31

Sorry I don't know how to phrase the question title. Please help edit if possible.

I have an object like this:

{
    a: 'jack',
    b: {
        c: 'sparrow',
        d: {
           e: 'hahaha'
        }
    }
}

I want to make it look like:

{
    'a': 'jack',
    'b.c': 'sparrow',
    'b.d.e': 'hahaha'
}

// so that I can use it this way:
a['b.d.e']

jQuery is ok too. I know for the nested object, I can use a.b.d.e to get hahaha, but today I have to use it like a['b.d.e'] -_-!!! How can I achieve this? Thanks in advance :)

1

16 Answers 16

42

You could use a recursive function to crawl the object and flatten it for you.

var test = {
    a: 'jack',
    b: {
        c: 'sparrow',
        d: {
            e: 'hahaha'
        }
    }
};

function traverseAndFlatten(currentNode, target, flattenedKey) {
    for (var key in currentNode) {
        if (currentNode.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
            var newKey;
            if (flattenedKey === undefined) {
                newKey = key;
            } else {
                newKey = flattenedKey + '.' + key;
            }

            var value = currentNode[key];
            if (typeof value === "object") {
                traverseAndFlatten(value, target, newKey);
            } else {
                target[newKey] = value;
            }
        }
    }
}

function flatten(obj) {
    var flattenedObject = {};
    traverseAndFlatten(obj, flattenedObject);
    return flattenedObject;
}

var flattened = JSON.stringify(flatten(test));
console.log(flattened);

One way to reverse this, if needed, is a nested set of loops. There is probably a cleaner way to accomplish this though:

var test = {'a':'jack','b.c':'sparrow','b.d.e':'hahaha'};

function expand(target, keySeparator) {
    var result = {};
    for (var key in target) {
        if (target.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
          var nestedKeys = key.split(keySeparator);
          // Get the last subKey
          var leaf = nestedKeys[nestedKeys.length - 1];
          // Get all subKeys except for the last
          var branch = nestedKeys.slice(0, nestedKeys.length - 1);
          
          var currentTarget = result;
          for (var i = 0; i < branch.length; i += 1) {
            var subKey = nestedKeys[i];
            // If this is the first time visiting this branch, we need to instantiate it
            if (currentTarget[subKey] === undefined) {
              currentTarget[subKey] = {};
            }
            // Visit the branch
            currentTarget = currentTarget[subKey];
          }
          currentTarget[leaf] = target[key];
        }
    }
    return result;
}

var expanded = JSON.stringify(expand(test, "."));
console.log(expanded);

2
  • Do anyone have its reverse Sep 7, 2022 at 6:31
  • @HemantRajpoot I edited this answer to include a simple reversal. There may be a much cleaner way to accomplish this though.
    – Marie
    Sep 12, 2022 at 12:44
17

An alternative recursive implementation. I just felt like writing one implementation myself, even though the current ones are already really good.

The recursive function checks whether the key is of type 'object'.

  • If it's an object, we iterate by each object's key.
  • Else, we add it into our result object.
function flat(res, key, val, pre = '') {
  const prefix = [pre, key].filter(v => v).join('.');
  return typeof val === 'object'
    ? Object.keys(val).reduce((prev, curr) => flat(prev, curr, val[curr], prefix), res)
    : Object.assign(res, { [prefix]: val});
}
return Object.keys(input).reduce((prev, curr) => flat(prev, curr, input[curr]), {});

Flat NPM package

Or you can simply use flat npm package, which is a well known tested library.

var flatten = require('flat')
flatten(obj);

⬑ I would use this in serious code.

[Extra] Neater call to the function above

function flatObject(input) {
  function flat(res, key, val, pre = '') {
    const prefix = [pre, key].filter(v => v).join('.');
    return typeof val === 'object'
      ? Object.keys(val).reduce((prev, curr) => flat(prev, curr, val[curr], prefix), res)
      : Object.assign(res, { [prefix]: val});
  }

  return Object.keys(input).reduce((prev, curr) => flat(prev, curr, input[curr]), {});
}

const result = flatObject(input);

[Extra] Demo

http://codepen.io/zurfyx/pen/VpErja?editors=1010

function flatObject(input) {
  function flat(res, key, val, pre = '') {
    const prefix = [pre, key].filter(v => v).join('.');
    return typeof val === 'object'
      ? Object.keys(val).reduce((prev, curr) => flat(prev, curr, val[curr], prefix), res)
      : Object.assign(res, { [prefix]: val});
  }

  return Object.keys(input).reduce((prev, curr) => flat(prev, curr, input[curr]), {});
}

const result = flatObject({
    a: 'jack',
    b: {
        c: 'sparrow',
        d: {
           e: 'hahaha'
        }
    }
});

document.getElementById('code').innerHTML = JSON.stringify(result, null, 2);
<pre><code id="code"></code></pre>

