4

I am trying to avoid having the ugly "click" sound when stopping an oscillator, so I decided to try some fade-outs with exponentialRampToValueAtTime. Like this:

var playButton = document.getElementById('play');
var stopButton = document.getElementById('stop');

var context = new AudioContext();
var gainNode = context.createGain();
var oscillator =  context.createOscillator();

gainNode.connect(context.destination);
oscillator.connect(gainNode);
gainNode.gain.setValueAtTime(1, context.currentTime);
oscillator.start();
gainNode.gain.exponentialRampToValueAtTime(0.0001, context.currentTime + 1);

This works well, there's no "click" sound and the ramp down is smooth. However, as soon as I do this using buttons and event listeners, the ugly click comes back and somehow the ramp down is more brute

btw, please wait 1 second after pressing "stop" and before re-pressing "play" or ugly things happen :)

var playButton = document.getElementById('play');
var stopButton = document.getElementById('stop');

var context = new AudioContext();
var gainNode = context.createGain();
var oscillator;

gainNode.connect(context.destination);


playButton.addEventListener('click', function() {
  oscillator = context.createOscillator();
  oscillator.connect(gainNode);
  gainNode.gain.setValueAtTime(1, context.currentTime);
  oscillator.start();
}, false);

stopButton.addEventListener('click', function() {
  gainNode.gain.exponentialRampToValueAtTime(0.0001, context.currentTime + 1);
  setTimeout(function(){
  	oscillator.stop();
  }, 1000)
}, false);
<button id="play">play</button>
<button id="stop">stop</button>

I'm clearly missing some theory here. The code is very similar except for the listeners and the outcome of both snippets is very different in quality. Can you please explain where that difference comes from?

Is there a way to achieve the first snippet quality while using buttons/listeners?

Thanks!

6

The problem is that the ramp is done from the previously scheduled value, which in this case is when you pressed the play button. If you set the value once more before scheduling the ramp you'll get a smooth transition again!

var playButton = document.getElementById('play');
var stopButton = document.getElementById('stop');

var context = new AudioContext();
var gainNode = context.createGain();
var oscillator;

gainNode.connect(context.destination);


playButton.addEventListener('click', function() {
  oscillator = context.createOscillator();
  oscillator.connect(gainNode);
  gainNode.gain.setValueAtTime(1, context.currentTime);
  oscillator.start();
}, false);

stopButton.addEventListener('click', function() {
  gainNode.gain.setValueAtTime(gainNode.gain.value, context.currentTime);
  gainNode.gain.exponentialRampToValueAtTime(0.0001, context.currentTime + 1);
  setTimeout(function(){
  	oscillator.stop();
  }, 1000)
}, false);
<button id="play">play</button>
<button id="stop">stop</button>

  • Wow thanks, this works just as I wanted. I still don't fully understand why though... "the ramp is done from the previously scheduled value", why isn't the scheduling done in the "play" button taken into consideration? Why must it be re-set for a second time in the stop button as well? – alemangui Dec 27 '15 at 15:29
  • 1
    Yeah, I can see why it's confusing. :) So what happens is that it sees that the last event that occurred was the setValueAtTime in the play listener. That event occurred at the currentTime of the context at that moment. exponentialRampToValueAtTime is designed so that it takes the time of the last event that happened on the timeline and then makes a curve from there to the time provided as an argument. The API spec actually has a pretty good visualisation of this; w3.org/TR/webaudio/#example1-AudioParam – Oskar Eriksson Dec 27 '15 at 18:14
  • Thanks so much, this is super clear! – alemangui Dec 27 '15 at 18:20

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