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I am making a TicTacToe program and I'm trying to use OOP techniques. Within my 'Board' class I am wanting the program to store each way a set of moves can be won.

I hope this can be demonstrated here:

Board.h

#pragma once

class Board
{
private: 
    int winningRows[8][3]; //Variable in question

public:
    static const char X = 'X'; //Game piece 'X'
    static const char O = 'O'; //Game piece 'O'
    static const char EMPTY = ' '; //Empty game piece
    static const char TIE = 'T'; //Game is tie
    static const char NOONE = 'N'; //Nobody has won game yet
    static const int numbOfSquares = 9; //Number of squares on the board

    int InitializeWinningCombinations();
    void FindWinner();
};

Board.cpp

 #include "stdafx.h"
 #include "Board.h"

int Board::InitializeWinningCombinations()
{
    /*
    The playing board
    0, 1, 2
    3, 4, 5
    6, 7, 8
    */
    //All possible ways player can win game
    winningRows[8][3] = {
        //Horizontal 
        {0, 1, 2},
        {3, 4, 5},
        {6, 7, 8},
        //Vertical
        {0, 3, 6},
        {1, 4, 7},
        {2, 5, 8},
        //Diagonal
        {2, 4, 6},
        {0, 4, 8}
    };

    //return winnigRows[8][3];
}


void Board::FindWinner()
{
    //I am wanting to get the variable here so I can play around with it later. 
    int winningRows = InitializeWinningCombinations();
}

I could just have the 'winningRows' variable inside the 'FindWinnner' function but from my understanding it is best to abstract as much as possible and have it as a member of the 'Board' class

Thank you for your time.

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winningRows[8][3] = {
        //Horizontal 
        {0, 1, 2},
        {3, 4, 5},
        {6, 7, 8},
        //Vertical
        {0, 3, 6},
        {1, 4, 7},
        {2, 5, 8},
        //Diagonal
        {2, 4, 6},
        {0, 4, 8}
    };

Is an attempted array assignment not an initialization and it cannot be done. You can initialize the array in a constructor like

Board() : winningRows{
        //Horizontal 
        {0, 1, 2},
        {3, 4, 5},
        {6, 7, 8},
        //Vertical
        {0, 3, 6},
        {1, 4, 7},
        {2, 5, 8},
        //Diagonal
        {2, 4, 6},
        {0, 4, 8}
    } {}

Live Example

  • Thank you, I will need to read up on constructors. – Ryan Swann Dec 28 '15 at 18:35
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You'd have to change the signature to

int** InitializeWinningCombinations();

Then you could call it as

int** winningRows = InitializeWinningCombinations();
  • Sorry for this question, that's using pointers? I am currently going through a textbook and trying to work ahead than what is presented but I am causing myself some issues. – Ryan Swann Dec 28 '15 at 17:58
  • You may also wish to comment on the only uncommented line in InitializeWinningCombinations as it is rather broken at the moment. – R_Kapp Dec 28 '15 at 17:59
  • Yes the way C++ uses pointers to represent the array is that the pointer is to the first element of the array, then the type of the array (int in this case) is used to know how "big" of steps to take to get to each element. This post gives a good description of this. – CoryKramer Dec 28 '15 at 18:00

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