5

This regex problem is stumping me...

I want to split a string by usage of one of the four basic mathematical operations (+, -, /, *), unless it exists within brackets.

Full:
'x^2 * ln(sin(x^2 + y^2)) + 8^(2*9)'

Full Goal:
['x^2', 'ln(sin(x^2 + y^2))', '8^(2*9)']

Simplified Problem:
'x^2 * sin(x^2 + y^2) + 8^(2*9)'

Simplified Goal:
['x^2', 'sin(x^2 + y^2)', '8^(2*9)']

A solution to either the Full or Simplified Problem would work.

4
  • 1
    what if the brackets are more than one depth deep? Dec 26, 2015 at 5:24
  • @AvinashRaj Good catch. I copied over my problem incorrectly from my IDE. I've edited the question to reflect the true problem.
    – lnNoam
    Dec 26, 2015 at 5:26
  • 1
    then this question is not solvable using default re module.. Dec 26, 2015 at 5:27
  • 1
    This can help stackoverflow.com/questions/2595254/…
    – Learner
    Dec 26, 2015 at 6:49

2 Answers 2

3

Regex cannot be used to reliably solve this issue. Instead, consider using a very simple state machine where you track whether you are inside braces to determine whether you should split on the math operator. Here is a very quick attempt that appears to work for your input.

math_ops = {'+', '-', '*', '/'}

def parse(inval):
    groups = []
    braces = 0
    part = ''
    for c in f:
        # We add to braces count 
        if c == '(':
            braces += 1
        # We subtract from braces count
        elif c == ')':
            braces -= 1
        # If we are at a math symbol and our brace count is 0, we have a complete part.
        if c in math_ops and braces == 0:
            groups.append(part.strip())
            part = ''
            continue
        part += c
    if part:
        groups.append(part)
    return groups

For your two examples the output is:

['x^2', 'ln(sin(x^2 + y^2))', ' 8^(2*9)']
['x^2', 'sin(x^2 + y^2)', ' 8^(2*9)']
2

Simplified problem

def split(string):
    return re.findall(r'(?:[^+\-*/]|\(.*\))+', string)

You don't mention stripping spaces, but your example does. If that is desired,

def split(string):
    return re.findall(r'(?! )(?:[^+\-*/]|\(.*\))+(?<! )', string)

Full problem

This is a classic example of non-regular language, i.e. not computable by a finite state machine, which is what regular expressions are. Generally speaking, if elements can be nested (e.g. with parens), a regular expression is an insufficient computation model. You need a pushdown automaton, or a full-blown Turing complete language, like Python.

def split(string):
    results = []
    depth = 0
    result = ''
    for c in string + '+':
        if c == '(':
            depth += 1
        elif c == ')':
            depth -= 1
        elif not depth and c in {'+', '-', '*', '/'}:
            results.append(result.strip())
            result = ''
            continue
        result += c
    return results
2
  • FYI, you need to append the character in case of hitting a brace as well or the braces are stripped from the segments in results.
    – sberry
    Dec 26, 2015 at 6:30
  • 1
    And not to be pedantic, but there is no trim() method on Python str. The method you are looking for is strip()
    – sberry
    Dec 26, 2015 at 6:41

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.