14

I want to ask user a question, and let him sign up only if the user answers my question correctly. I searched devise how-to acticles but my case doesn't seem to be there.

Is there an idiomatic way to deal with this situation?

The first thought might be to use javascript, but answers are stored in LDAP, and I expect it will be easier to deal with this in rails.

I was also thinking about disabling /users/sign_up route, invoke the action (devise/registration#new) manually and render the view (devise/registration/new).

Another way I can think of, is to run a background daemon, which will collect session id, where user answered the questions correctly. On correct answer user will be redirected to the publicly available sign up page, which will get check user's session id with the daemon.

  • To not write on everybody's answer, encrypted sessions are not the solution, cookie data was not encrypted for years in Rails not because it was technically difficult but because of the fear that programmers might use it to secure data on the client which is a bad bad practice, github.com/rails/rails/issues/3955#issuecomment-3116588 Failure to do this properly will result in a stolen cookie being able to allow unauthorized access to the system. So far every answer except 1 was depending on this to implement "secure access" and would open up the system to a stolen cookie – bbozo Jan 3 '16 at 0:08
  • Is securing registrations#new with the condition the only criteria ? What about registrations#create ? – Thong Kuah Jan 3 '16 at 10:59
  • Every check you do on #new needs to be done on #create too :) the #create is actually much more important because it is the one that actually creates the user, failing to block the user our of #new would only allow the user to see the form, but not do any harm, failing to block the user out of #create would result in the user gaining access of the system even without access to #new – bbozo Jan 4 '16 at 19:15
  • And please please stop upvoting answers with gaping security holes inside, three months from now somebody will copy/paste it assuming it's actually the best possible thing to do – bbozo Jan 4 '16 at 19:16
4

To improve on security of previous suggestions, the best one seems to be by coreyward, but it's insecure (regardless if cookies are encrypted or not - see my comment on the OP)

# app/controllers/preauth_controller.rb
def new
end

def create
  if params[:answer] == 'correct answer'
    # Create a secret value, the `token`, we will share it to the client
    # through the `session` and store it on the server in `Rails.cache`
    # (or you can use the database if you like)
    #
    # The fact that this token expires (by default) in 15 minutes is
    # a bonus, it will secure the system against later use of a stolen
    # cookie. The token is also secure against brute force attack
    @token = SecureRandom.base64
    session[:preauthorization_token] = @token
    Rails.cache.write("users/preauthorization_tokens/#{@token}", "OK")
    redirect_to sign_up_path
  else
    flash[:error] = 'Incorrect answer'
    render :new
  end
end


# app/controllers/users_controller.rb
before_filter :verify_preauth, only: [:new, :create]

def verify_preauth
  # When we approve preauthorization we confirm that the
  # `token` is known to the client, if the client knows the token
  # let him sign up, else make him go away
  token = session[:preauthorization_token]
  redirect_to new_preauth_path unless token and Rails.cache.read("users/preauthorization_tokens/#{token}") == "OK"
end

Optional things to do / play with....

  1. delete the successfully used Rails.cache entry when user is created
  2. play with :expires_in settings if you want, you generally want it as short as possible and as long as needed :) but the rails default of 15 minutes is pretty good
  3. there are nicer ways of going around this and similar security issues with cookies - namely you can create a server_session object which does basically the same as session but stores the data in Rails.cache with a random expirable token stored in session used to access the cache entry in much the same way we do here
  4. simply go to server-side sessions and don't worry about session security, but this means longer response times due to your Rails.cache round trip (redis, memcache, AR, ...)
  5. instead of OK into the cache value you can store a hash of values, if you need more data, safely stored on the host, to work this out
  6. ...
  • This is unnecessarily complex and is still vulnerable to a replay attack, so it's not any more secure. Rails.cache.write does not have a default expiration of 15 minutes (it varies with the implementation). If you were concerned with the security of the system, you'd use a nonce, ensure the page is encrypted appropriately, and the sensitive field is displayed as a password to prevent snooping (of both kinds). But thanks for all the downvotes! – coreyward Jan 4 '16 at 18:52
  • @coreyward, replay attack is only theoretically possible in the 15 minute window and brute forcing the digest in that time is practically impossible, nonce would only help in the case when your hosts cookie secret is compromised at which point this issues is the least of your problems, and ofc. always obliged to downvote answers which allow unauthorized login <3 – bbozo Jan 4 '16 at 19:19
6
+100

Assuming you have cookie data signed (as is the default in Rails 3), you could do as you say and use the session:

# app/controllers/preauth_controller.rb
def new
end

def create
  if params[:answer] == 'correct answer'
    session[:preauthorized] = true
    redirect_to sign_up_path
  end
  flash[:error] = 'Incorrect answer'
  render :new
end


# app/controllers/users_controller.rb
before_filter :verify_preauth, only: [:new, :create]

def verify_preauth
  redirect_to new_preauth_path unless session[:preauthorized]
end

If cookie data is not signed, however, the preauthorized key can be tampered with by the client and thus should not be trusted.

Provided that your page is encrypted in transit with HTTPS via TLS and you don't have any XSS vulnerabilities present, this should be sufficiently secure for your needs. If you feel this is a particularly sensitive piece of code, you would want more than the passing thoughts of a StackOverflow user to guide and implement a comprehensive approach to securing your application.

