8

I need to create something like the image below:

enter image description here

Where:

  • The black background represents a element on the page, header for example
  • The cyan background represents the overall background underneath the black one
  • the black background element has to be treated like a single element, because it will have a pattern overlay on top of it, that will have to stay within the borders of the black element, and not show up outside of it

It would be very easy, to just create the black element with some :pseudo-elements, however that pattern on top of it has brought the whole thing to a standstill.

I've been reading about clip-path prop. but I'm not sure I would be able to create a complex clip like this one (or maybe it seems complex to me).

The whole thing will be used on a iOS app, and so far it seems this clip-path property would be compatible with it. Another thing to mention, the black element will have a fixed height, but has to be 100% width of its parent. I've figured I'd get away with using svg instead, but as it needs to be a fixed height, it seems like its distorting when its stretched.


UPDATE: The right side has to stay the same width, I've figured maybe using a two svgs inside a <g> tag and absolute position them, one would be fluid and the other would have a fixed width. However, I'm not sure if a filter would cover both of them, or if the filter can be applied at all to a <g> tag, inside a svg

SVG sample below:

body {
  background: cyan;
}
svg {
  min-width: 100%;
  height: 80px;
}
<svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" version="1.1" viewBox="0 0 452 170" preserveAspectRatio="none">
  <rect x="1" y="14" width="438" height="142" />
  <path d="M0 0v170h452V0H0zM448 166H4V4h444V166z" />
  <rect y="14" width="438" height="142" />
</svg>

Any tips or pointers are much appreciated!

1
  • 1
    @Harry ok, sounds good, thanks!
    – RGLSV
    Commented Dec 27, 2015 at 18:22

2 Answers 2

6

May be it would be a better solution go with masking ?

#test {
  font-size: 100px;
  position: relative;
  display: inline-block;
  margin: 40px;
}

#test:after {
  content: "";
  position: absolute;
  left: 0px;
  right: 0px;
  top: 0px;
  bottom: 0px;
  z-index: -1;
  background: repeating-linear-gradient(45deg, lightblue, tomato 100px);
  -webkit-mask-image: linear-gradient(red, red),
                    linear-gradient(red, red), 
                    linear-gradient(red, red), 
                    linear-gradient(red, red), 
                    linear-gradient(red, red), 
                    linear-gradient(transparent, transparent);
  -webkit-mask-size: 5% 100%, 5% 100%, 100% 5%, 100% 5%, 80% 80%;
  -webkit-mask-position: left top, right top, center top, center bottom, center center ;
  -webkit-mask-repeat: no-repeat;
}

body {
  background-color: lightgreen;
}
<div id="test">Transparent frame</div>

A fixed width approach

replace the dimensions of the width of the borders with a fixed value in pixels. Use calc for the inner rectangle.

body, html {
    width: 90%;
  position: relative;
}

#test {
  font-size: 100px;
  position: relative;
  display: inline-block;
  margin: 40px;
  width: 100%;
  height: 40%;
}

#test:after {
  content: "";
  position: absolute;
  left: 0px;
  right: 0px;
  top: 0px;
  bottom: 0px;
  z-index: -1;
  background: repeating-linear-gradient(45deg, lightblue, tomato 100px);
  -webkit-mask-image: linear-gradient(red, red),
                    linear-gradient(red, red), 
                    linear-gradient(red, red), 
                    linear-gradient(red, red), 
                    linear-gradient(red, red), 
                    linear-gradient(transparent, transparent);
  -webkit-mask-size: 10px 100%, 10px 100%, 100% 10px, 100% 10px, calc(100% - 40px) calc(100% - 40px);
  -webkit-mask-position: left top, right top, center top, center bottom, center center ;
  -webkit-mask-repeat: no-repeat;
}

body {
  background-color: lightgreen;
}
<div id="test">Transparent frame</div>

An eliptical example

#test {
  font-size: 100px;
  position: relative;
  display: inline-block;
  margin: 40px;
  border-radius: 50%;
}