3
  • Slight tweak to define using functional notation and add check if the input was a JSON string instead of an object. const flatten = (input) => { function flat(res, key, val, pre = '') { const prefix = [pre, key].filter(v => v).join('_'); return typeof val === 'object' ? Object.keys(val).reduce((prev, curr) => flat(prev, curr, val[curr], prefix), res) : Object.assign(res, { [prefix]: val}); } if (typeof input === 'string') { input = JSON.parse(input); } return Object.keys(input).reduce((prev, curr) => flat(prev, curr, input[curr]), {}); }
    – Shanerk
    Sep 5, 2022 at 19:44
  • for future readers, I would not recommend using this function. it does not handle input of: strings, numbers, booleans, undefined, null, Dates; it does not handle leaves of: Dates, other class objects. Oct 13, 2022 at 20:50
  • this handles those cases and includes tests: github.com/prmichaelsen/parm/blob/… and github.com/prmichaelsen/parm/blob/… Oct 13, 2022 at 23:13
15

You could loop through the entries of the object. If the value is an object, recursively call the function. Use flatMap to get a flattened array of entries.

Then use Object.fromEntries() to get an object from the flattened array of entries

const input = {
  a: 'jack',
  b: {
    c: 'sparrow',
    d: {
      e: 'hahaha'
    }
  }
}

const getEntries = (o, prefix = '') => 
  Object.entries(o).flatMap(([k, v]) => 
    Object(v) === v  ? getEntries(v, `${prefix}${k}.`) : [ [`${prefix}${k}`, v] ]
  )

console.log(
  Object.fromEntries(getEntries(input))
)

Note: Object(v) === v returns true only for objects. typeof v === 'object' is true for v = null too.

1
  • Just a note that this otherwise great answer considers Date to be objects, while Date should be probably treated like a value in this scenario. Jan 28, 2022 at 0:26
6

Recursive is the best solution for this case.

function flatten(input, reference, output) {
  output = output || {};
  for (var key in input) {
    var value = input[key];
    key = reference ? reference + '.' + key : key;
    if (typeof value === 'object' && value !== null) {
      flatten(value, key, output);
    } else {
      output[key] = value;
    }
  }
  return output;
}
var result = flatten({
  a: 'jack',
  b: {
    c: 'sparrow',
    d: {
      e: 'hahaha'
    }
  }
});
document.body.textContent = JSON.stringify(result);

4

Option 1: export a flat object with just the Leaves. i.e object exported contains just paths with primitive value at the end ( see example ) .

//recursion: walk on each route until the primitive value.
//Did we found a primitive?
//Good, then join all keys in the current path and save it on the export object.
export function flatObject(obj) {
    const flatObject = {};
    const path = []; // current path

    function dig(obj) {
        if (obj !== Object(obj))
            /*is primitive, end of path*/
            return flatObject[path.join('.')] = obj; /*<- value*/ 
    
        //no? so this is an object with keys. go deeper on each key down
        for (let key in obj) {
            path.push(key);
            dig(obj[key]);
            path.pop();
        }
    }

    dig(obj);
    return flatObject;
}

Example

let  obj = {aaa:{bbb:{c:1,d:7}}, bb:{vv:2}}
console.log(flatObject(obj))
/*
{
  "aaa.bbb.c": 1,
  "aaa.bbb.d": 7,
  "bb.vv": 2
}
*/

Option 2: export a flat object with all intermidate paths. a little bit shorter and simpler (see example).

export function flatObject(obj) {
    const flatObject = {};
    const path = []; // current path

    function dig(obj) {
        for (let key in obj) {
            path.push(key);
            flatObject[path.join('.')] = obj[key];
            dig(obj[key])
            path.pop();
        }
    }

    dig(obj);
    return flatObject;
}

Example:

let  obj = {aaa:{bbb:{c:1,d:7}}, bb:{vv:2}}
console.log(flatObject(obj))
/*{
  "aaa": {
    "bbb": {
      "c": 1,
      "d": 7
    }
  },
  "aaa.bbb": {
    "c": 1,
    "d": 7
  },
  "aaa.bbb.c": 1,
  "aaa.bbb.d": 7,
  "bb": {
    "vv": 2
  },
  "bb.vv": 2
}
*/
3

A recursive approach by using a parameter for parent keys.

const
    getValues = (object, parents = []) => Object.assign({}, ...Object
        .entries(object)
        .map(([k, v]) => v && typeof v === 'object'
            ? getValues(v, [...parents, k])
            : { [[...parents, k].join('.')]: v }
        )
    ),
    object = { a: 'jack', b: { c: 'sparrow', d: { e: 'hahaha' } } };

console.log(getValues(object));

