate a compile time error.

So based on the same code as above, after a compilation pass with Fody you'd end up with code like:

public class Program
{
   [Important]
   object thisShouldError YouForgotToInitializeThisImportantVariable;

   object thisIsFine;
}

Custom Compiler

Microsoft did open source the C# compiler: https://github.com/dotnet/roslyn. So if you're feeling really ambitious, you can absolutely add in your own keywords in your own fork of the compiler. Of course then you'll essentially have your own language and it won't be able to compile on anything other than your custom compiler.

0

Short: No you can't.

Long: It is possible, but it it's probably never happening, as you would require for the C# team to add it, but that would require a lot of discussion and a lot of feasible uses for it.

0

Maybe you can simply use tools like ReSharper... To define new keyword only for finding uninitialized public variables sounds as bad idea.

2
  • That was only an example I wouldnt actually need that, still thanks for the help!
    – Ian H.
    Feb 12, 2016 at 21:54
  • 1
    You have to write in assembly language for 1-2 years as therapy against such ideas. Then current features of C# will look very powerful and useful :) And remember: if programming become very easy, the salaries will fall down which is bad!
    – i486
    Feb 12, 2016 at 21:58
0

No, you cannot create a new keyword in the way you have indicated. I suggest you take a look at this.

Create new keyword for C# automatic property

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.