I've just started exploring perl6 grammars. How can I make up a token "line" that matches everything between the beginning of a line and its end? I've tried the following without success:

my $txt = q:to/EOS/;
    row 1
    row 2
    row 3
    EOS


grammar sample {
    token TOP {
        <line>
    }

    token line {
        ^^.*$$
    }
}

my $match = sample.parse($txt);

say $match<line>[0];
up vote 10 down vote accepted

I can see 2 problem in your Grammar here, the first one here is the token line, ^^ and $$ are anchor to start and end of line, howeve you can have new line in between. To illustrate, let's just use a simple regex, without Grammar first:

my $txt = q:to/EOS/;
    row 1
    row 2
    row 3
    EOS

if $txt ~~ m/^^.*$$/ {
    say "match";
    say $/;
}

Running that, the output is:

match
「row 1
row 2
row 3」

You see that the regex match more that what is desired, however the first problem is not there, it is because of ratcheting, matching with a token will not work:

my $txt = q:to/EOS/;
    row 1
    row 2
    row 3
    EOS

my regex r {^^.*$$};
if $txt ~~ &r {
    say "match regex";
    say $/;
} else {
    say "does not match regex";
}
my token t {^^.*$$};
if $txt ~~ &t {
    say "match token";
    say $/;
} else {
    say "does not match token";
}

Running that, the output is:

match regex
「row 1
row 2
row 3」
does not match token

I am not really sure why, but token and anchor $$ does not seems to work well together. But what you want instead is searching for everything except a newline, which is \N* The following grammar solve mostly your issue:

grammar sample {
    token TOP {<line>}
    token line {\N+}
}

However it only matches the first occurence, as you search for only one line, what you might want to do is searching for a line + an optional vertical whitespace (In your case, you have a new line at the end of your string, but i guess you would like to take the last line even if there is no new line at the end ), repeated several times:

my $txt = q:to/EOS/;
    row 1
    row 2
    row 3
    EOS

grammar sample {
    token TOP {[<line>\v?]*}
    token line {\N+}
}

my $match = sample.parse($txt);
for $match<line> -> $l {
    say $l;
}

Output of that script begin:

「row 1」
「row 2」
「row 3」

Also to help you using and debugging Grammar, 2 really usefull modules : Grammar::Tracer and Grammar::Debugger . Just include them at the beginning of the script. Tracer show a colorful tree of the matching done by your Grammar. Debugger allows you to see it matching step by step in real time.

  • 3
    Reading Christoph comment, i realized why token and $$ are not working well. Token don't do back tracking (because of ratcheting), hence in ^^.*$$ the .* is capturing the last end of line and $$ is not matching anymore. In chritoph comment, the .*? make the .* non greedy, and so the $$ can match – Pierre VIGIER Dec 29 '15 at 10:39
  • 1
    Something interesting is also the % operator, after a quantifier, check the following version: my $txt = "row 1\nrow 2\nrow 3"; grammar sample { token TOP {<line>* % \v} token line {\N+} } my $match = sample.subparse($txt); for $match<line> -> $l { say $l; } – Pierre VIGIER Jan 17 '16 at 14:33

Your original aproach can be made to work via

grammar sample {
    token TOP { <line>+ %% \n }
    token line { ^^ .*? $$ }
}

Personally, I would not try to anchor line and use \N instead as already suggested.

my $txt = q:to/EOS/;
row 1
row 2
row 3
EOS


grammar sample {
    token TOP {
        <line>+
    }
    token line {
        \N+ \n
    }
}

my $match = sample.parse($txt);

say $match<line>[0];

Or if you can be specific about the line:

grammar sample {
    token TOP {
        <line>+
    }
    rule line {
        \w+ \d
    }
}
my $txt = q:to/EOS/;
    row 1
    row 2
    row 3
    EOS

grammar sample {
    token TOP { <line> }
    token line { .* }
}

for $txt.lines -> $line {
    ## An single line of text....
    say $line;
    ## Parse line of text to find match obj...
    my $match = sample.parse($line);
    say $match<line>;
}
  • 2
    I feel this doesn't answer the original question, as the token "line" simply matchen anything you throw at it. In this case, it just happens to match "a complete line", because that's all you give to it at a time. – timotimo Dec 29 '15 at 9:53

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