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I am trying to get the results from any DOS-based application, effectively letting C# operate it as if it were a user.

I can get it to execute a command, and then show the output. The problem is knowing when the output has ended! For example, if I go start/run "cmd.exe", type "D:", then "cd D:\", and then "tree", it outputs my folder structure on the D drive, and then allows me to type my next command (only after it's finished printing the list).

However I can't find a way in code to get it to realise it's finished, and should allow the next command (basically when cmd.exe starts blinking your cursor).

        public Process p = null;

    private void Form1_Load(object sender, System.EventArgs e)
    {
        ProcessStartInfo procStarter = new ProcessStartInfo("cmd.exe");
        procStarter.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
        procStarter.RedirectStandardInput = true;
        procStarter.UseShellExecute = false;
        procStarter.CreateNoWindow = true;
        p = Process.Start(procStarter);
    }

    private void Form1_Closing(object sender, System.ComponentModel.CancelEventArgs e)
    {
        p.Close();
    }

    private void btnSend_Click(object sender, System.EventArgs e)
    {
        p.StandardInput.WriteLine("D:");
        p.StandardInput.WriteLine(@"cd D:\");
        txtOutput.Text = SendCommand(txtInput.Text);
    }

    private string SendCommand(string cmd)
    {
        p.StandardInput.WriteLine(cmd);
        return p.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd();
    }

In SendCommand(string cmd), if I run p.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd(), as per the code above, it hangs forever, presumably waiting for the application to close?

If I loop through p.StandardOutput.ReadLine(), it shows all the text (including the "D:\>" just before where the blinking cursor would then be, however it doesn't realise it's the end, calls ReadLine again, and hangs in a smiliar fashion to ReadToEnd. A dirty workaround would be to treat it as the end of the response if the current line ends with ">", however that falls apart if a line ends like that anywhere in the response.

I've tried looping through the stream character by character, and there's no special character sent at the end.

Any ideas?

Note: My ultimate goal is to provide a light library I can use for executing any DOS executable (which may require several typed commands passed to it, not just the one off arguments passed via command line on opening), parsing the results returned with a regex template, and returning the extracted result. I figured if I can effectively re-implement the cmd.exe in a windows application, then such a library will be possible.

Thanks, Lee

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5 Answers 5

2

I suspect that your approach doesn’t work. cmd.exe is not going to communicate to you via StandardOutput when or whether the command you ran has finished or not. (I should point out though that this doesn’t stop you from running multiple commands. You can probably just send the command lines and don’t actually need to wait for it to finish.)

Perhaps a more suitable approach might be not to use cmd.exe at all. Instead, use Process.Start() to run each individual command. Then you can use StandardOutput.ReadToEnd() and it will finish when the process is finished, and you can run the next one.

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  • What about for operating something like telnet, or oracle's SQLplus application? - I don't think you could do that running indvidiaul commands seperately? In short when several steps are involved, such as logging in, setting current directories etc, I think running seperate commands would not work? While you can obviously use the available .net API's for doing so, it would be nice to have the flexibility to be able to use any DOS application.
    – Lee
    Aug 10, 2010 at 13:10
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I agree with Timwi, But see if something like below helps

        ProcessStartInfo procStarter = new ProcessStartInfo("cmd.exe");
        procStarter.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
        procStarter.RedirectStandardInput = true;
        procStarter.UseShellExecute = false;
        procStarter.CreateNoWindow = true;
        procStarter.WorkingDirectory = @"D:\";
        procStarter.Arguments = "/C dir";
        Process p = Process.Start(procStarter);
        string output = p.StandardOutput.ReadToEnd();

/C command line to cmd.exe will terminate cmd.exe once the work is done. You can also use p.Exited (exited event) to know when it happens.

However it will not keep the cmd.exe always running. But do you really need to keep it running?

