4

Let's say I've defined such a protocol:

protocol EuclideanPoint {
    func distance(other: Self) -> Double
    func dimension() -> UInt
}

Now I'd like to extend [Float] and [Double] to adopt that protocol.

But the following code:

extension [Float]: EuclideanPoint {
    func distance(other: [Float]) {
        return Double(zip(self, other).map{a, b in pow(a-b,2)}.reduce(0, combine: +))
    }
    func dimension() {
        return UInt(self.count)
    }
}

is invalid because of the error

error: constrained extension must be declared on the unspecialized generic type 'Array' with constraints specified by a 'where' clause

I found similar questions (like this), but the suggested solution is to use extension CollectionType where Generator.Element == S { ... }, but in this context it leads to the error:

error: protocol 'CollectionType' can only be used as a generic constraint because it has Self or associated type requirements

Is there any solution to this?

EDIT:

using the proposed solution:

protocol DoubleConvertibleType {
    var doubleValue: Double { get }
}

extension Double : DoubleConvertibleType { var doubleValue: Double { return self         } }
extension Float  : DoubleConvertibleType { var doubleValue: Double { return Double(self) } }
extension CGFloat: DoubleConvertibleType { var doubleValue: Double { return Double(self) } }

extension Array where Element : DoubleConvertibleType {
    func distance(other: Array) -> Double {
        return Double(zip(self, other).map{ pow($0.0.doubleValue - $0.1.doubleValue, 2) }.reduce(0, combine: +))
    }

    func dimension() -> UInt {
        return UInt(self.count)
    }
}

gives [Double] and [Float] the .distance() and .dimension() methods. Yet [Double] or [Float] cannot be used in place of something that is required to conform to the EuclideanPoint protocol, producing the error:

error: type '[Double]' does not conform to protocol 'EuclideanPoint'

1

EDITED


The following solution is somewhat generic, conforms to protocol EuclidianPoint, and is based upon two assumptions:

  • That we're allowed to include a generic type constraint for your blueprint for method distance in your EuclideanPoint protocol, and that, instead of argument type being Self, we'll use a generic ([T]). We will, however, ascertain (at compile time) that [T] is of the same type as Self (and here, Self of [Double], [Float] or [Int] type), and ascertain that [T] conforms to the protocol EuclidianPoint.

  • That you're ok that we leave functional programming techniques such as .map and .reduce out of this specific application, and focus only on attaining a "generic array adopted to euclidian protocol". These .map, .reduce etc feats in Swift are indeed neat and useful, but are in many applications just wrappers for behind-the-hood for-loops, so you won't lose any performance over doing things in a manual imperative style. In fact, .reduce is known to perform quite non-optional due to repeated array-copy-assignments while reducing the array (I won't go into this more here...). Anyway, perhaps you can make use of my example and tweak it back to something more functional-paradigmy.


We begin by a custom type protocol, MyTypes, that will act as an interface for which types we want to include in our generic. We also add the slightly updated EuiclidianPoint protocol, where we use protocol MyTypes as a type restraint to the generic T used in the distance (...) function blue-print.

/* Used as type constraint for Generator.Element */
protocol MyTypes {
    func -(lhs: Self, rhs: Self) -> Self
    func +=(inout lhs: Self, rhs: Self)
}

extension Int : MyTypes { }
extension Double : MyTypes { }
extension Float : MyTypes { }
    /* Extend with the types you wish to be covered by the generic ... */

/* Used as extension to Array : blueprints for extension method
to Array where Generator.Element are constrainted to MyTypes */
protocol EuclideanPoint {
    func distance<T: MyTypes> (other: [T]) -> Double?
    func dimension() -> UInt
}

Note that I've changed the Double return of distance to an optional; you may handle this as you will, but in case the lengths of self and other arrays differ, or types Self and [T] differ, there will be some need of showing non-conformance -- I'll use nil for this here.

We can now implement implement our extension of Array by the EuclidianPoint protocol:

/* Array extension by EuclideanPoint protocol */
extension Array : EuclideanPoint {

    func distance<T: MyTypes> (other: [T]) -> Double? {
        /* [T] is Self? proceed, otherwise return nil */
        if let a = self.first {
            if a is T && self.count == other.count {
                var mySum: Double = 0.0
                for (i, sElement) in self.enumerate() {
                    mySum += pow(((sElement as! T) - other[i]) as! Double, 2)
                }
                return sqrt(mySum)
            }
        }
        return nil
    }

    func dimension() -> UInt {
        return UInt(self.count)
    }
}

Note that in the inner if clause of the distance function we use an explicit down cast to T, but since we've asserted that elements of Self are of type T, this is ok.

Anyway, with this, we're done, and we can test our "generic" array extensions, which we note now also conforms to your protocol EuclidianPoint.