#test:after {
  content: "";
  position: absolute;
  left: 0px;
  right: 0px;
  top: 0px;
  bottom: 0px;
  z-index: -1;
  border-radius: 50%;
  background: repeating-linear-gradient(45deg, lightblue, tomato 100px);
  -webkit-mask-image: radial-gradient(ellipse, red 55%, transparent 56%, transparent 65%, red 66%);
}

body {
  background: lightgreen;
}
<div id="test">Transparent frame</div>

7
  • I think this is the second time we've both answered the same question within a matter of minutes. Nice approach :)
    – Harry
    Commented Dec 26, 2015 at 9:42
  • I think that I usually answer first because your answers are longer ... Probably you started your answer before I did.
    – vals
    Commented Dec 26, 2015 at 10:02
  • Probably may have @vals. I am always very verbose (probably comes from years of writing spec documents) but your code takes for itself :)
    – Harry
    Commented Dec 26, 2015 at 10:07
  • Awesome answer, thanks for the input, however, I need the right / left side to stay the same width, and not increase on resize; I'm not sure if its at all possible, without using what @Harry did with JS; Maybe a two separate svgs or masks would work, but I'm not sure if I can apply after it that pattern on top of both of them. Anyway thanks again!
    – RGLSV
    Commented Dec 26, 2015 at 17:25
  • 1
    It's just the background-image syntax, but changing the first part of the property name. I have added an eliptical example. Happy that it helped !
    – vals
    Commented Dec 27, 2015 at 18:37
6

This can be achieved by making use of the approach described by Ana in this CSS Tricks article.

Using CSS Clip-path:

All we need to do is use a polygon for clipping like in the below snippet and apply it on the container. Such a path would show the background image in the gap between the outermost box and the middle box, hide or clip the background image between the middle box and the innermost box.

div {
  height: 200px;
  width: 100%;
  background: url(http://lorempixel.com/800/200/abstract/6);
}
#css-pattern {
  -webkit-clip-path: polygon(0% 0%, 100% 0%, 100% 100%, 0% 100%, 0px 0px, 20px 20px, 20px calc(100% - 20px), calc(100% - 20px) calc(100% - 20px), calc(100% - 20px) 20px, 20px 20px, 40px 40px, 40px calc(100% - 40px), calc(100% - 40px) calc(100% - 40px), calc(100% - 40px) 40px, 40px 40px);
  clip-path: polygon(0% 0%, 100% 0%, 100% 100%, 0% 100%, 0px 0px, 20px 20px, 20px calc(100% - 20px), calc(100% - 20px) calc(100% - 20px), calc(100% - 20px) 20px, 20px 20px, 40px 40px, 40px calc(100% - 40px), calc(100% - 40px) calc(100% - 40px), calc(100% - 40px) 40px, 40px 40px);
}

/* just for demo */

body {
  background: radial-gradient(circle at center, aliceblue, mediumslateblue);
  min-height: 100vh;
}
<h3>Pure CSS Clip-path with fixed width gap on all 4 sides</h3>
<div id='css-pattern'></div>


Using SVG Clip-path:

SVG clip-path offers better browser support than the CSS version as it is supported by Firefox too. All we need to do is create a path like in the below snippet and use it for clipping the container.

svg path {
  fill: transparent;
  stroke: black;
}

/* Just for fun */

path {
  animation: draw 5s linear;
  stroke-dasharray: 4450;
}
@keyframes draw {
  from {
    stroke-dashoffset: -4450;
  }
  to {
    stroke-dashoffset: 0;
  }
}
<svg width='600px' height='200px'>
  <path d='M0,0 600,0 600,200 0,200 0,0 20,20 20,180 580,180 580,20 20,20 40,40 40,160 560,160 560,40 40,40 z' />
</svg>

SVG implementation would have been far easier if the dimensions of your container were static. Since they are not static, fraction values cannot be used as the value would differ based on the actual width of the element (whatever 100% corresponds to). Say for example, a fraction value of 0.2 would mean 40px for a 200px wide element and would mean 80px for a 400px wide element. You can see how this affects the output in the snippet's first sample.

One way to overcome this would be to make use of JavaScript (or any other scripting library that you prefer), get the actual calculated width of the element in pixels and the calculate the coordinate values of the path's d attribute based on it. The second sample in the below snippet uses this method.