3
  • I've noticed your use of "WorkingDirectory". I could potentially trap "C:\" and "cd dir" type commands, and keep track of the working directory myself, executing each command as a seperate process. Only scenario in which this wouldn't work would be for applications such as telnet or sqlplus, where there's a log-in process of some description.
    – Lee
    Aug 10, 2010 at 14:16
  • (•giggles•) You agree with whom? ☺
    – Timwi
    Aug 10, 2010 at 14:22
  • @Lee yes you are right, for things like telnet of sqlplus you need to use StandardInput, and to take output you need to use StandardOutput. But to know when the application has exited you can use "Exited" event. @Timwi by mistake I agreed to Lee first then I edited it :)
    – Vishalgiri
    Aug 11, 2010 at 15:56
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If you're looking for 'how to wait till the spawned process terminates', Process.WaitForExit is what should do the trick. You could spawn a new shell for each "command".

3
  • I am looking to get the results before the application terminates (which is possible, I just need to know when it's finished giving me the results). For example (this is what gave me the idea), you want to get source safe to export every version, of every file. You can either use their unmanaged API's, or do it via command line. However you would need to open a project, loop all the files, loop all the versions, and then perform a GET on each of the files. This would involve executing multiple commands within the same process, parsing the output after each one.
    – Lee
    Aug 10, 2010 at 12:59
  • @Lee - Why not redirect the output to a file that you can read all at once, once the command completes. Another idea would be to generate a batch file containing all the commands that you want to invoke and then spawn one cmd.exe with the batch file name as the argument. [ As MSDN says, ReadToEnd() blocks indefinitely for interactive servers , which is what you're seeing. ]
    – Gishu
    Aug 10, 2010 at 13:13
  • I would suspect I'd run into the same problem of not knowing when the command's actually completed piping the output to file (I haven't actually tested this though, just working off the hunch). Writing a batch file wouldn't quite work, as the contents of the batch file would effectively be based off previous commands in the same batch. Thanks for your suggestions.
    – Lee
    Aug 10, 2010 at 14:04
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About a year ago I wrote a telnet server for windows that allowed the remote user to issue commands against cmd.exe. Maybe you can use it as a starting point for your own project.

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By reading the output asynchronous I have gotten this to work (aleast almost) like you described:

    public Process p = null;

    private void Send_Click(object sender, System.EventArgs e)
    {

        p.StandardInput.WriteLine("D:");
        p.StandardInput.WriteLine(@"cd D:\");
        p.StandardInput.WriteLine(txtInput.Text);
    }

    private void Form1_Load_1(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        ProcessStartInfo procStarter = new ProcessStartInfo("cmd.exe");
        procStarter.RedirectStandardOutput = true;
        procStarter.RedirectStandardInput = true;
        procStarter.UseShellExecute = false;
        procStarter.CreateNoWindow = true;

        p = Process.Start(procStarter);

        p.OutputDataReceived += new DataReceivedEventHandler(p_OutputDataReceived);
        p.BeginOutputReadLine();

    }

    void p_OutputDataReceived(object sender, DataReceivedEventArgs e)
    {
        addTextToOutput(e.Data);
    }

    private void addTextToOutput(string text)
    {
        if (txtOutput.InvokeRequired)
        {
            addTextCallback cb = new addTextCallback(addTextToOutput);
            this.Invoke(cb, new Object[] { text });
        }
        else
        {
            txtOutput.Text += text+ System.Environment.NewLine;
        }
    }

    delegate void addTextCallback(String text);

    private void Form1_FormClosing(object sender, FormClosingEventArgs e)
    {
        p.Close();
    }
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  • This looks like a similar technique to what Matthew Whited's used. While it provides the most cmd.exe-like functionality, it doesn't allow you to link a response to a command, the two happen independently. But it seems what i'm looking for sadly can't be done. Thanks everyone for the assistance, this is my first time on stackoverflow and have been very pleased with the speed and quality of response.
    – Lee
    Aug 10, 2010 at 15:36
  • Could you explain how it is you want the commands to be linked to the output? I'm not sure it get exactly what you are trying to achieve.
    – Falle1234
    Aug 10, 2010 at 18:24

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