/* Tests and Examples */
let arr1d : [Double] = [3.0, 4.0, 0.0]
let arr2d : [Double] = [-3.0, -4.0, 0.0]
let arr3d : [Double] = [-3.0, -4.0]

let arr1f : [Float] = [-3.0, -4.0, 0.0]

let arr1i = [1, 2, 3]

let _a = arr1d.dimension() // 3, OK
let _b = arr1d.distance(arr2d) // 10, OK (A->B dist)
let _c = arr1d.distance(arr1f) // nil (Incomp. types)
let _d = arr1d.distance(arr3d) // nil (Incomp. sizes)
let _e = arr1i.distance(arr1d) // nil (Incomp. types)

    /* for use in function calls: generic array parameters constrained to
       those that conform to protocol 'EuclidianPoint', as requested     */
func bar<T: MyTypes, U: protocol<EuclideanPoint, _ArrayType> where U.Generator.Element == T> (arr1: U, _ arr2: U) -> Double? {

    // ...

    return arr1.distance(Array(arr2))
        /* We'll need to explicitly tell the distance function
           here that we're sending an array, by initializing an 
           array using the Array(..) initializer                */
}
let myDist = bar(arr1d, arr2d) // 10, OK

Ok!


A note still remaining from my first answer:

Extension of generic type Array to protocol was actually just recently asked here:

The consensus is the you cannot do a generic extension of array to a protocol in the "neat swifty" way that you possible expect. There are however workarounds to mimic such a behaviour, one being the one I've used above. If you are interested in another method, I suggest you look into this thread.

  • You can't it will throw an errorr = type 'Element' constrained to non-protocol type 'Double' – Leo Dabus Dec 26 '15 at 22:13
  • You can use extension Array where Element: FloatingPointType or a custom protocol – Leo Dabus Dec 26 '15 at 22:14
  • @LeoDabus Note that FloatingPointType, for some reason, does not include the basic binary operators, so you'll need to add blueprints to these in an additional protocol (or likewise) – dfri Dec 26 '15 at 22:16
  • you can also add a doubleValue property – Leo Dabus Dec 26 '15 at 22:16
  • @LeoDabus Ah, I didn't know that, thanks! Regarding your first answer: yes, I was to quick on this one, wrote on my iPad, now on Laptop :) will fix – dfri Dec 26 '15 at 22:17
1

You can extend SequenceType instead of Array

extension SequenceType where Generator.Element == Float {
//
}
  • SequenceType has no count property. A similar property is needed by EuclideanPoint protocol – fferri Dec 26 '15 at 22:18
  • 1
    @fferri @Adam : (self as! [Float]).count 💥 self now has count – eonist Mar 26 '17 at 19:42
1

Foreword: As @difri correctly mentions in the comment we can not yet create an extension conforming to a protocol when using generic constrains at the same time. There are already a couple of radars open - searching for "extension of type with constraints cannot have an inheritance clause" will yield a couple of them.

Actual Answer: Building on @LeoDabus awesome answer and my experimenting I came up with the following:

protocol DoubleConvertibleType {
    var doubleValue: Double { get }
}

extension Double : DoubleConvertibleType { var doubleValue: Double { return self         } }
extension Float  : DoubleConvertibleType { var doubleValue: Double { return Double(self) } }
extension CGFloat: DoubleConvertibleType { var doubleValue: Double { return Double(self) } }

extension Array where Element : DoubleConvertibleType {
    func distance(other: Array) -> Double {
        return Double(zip(self, other).map{ pow($0.0.doubleValue - $0.1.doubleValue, 2) }.reduce(0, combine: +))
    }

    func dimension() -> UInt {
        return UInt(self.count)
    }
}

Testing it with

let arr1 = [1.5, 2, 3]
let arr2 = [5.5, 2, 3]
let arrD = arr1.distance(arr2)

Somewhat correctly prints

16

To get the correct answer (at least what I would suspect) you have to wrap the distance into sqrt:

return sqrt(Double(zip(self, other).map{ pow($0.0.doubleValue - $0.1.doubleValue,2) }.reduce(0, combine: +)))

Which then correctly prints

4

  • 3
    This solves the problem described in the details of the question (and does so neatly!), but I think it's worth mentioning that it does not solve the problem asked in the question title: we cannot (in neat swifty way) extend a generic type to a protocol. Note that the solution above removes protocol EuclideanPoint of the equation. Good answer, plus1, but just so people don't click in here and think this solves the much trickier problem "generic Array<T> conformance to protocol"! – dfri Dec 26 '15 at 22:39
  • @mescalinum I was fiddling around with it for quite some time now trying to avoid creating a special protocol for that purpose but seems that is unavoidable. – luk2302 Dec 26 '15 at 22:39
  • 1
    @dfri you are absolutely right, completely forget about the actual protocol we were trying to conform to :D hmmm – luk2302 Dec 26 '15 at 22:40
  • I think this probably does it for the question poster (as he came up with the same answer), and should be accepted. But if possible, please add into your answer that it does just this: solves the specific problem but not the generic array to protocol trickster! Then, if anyone wanna go all out and really attack the latter, they should probably refer to the following thread: stackoverflow.com/questions/34467606/… – dfri Dec 26 '15 at 22:44
  • @dfri just did that because it is an absolutely valid point - thanks. – luk2302 Dec 26 '15 at 22:47

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