2

Another approach using ES6.

const obj = {
  a: "jack",
  b: {
    c: "sparrow",
    d: {
      e: "hahaha"
    }
  }
};

function flattenObj(value, currentKey) {
  let result = {};

  Object.keys(value).forEach(key => {

    const tempKey = currentKey ? `${currentKey}.${key}` : key;

    if (typeof value[key] !== "object") {
      result[tempKey] = value[key];
    } else {
      result = { ...result, ...flattenObj(value[key], tempKey) };
    }
  });

  return result;
}

console.log(flattenObj(obj));
0
1

Just an example how can you achieve that with ES6 features.

const flatObject = obj => {
    const keys = Object.keys(obj)

    return keys.reduce((acc, k) => {
        const value = obj[k]

        return typeof value === 'object' ?
             {...acc, ...ObjectUtils.flatObject(value)} :
             {...acc, [k]: value}
    } , {})
}
2
  • 2
    Where does ObjectUtils come from? Jan 6, 2020 at 21:19
  • 2
    i guess the line should be {...acc, ...flatObject(value)} : - as a recursive call
    – muescha
    Jun 21, 2020 at 14:14
1

Here is a simple solution -

function flatObj(obj, newObj, parentKey) {
    for(let key in obj) {

        const currKey = parentKey.length > 0 ? `${parentKey}.${key}` : key

        if (typeof obj[key] === "object") {
            flatObj(obj[key], newObj, currKey);
        } else {
            newObj[currKey] = obj[key];
        }
    }

    return newObj;
};

    let obj = {
       a: 'jack',
       b: {
          c: 'sparrow',
          d: {
             e: 'hahaha'
          }
       }
    };

console.log(flatObj(obj, {}, ""));
1

Solution to exclude Array and Date

All of the solutions lack in providing a means to not flatten Arrays. As arrays are considered as objects in javascript, Object(Array) === Array will give true. That will cause issues.

For example:

function traverseAndFlatten(currentNode, target, flattenedKey) {
  for (var key in currentNode) {
    if (currentNode.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
      var newKey;
      if (flattenedKey === undefined) {
        newKey = key;
      } else {
        newKey = flattenedKey + '.' + key;
      }

      var value = currentNode[key];
      if (Object(value) === value) {
        if (Object.keys(value).length === 0) {
          target[newKey] = {};
        }
        traverseAndFlatten(value, target, newKey);
      } else {
        target[newKey] = value;
      }
    }
  }

}

function flatten(obj) {
  var flattenedObject = {};
  traverseAndFlatten(obj, flattenedObject);
  return flattenedObject;
}

console.log('flattened object :', flatten({
  a: 'aaa',
  b: {
    cc: ['11', '22', '33'],
    d: {
      e: null,
      f: new Date()
    }
  }
}))

//output flattened object : {
//  "a": "aaa",
//  "b.cc.0": "11",
//  "b.cc.1": "22",
//  "b.cc.2": "33",
//  "b.d.e": null,
//  "b.d.f": {}
//}

We can see that Array and Date are messed up.

To avoid that, instead of using only Object(Array) === Array as condition, use Object(value) === value && !Array.isArray(value) && !(value instanceof Date)

Additionally, typeof value === 'object' && value !== null && !Array.isArray(value) && !(value instanceof Date) can be used which serves the same purpose as the one before.

!(value instanceof Date) is used to exclude date as javascript consideres Date as an object.

sample code solution to flatten and expand :

function traverseAndFlatten(currentNode, target, flattenedKey) {
  for (var key in currentNode) {
    if (currentNode.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
      var newKey;
      if (flattenedKey === undefined) {
        newKey = key;
      } else {
        newKey = flattenedKey + '.' + key;
      }

      var value = currentNode[key];
      if (Object(value) === value && !Array.isArray(value) && !(value instanceof Date)) {
        if (Object.keys(value).length === 0) {
          target[newKey] = {};
        }
        traverseAndFlatten(value, target, newKey);
      } else {
        target[newKey] = value;
      }
    }
  }

}

function flatten(obj) {
  var flattenedObject = {};
  traverseAndFlatten(obj, flattenedObject);
  return flattenedObject;
}

console.log('flattened object :', flatten({
  a: 'aaa',
  b: {
    cc: ['11', '22', '33'],
    d: {
      e: null,
      f: new Date()
    }
  }
}))

//Output
//flattened object: {
//  "a": "aaa",
//  "b.cc": [
//    "11",
//    "22",
//    "33"
//  ],
//  "b.d.e": null,
//  "b.d.f": "2023-09-27T03:38:02.963Z"
//}

