#include <stdio.h>
void main()
{
    int x = 1, y = 0, z = 5;
    int a = x && y || z++;
    printf("%d", z);
}

This yields output as 6 whereas

#include <stdio.h>
void main()
{
    int x = 1, y = 0, z = 5;
    int a = x && y && z++;
    printf("%d", z);
}

this would yield answer as 5. WHY ?? Someone please explain.

This is due to the Short Circuit mechanism.

What this means is that when the result of a logical operator is already determined, the rest of the expression isn't evaluated at all, including potential side effects.

The first code fragment behaves like:

int a = (1 && 0) /* result pending... */ || z++;

And the second:

int a = (1 && 0) /* result determined */;

This happens because the value of a logical AND is known to be false if the left side expression is false.

As you can probably tell, the difference between two fragments of code is that the first one evaluates z++, while the other one doesn't.

The reason the second code does not evaluate z++ is that the expression ahead of it evaluates to false, so && chain "short-circuits" the evaluation of the last term.

Operator ||, on the other hand, would short-circuit only when the left side is true.

For starters function main without parameters shall be declared like

int main( void )

In the first program the initialization expression can be represented like

int a = ( x && y ) || ( z++ );

According to the C Standard (6.5.14 Logical OR operator)

  1. ...If the first operand compares unequal to 0, the second operand is not evaluated.

The first oerand ( x && y ) of the expression is equal to 0 because y is initialized by 0

int x = 1, y = 0, z = 5;

So the second operand ( z++ ) is evaluated.

As result z will be equal to 6.

In the second program the initialization expression can be represented the same way as in the first program

int a = ( x && y ) && ( z++ );

According to the C Standard (6.5.13 Logical AND operator)

  1. ...If the first operand compares equal to 0, the second operand is not evaluated.

As before the first operand ( x && y ) of the expression is equal tp 0 and according to the quote the second operand ( z++ ) is not evaluated.

As result z will be equal to 5 as before.

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