  • If you need to assume that cookie data is encrypted you are doing it wrong. Cookie data was not encrypted for years in Rails not because it was technically difficult but because of the fear that programmers might use it to secure data on the client which is a bad bad practice – bbozo Jan 2 '16 at 23:31
  • @bbozo The “fear” regarding encrypting cookie data is that novice developers won't understand the security concerns still present with encrypted cookies, namely hijacking/fixation and replays. I've updated my answer to reflect that encryption is not actually necessary, and that the code would be as secure with Rails 3's signed cookies. – coreyward Jan 4 '16 at 19:01
  • There's also the fact that if you don't add extra data into the cookie it will allow anybody access to the system sign up :P – bbozo Jan 4 '16 at 19:13
4

I have a little different approach.

  1. Show the question,receive the response and verify it.
  2. Set the encrypted session.
  3. Override the devise's registration controller with this so that even if they visit the url directly and tried signing up they won't be able to

    #app/controllers/registration_controller.rb
    class RegistrationsController < Devise::RegistrationsController
     before_filter :check_answered_or_not,only:[:create,:new]
      def check_answered_or_not
       if not session[:answered]==true
          redirect_to question_path
       end
      end
      private
      def sign_up_params
        params.require(:user).permit(:name,:phone,:password,:password_confirmation,:email)
      end
      def account_update_params
         params.require(:user).permit(:name,:phone,:password,:password_confirmation,:email,:current_password)
     end
    end
    

my 2cents

  • Encrypted cookies should not be trusted to keep data you don't want to be decrypted/forged by the client or a man in the middle github.com/rails/rails/issues/3955#issuecomment-3116588, also consider that owning one stolen cookie with answered = true would result in an immediate and reproducible ability to sign up for anybody owning the cookie – bbozo Jan 3 '16 at 0:00
3

So... May be it should be in module Validatable?

  1. Generate Validatables controler with this Tools
  2. Customize this controller something like this: (Code of this module You could see This)

...

base.class_eval do
          validates_presence_of   :email, if: :email_required?
          validates_uniqueness_of :email, allow_blank: true, if: :email_changed?
          validates_format_of     :email, with: email_regexp, allow_blank: true, if: :email_changed?

          validates_presence_of     :password, if: :password_required?
          validates_confirmation_of :password, if: :password_required?
          validates_length_of       :password, within: password_length, allow_blank: true

          validates_presence_of     :question, if: :question_required?
          validates_format_of       :question, with: answered_regexp, if: :answered_changed?          
        end
      end

...
  def email_required?
    true
  end
  def question_required?
    true
  end

This is not complied solution, but I hope it help You...

  • This answer plus customising the devise view for the signup page to include the question + answer field seems like the the best bet... – Thong Kuah Jan 3 '16 at 11:01
  • e.g. rails generate devise:views -v registrations, then modify the views – Thong Kuah Jan 3 '16 at 11:02
  • Sure! We should customize Registration AND Validation AND suitable Views too. What is my idea? Do Registration module check what user fill in its fields? No. It is Validation module check 'Is its corect?' and it will conducted using suitable sophisticated algorithms... On 'registration' side we ask question, user fills the field with the answer and ... on 'validation' side we check the validity of all fields – Сергій Назаревич Jan 5 '16 at 15:08
1

I think the easiest way to do it is to change default devise controller with custom one with before_action in it:

# routes.rb
devise_for :users, :controllers => {:registrations => "registrations"}

With following controller implementation:

# app/controllers/registrations_controller.rb
class RegistrationsController < Devise::RegistrationsController
  before_action :check_answers, only: :new # :new action is responsible for :sign_up route

  private

  def check_answers
    unless session[:gave_answers]
      redirect_to ask_questions_path
      false
    end
  end
end 

And setting session like this:

# somewhere in questions controller:
if answers_correct?
  session[:gave_answers] = true
  redirect_to new_registration_path
end

As soon as this controller inherits from Devise::RegistrationsController all behavior stays default except checking answers functionality.

Regarding your question about idiomatic way - this approach was described in official documentation. Your app - your logic, it's OK.

UPDATE:

In comments @bbozo pointed on certain security issues with this and other answers. To make it more securely, you could add expiration time and set some random secret token (more information in comments).

  • You can not trust session to keep data that would allow access to somebody's account – bbozo Jan 3 '16 at 0:03
  • Session always are used to keep current user id and data associated with current session and that's why stealing user's cookies lets attacker act from victim's name. Quote from Rails guides: "Hence, the cookie serves as temporary authentication for the web application. Anyone who seizes a cookie from someone else, may use the web application as this user - with possibly severe consequences.". – hedgesky Jan 3 '16 at 8:10
  • User sessions are expireable, so the usefulness of the cookie is time limited and scoped to a single user of the system. With this, and almost all other answes, the session is from a user that is not logged in, so there is no user ID in it, just a big sign "let me in" for anybody to use – bbozo Jan 3 '16 at 8:18
  • But where could you store information not related to any existing user? About sessions expiration: there is a nice answer on SO about it: stackoverflow.com/questions/17480487/rails-4-session-expiry. With this approach you coul manually limit freshness of user's answers to, for example, 15 minutes. – hedgesky Jan 3 '16 at 8:31
  • 1
    Adding only hash to cookie (without timeout) won't help if attacker steal whole cookie, so setting both hash and timeout is more safely. But you are right in other points. Nice discussion! – hedgesky Jan 3 '16 at 10:14

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