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If I put a tracked file (which can be either modified, staged or committed) to .gitignore, what will happen if I then run other git commands (except git rm or git mv the file that I just put inside .gitignore), for example,

  • git add -u ., git add -A ., git add .

  • git commit

  • git push or git pull

  • ...

I would like to know if putting a tracked (modified, staged or committed) into .gitignore will have similar consequence as git rm?

See my comment on a reply to my previous question. https://stackoverflow.com/a/29303952/156458

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  • In order to commit a file, it should be in the staging area. It cannot be there if it's put in .gitignore.
    – Maroun
    Commented Dec 27, 2015 at 14:39
  • "The purpose of gitignore files is to ensure that certain files not tracked by Git remain untracked."
    – chexum
    Commented Dec 27, 2015 at 14:41
  • My post means: After I modified a tracked file in working directory, or staged a file into the staging area, or committed it to the git repository, I then put the file into .gitignore . What happens if I run other git commands? @MarounMaroun
    – Tim
    Commented Dec 27, 2015 at 14:44
  • @chexum. see my comment. do you mean .gitgnore can only accept untracked files, not tracked ones?
    – Tim
    Commented Dec 27, 2015 at 14:44
  • @Tim I now understood your question. Added an answer.
    – Maroun
    Commented Dec 27, 2015 at 14:51

2 Answers 2

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You cannot ignore a file from the staging area by simply adding it to .gitignore.

Adding a file to .gitignore "ensure that certain files not tracked by Git remain untracked". You should first git rm --cached the files you want to ignore:

git rm --cached file

Then they'll be "considered" in the .gitignore. See the Ignoring files:

If you already have a file checked in, and you want to ignore it, Git will not ignore the file if you add a rule later. In those cases, you must untrack the file first, by running the following command in your terminal:

4
  • Thanks. (1) do you mean .gitgnore can only accept untracked files, not tracked ones? (2) See my comment on a reply to my previous question. stackoverflow.com/a/29303952/156458
    – Tim
    Commented Dec 27, 2015 at 14:53
  • @Tim How do you define "can"? You can add whatever you want to the .gitignore file.
    – Maroun
    Commented Dec 27, 2015 at 14:53
  • (1) Do you mean that, for a staged file just put inside .gitignore, it will stay in the staging area and not go into the git repository in the next git commit? (2) What happen to other tracked files (modified, or committed) just put inside .gitignore? (3) if I want to add a tracked (either modified, staged or committed) file into .gitignore, should I stop tracking it first by git rm --cached file?
    – Tim
    Commented Dec 27, 2015 at 15:00
  • @Maroun, what's the following command? or do you mean the above command? Commented Feb 20, 2020 at 23:49
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When you put committed files in .gitignore they will visible as modified whenever there is any change in those files. We don't want this because whatever we put files inside .gitignore those files should not go to GitHub or any other version control system. To resolve this, you need to remove those files from the git cache and then when you see git status those files will not appear as modified.

To remove the file from git cache use-

git rm --cached file

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