//To expand the flattened object

function expand(target, keySeparator) {
  var result = {};
  for (var key in target) {
    if (target.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
      var nestedKeys = key.split(keySeparator);
      var leaf = nestedKeys[nestedKeys.length - 1];
      var branch = nestedKeys.slice(0, nestedKeys.length - 1);
      var currentTarget = result;
      for (var i = 0; i < branch.length; i += 1) {
        var subKey = nestedKeys[i];
        if (currentTarget[subKey] === undefined) {
          currentTarget[subKey] = {};
        }
        currentTarget = currentTarget[subKey];
      }
      currentTarget[leaf] = target[key];
    }
  }
  return result;
}

console.log('expanded object: ', expand({
  "a": "aaa",
  "b.cc": [
    "11",
    "22",
    "33"
  ],
  "b.d.e": null,
  "b.d.f": "2023-09-27T03:20:06.511Z"
}, '.'))

//Output
//expanded object:  {
//  "a": "aaa",
//  "b": {
//    "cc": [
//      "11",
//      "22",
//      "33"
//    ],
//    "d": {
//      "e": null,
//      "f": "2023-09-27T03:20:06.511Z"
//    }
//  }
//}

0

var flattenObject = function(ob) {
  var toReturn = {};

  for (var i in ob) {
    if (!ob.hasOwnProperty(i)) continue;

    if ((typeof ob[i]) == 'object' && ob[i] !== null) {
      var flatObject = flattenObject(ob[i]);
      for (var x in flatObject) {
        if (!flatObject.hasOwnProperty(x)) continue;

        toReturn[i + '.' + x] = flatObject[x];
      }
    } else {
      toReturn[i] = ob[i];
    }
  }
  console.log(toReturn)
  return toReturn;
};

var ob = {
  'a': {
    'b': {
      'b2': 2
    },
    'c': {
      'c2': 2,
      'c3': 3
    }
  }
};
flattenObject(ob);

1
  • Can you please edit your answer so that it explains your solution!? Thanks. Mar 3, 2020 at 18:53
0
const flatten = function(obj) {
  const result = {};

  for (let key in obj) {
    if (typeof obj[key] === 'object') {
      const childObj = flatten(obj[key]);
    
      for (let childObjKey in childObj) {
        result[`${key}.${childObjKey}`] = childObj[childObjKey];
      }
    } else {
      result[key] = obj[key];
    }
  }
  return result
}

var test = {
    a: 'jack',
    b: {
        c: 'sparrow',
        d: {
            e: 'hahaha'
        }
    }
};

console.log(flatten(test));
0

If you are here to convert nested object like this

{
  a:2,
  b: {
    c:3
  }
}

to this

  {
  a:2,
  c:3
}

than try this Object.assign one line to flat the nested object

Object.assign({}, ...function _flatten(o) { return [].concat(...Object.keys(o).map(k => typeof o[k] === 'object' ? _flatten(o[k]) : ({[k]: o[k]})))}(yourObject))

reference to this post

https://stackoverflow.com/a/33037683/8609844

0

function flatObject(object, currentKey) {
  return Object.entries(object).reduce((acc, [key, value]) => {
    const tempKey = currentKey ? `${currentKey}.${key}` : key;

    return value instanceof Object ?
      { ...acc, ...flatObject(value, tempKey) } :
      { ...acc, [tempKey]: value };
  }, {});
}

const test = {
    a: 'jack',
    b: {
        c: 'sparrow',
        d: {
            e: 'hahaha'
        }
    }
};

console.log(flatObject(test))

0

I think this is the simplest solution of all the above, I used a recursive function to track the key and finally return it with a new object.

let obj = {
    a: 'jack',
    b: {
        c: 'sparrow',
        d: {
           e: 'hahaha'
        }
    }
}

const flatObj = (obj) => {
    let obj1 = {}
    function recur(obj, st){
      for(let ob in obj){
        if(typeof obj[ob] === 'object' && obj[ob] !== null){
          recur(obj[ob], st+ob)
        }else{
          obj1[(st+ob).split('').join('.')] = obj[ob]
        }
      }
   }

  recur(obj, "")
  
  return obj1
}

let res = flatObj(obj)

console.log(res)

-4

Try this

const result = [].concat.apply([], parentArray.map((item: any) => item.any)

1
  • 2
    This isn’t JavaScript, this isn’t about plain objects, and it doesn’t even work for Arrays. There’s no context how this code is supposed to work. And in general, “try this” answers are not useful. Please add some explanation. Code-only answers are less useful for future readers and don’t explain the OP’s mistake or how to approach the problem. Oct 15, 2021 at 4:17

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