3

I am using fast-csv to iterate over a CSV file using a stream. For each row of the CSV file, I want to create a job in redis, for which I use kue. Parsing a row is synchronous function. The whole thing looks like this:

var csvStream = fastCsv(_config.csvOptions)
  .on('data', function(data) {
    var stream = this;
    stream.pause();

    var payload = parseRow(data, _config);
    console.log(payload); // the payload is always printed to the console

    var job = kue.create('csv-row', {
        payload: payload
      })
      .save(function(err) {
        if (!err) console.log('Enqueued at ' + job.id);
        else console.log('Redis error ' + JSON.stringify(err));

        stream.resume();
      });
  })
  .on('end', function() {
    callback(); // this ends my parsing
  });

The simple console.log(payload); shows for every row of my CSV file, however the job is not created. I.e., none of the outputs in the callback of save are being printed, and the job is not in my redis.

I assume, because it's the last row of the CSV file, the stream already emits end and so the last kue.create() cannot be executed before the process terminates?

Is there a way to halt the stream's end until kue is done?

7
+50

You can solve this problem using async library. You can use the below pattern for any streams.

var AsyncLib = require('async');

var worker = function (payload, cb) {
    //do something with payload and call callback
    return cb();
};

var concurrency = 5;
var streamQueue = AsyncLib.queue(worker, concurrency);

var stream = //some readable stream;

stream.on('data', function(data) {
    //no need to pause and resume
    var payload = '//some payload';
    streamQueue.push(payload);
})
.on('end', function() {
    //register drain event on end and callback
    streamQueue.drain = function () {
        callback();
    };
});
7
  • 1
    But why? I see that this solves the problem, but now am adding the items to a queue just to add them to another queue. Is there no cleaner way to call an async function in a stream?
    – Julian
    Jan 5 '16 at 14:21
  • The task which we perform on "data" event synchronous or asynchronous might take longer and while we in process the "end" event might occur and invoke the callback. To avoid this situation we need some sought of event which will indicate that data processing is complete. You could look for similar event "drain" on the queue you are using, if none available may be you should request the developer to add support for it.
    – kkites
    Jan 5 '16 at 16:17
  • Okay so there's really no way to actually process all objects of a stream without buffering them somewhere? The problem is now, that I am not able to detect any processing errors in time. Would it make sense to create my own stream to pipe into the operation?
    – Julian
    Jan 5 '16 at 17:12
  • You could try that, or slow down the stream read until you process the payload. This might slow down the overall process. Evaluate based on the cost of the read vs process. You could also provide callback to async queue push method to work on errors and stop read if you want to. Please check the documentation for options.
    – kkites
    Jan 6 '16 at 2:04
  • The problem I see with this solution is that you're consuming all data from the readable stream into a buffer, which IMO is the antithesis of a stream. If your .on('data', handler) is not ready to deal with additional data then it should pause the stream right ?
    – Mr5o1
    Aug 31 '16 at 22:26
4

I have just found myself in the same situation. And I resolved it with pattern similar to sync.WaitGroup from Go language.

In its simplest form this will look like (function will return Promise):

function process() {
    const locker = {
        items: 0,
        resolve: null,
        lock: function() { this.items++ },
        unlock: function() {
            if (this.items > 0) this.items--;
            if (this.items === 0) {
                this.resolve()
                this.resolve = null
            }
        },
    };
    return new Promise(function(resolve, reject) {
        locker.resolve = resolve;
        locker.lock();

        fastCsv(_config.csvOptions)
        .on('end', function() { locker.unlock(); })
        .on('data', function(data) {
            locker.lock();
            const payload = parseRow(data, _config);
            kue.create('csv-row', { payload: payload })
                .save(function(err) {
                    if (!err) console.log('Enqueued at ' + job.id);
                    else console.log('Redis error ' + JSON.stringify(err));
                    locker.unlock();
                });
        });

    });
}

process().then(function () {
    console.log('Now ALL data processed!');
});

In real application you can extract locker to distinct class/module, add error handling, etc... But the principle is the same – wait until not only the stream is empty but also all nonblocking operations created in it are finished.

2
  • Probably not best to call the function process for anyone who comes across this one. It overwrites the native process object and can cause some weirdness if you're using process.stdin or something. processStream might be better
    – yjimk
    Jan 31 '18 at 11:12
  • @yjimk Umm, you are right. I hope that people understand that this is only an example. In real life process is a very bad name for a function because it totally lacks semantic.
    – user2266462
    Jan 31 '18 at 20:13

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