1

How can I extract number of years, months, and days since a date in Swift.

So far I have the follow code in a class file named DatePickerController.

class DatePickerController: UIViewController {

    @IBOutlet var datePicker:UIDatePicker!
    @IBOutlet var dateDisplay: UILabel!

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()

        // Do any additional setup after loading the view.
    }

    override func didReceiveMemoryWarning() {
        super.didReceiveMemoryWarning()
        // Dispose of any resources that can be recreated.
    }

    @IBAction func datePickerChanged(sender: AnyObject) {
        setDate()
    }

    let dateFormatter = NSDateFormatter()

    // MARK: - Date Format
    func setDate() {
        dateFormatter.dateStyle = NSDateFormatterStyle.ShortStyle
        dateDisplay.text = dateFormatter.stringFromDate(datePicker.date)
    }

}

I will create separate UILables for year, month, and day right.

2

Like you said, you will need UILabel's for each of the date components. You can then extract the components using custom date formatting strings instead of using NSDateFormatterStye.ShortStyle. This gives you the most flexibility. The formatting strings follow a unicode standard.

I can't test the code in the context of your project, but if you add the labels and connect them correctly to Xcode, I believe that this code will do exactly what you want:

class DatePickerController: UIViewController {

  @IBOutlet var datePicker:UIDatePicker!
  @IBOutlet var dayDisplay: UILabel!
  @IBOutlet var monthDisplay: UILabel!
  @IBOutlet var yearDisplay: UILabel!

  override func viewDidLoad() {
    super.viewDidLoad()

    // Do any additional setup after loading the view.
  }

  override func didReceiveMemoryWarning() {
    super.didReceiveMemoryWarning()
    // Dispose of any resources that can be recreated.
  }

  @IBAction func datePickerChanged(sender: AnyObject) {
    setDate()
  }

  let dateFormatter = NSDateFormatter()

  // MARK: - Date Format
  func setDate() {
    dateFormatter.dateFormat = "dd"
    dayDisplay.text = dateFormatter.stringFromDate(datePicker.date)
    dateFormatter.dateFormat = "MM"
    monthDisplay.text = dateFormatter.stringFromDate(datePicker.date)
    dateFormatter.dateFormat = "yyyy"
    yearDisplay.text = dateFormatter.stringFromDate(datePicker.date)
  }

}
| improve this answer | |
  • I need to do the storyboard work, but this code "prints" the right out put. Thanks @hashemi – WebRuin Dec 26 '15 at 19:15
  • I am getting "Fatal error: unexpectedly found nil while unwrapping an Optional values" for dayDisplay.text = dateFormatter.stringFromDate(datePicker.date). I thinks the nil is coming from the date picker – WebRuin Dec 26 '15 at 20:12
  • I bet either dayDisplay or datePicker are not connected to the correct component in interface builder. – hashemi Dec 26 '15 at 21:22
2

You can use NSCalendar to get the NSDateComponents between two dates. In Swift 3:

let components = Calendar.current.dateComponents([.day, .month, .year], from: date1, to: date2)
let dayString = "\(components.day!)"
let monthString = "\(components.month!)"
let yearString = "\(components.year!)"

Or in Swift 2:

let components = NSCalendar.currentCalendar().components([.Day, .Month, .Year], fromDate: date1, toDate: date2, options: [])
let dayString = "\(components.day)"
let monthString = "\(components.month)"
let yearString = "\(components.year)"

Perhaps easier, if you'd like to have a single string that represents the elapsed time between these two dates, you'd use NSDateComponentsFormatter, e.g., in Swift 3:

let formatter = DateComponentsFormatter()
formatter.allowedUnits = [.day, .month, .year]
formatter.unitsStyle = .full
let string = formatter.string(from: date1, to: date2)

Or in Swift 2:

let formatter = NSDateComponentsFormatter()
formatter.allowedUnits = [.Day, .Month, .Year]
formatter.unitsStyle = .Full
let string = formatter.stringFromDate(date1, toDate: date2)

This string is localized, too.

| improve this answer | |
0

You can use NSDateComponents to retrieve year, month and day by using method components(fromDate: toDate: options:) of NSCalender

Example

let date = NSDate(timeIntervalSinceNow: -123123123)

extension NSDate {
    func intereval(date:NSDate) -> (year: Int, month:Int, day:Int) {
        let calender = NSCalendar.currentCalendar()

       let components = calender.components([.Year, .Month, .Day], fromDate: date, toDate: self, options:.MatchStrictly)
        return (components.year, components.month, components.day)
    }
}

let component = NSDate().intereval(date)

print(component.year)
print(component.month)
print(component.day)
| improve this answer | |
0
import Foundation

let now = NSDate()
now.description.characters.split {
    " -".characters.contains($0)
}.enumerate().forEach {
    print($0.0,String($0.1))
}
/*
0 2015
1 12
2 26
3 19:34:33
4 +0000
*/
| improve this answer | |
  • That works in a pinch but be careful as date description formatting could change, for example depending on locale or changes to the APIs. That could break your code in weird or unexpected ways. – hashemi Dec 26 '15 at 21:26
  • @hashemi by the way, NSCalendar API could change too (is it locale independent??), as all others API. description is part of language and very stabile comparing it to rest of the language. and is also well documented – user3441734 Dec 27 '15 at 5:01
  • sorry I can't come up with a concrete example but you can refer to Apple's documentation of NSDate.description where it specifically says that "The representation is useful for debugging only." and then directs you to all the other ways you can get a date representation in a reliable way. developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/Cocoa/Reference/… – hashemi Dec 27 '15 at 5:02
  • @hashemi i see your point, and you are right. description property is used in Swift very often and in the case apple will decide to change default description property behavior, you can 'override' it by implementing CustomStringConvertible protocol as an extension. – user3441734 Dec 27 '15 at 5:13
  • Bingo. I'm not saying this code doesn't work or that it will stop working. It's just a caveat. Cheers. – hashemi Dec 27 '15 at 5:15

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