Note: Clip-path is not supported by IE but since you are creating an iOS app, I think this should not be a major concern for you.

window.onload = function() {
  setPathCoords();
};
window.onresize = function() {
  setPathCoords();
};

function setPathCoords() {
  var output = [],
    borderWidth = '20';
  var el = document.getElementById('percentage-pattern'),
    path = document.querySelector('#clipper2 > path'),
    origPath = 'M0,0 1,0 1,1 0,1 0,0 ';
  height = el.clientHeight;
  width = el.clientWidth;

  for (var x = 1; x < 3; x++) {
    point1 = (borderWidth * x) / width + "," + (borderWidth * x) / height;
    point2 = (borderWidth * x) / width + "," + (height - (borderWidth * x)) / height;
    point3 = (width - (borderWidth * x)) / width + "," + (height - (borderWidth * x)) / height;
    point4 = (width - (borderWidth * x)) / width + "," + (borderWidth * x) / height;

    output.push(point1);
    output.push(point2);
    output.push(point3);
    output.push(point4);
    output.push(point1);
  }
  document.querySelector('#clipper2 > path').setAttribute('d', origPath + output.join(' ') + 'z');
}
div {
  height: 200px;
  width: 100%;
  background: url(http://lorempixel.com/800/200/abstract/6);
}
#percentage-pattern {
  -webkit-clip-path: url(#clipper);
  clip-path: url(#clipper);
}
#js-pattern {
  -webkit-clip-path: url(#clipper2);
  clip-path: url(#clipper2);
}

/* just for demo */

body {
  background: radial-gradient(circle at center, aliceblue, mediumslateblue);
  min-height: 100vh;
}
<svg width='0' height='0'>
  <defs>
    <clipPath id='clipper' clipPathUnits='objectBoundingBox'>
      <path d='M0,0 1,0 1,1 0,1 0,0 0.1,0.1 0.1,0.9 0.9,0.9 0.9,0.1 0.1,0.1 0.2,0.2 0.2,0.8 0.8,0.8 0.8,0.2 0.2,0.2z' />
    </clipPath>
    <clipPath id='clipper2' clipPathUnits='objectBoundingBox'>
      <path d='M0,0 1,0 1,1 0,1 0,0 ' />
    </clipPath>
  </defs>
</svg>

<h3>Output with JS</h3>
<div id='js-pattern'></div>
<h3>Pure SVG Clip-path</h3>
<div id='percentage-pattern'></div>

6
  • 1
    It's a pitty Ana is no longer active here. I liked it's posts.
    – vals
    Commented Dec 26, 2015 at 10:03
  • 1
    @Harry Yeah I was looking at it right now, I was thinking of using two svgs, group using <g> tag and and set them both absolutely positioned, one with fluid width, and the other(right side for example) with a fixed width, but I'm not sure if you could add a filter on top of a group of svg, my clip-path / svg / masking skills havent kicked in yet :). Anyway thanks for the great answer!
    – RGLSV
    Commented Dec 26, 2015 at 17:21
  • 1
    @Harry Yeah, I figured I'd put all the svg nasty stuff on top of the page, hide it and then just reference it though the pages, with use tag or something like that; but anyway thanks again, I'll wait a bit for another opinion, but if nothing new shows up, this one goes to you. Thanks!
    – RGLSV
    Commented Dec 26, 2015 at 17:45
  • 1
    @Crispy-George: I have added a method with pure CSS also. Though I mentioned it in my answer, I forgot that only Webkit support should be enough for you and so SVG is not at all required. With pure CSS clip, we can use calc (like in vals' answer).
    – Harry
    Commented Dec 27, 2015 at 16:01
  • 1
    @Harry thanks for all the help, in the end I've ended up combining some of your solution and @vals solution aswell; in the end, my main missing link in this problem, was the calc approach, and after this, I've adapted both of your solutions with what I needed, and bam, problem solved; I may add a extra answer on this later on, maybe someone else could use this approach aswell. thanks again
    – RGLSV
    Commented Dec 27, 2015 at 18:27

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