220

How do I do the following?

select top 1 Fname from MyTbl

In Oracle 11g?

239

If you want just a first selected row, you can:

select fname from MyTbl where rownum = 1

You can also use analytic functions to order and take the top x:

select max(fname) over (rank() order by some_factor) from MyTbl
  • 9
    Not sure what the second example is supposed to achieve... – Patrick Marchand Aug 10 '10 at 18:08
  • 48
    This is good if you only want 1 row and don't care which. If you want specific rows, like the most recent record, you need to do the sort in a subselect, like Vash's answer. Oracle assigns rownums before the sort. – Scott Bailey Aug 10 '10 at 19:50
  • 4
    @Scott yup. that is correct. And Patrick, good point I think the syntax is incorrect on that. It really should be a keep over (dense_rank() last... ) – mcpeterson Aug 11 '10 at 16:10
  • 1
    The difference between the first and second example is that the first one selects A row (any row, with no order). The second example gets the value of the first row, without doing an order inner query (as per examples below). – JulesLt Aug 12 '10 at 12:36
  • 3
    The syntax in not correct in: select max(fname) over (rank() order by some_factor) from MyTbl – Stéphane Gerber Nov 6 '13 at 11:43
152
SELECT *
  FROM (SELECT * FROM MyTbl ORDER BY Fname )
 WHERE ROWNUM = 1;
  • 7
    This answer correctly gets the TOP row (orders the results before restricting on ROWNUM). – JulesLt Aug 12 '10 at 12:42
  • This answer is not an exact translation - the original query doesn't have an ORDER BY, nor does it return all columns in the table. – OMG Ponies Aug 12 '10 at 15:37
  • I stand corrected (see below). Will switch votes once time is up. – JulesLt Aug 12 '10 at 17:24
  • 4
    @OMGPonies yeah. but its probably what most people actually want who come to this page via googling their problem – NimChimpsky Nov 19 '15 at 11:12
  • 3
    This for sure must be the winning answer in this thread. I might add a note that for top X one can change it to WHERE ROWNUM <= X – SomethingSomething Feb 20 '16 at 23:36
25

With Oracle 12c (June 2013), you are able to use it like the following.

SELECT * FROM   MYTABLE
--ORDER BY COLUMNNAME -OPTIONAL          
OFFSET 0 ROWS FETCH NEXT 1 ROWS ONLY
  • 6
    Interesting command, I'm using 12c here and the OFFSET 0 ROWS apparently is not necessary, you can use FETCH NEXT 1 ROWS ONLY or even FETCH FIRST ROW ONLY, the order by is important or it will be equivalent to just using a WHERE rownum = 1. I've even tried it in an OUTER APPLY instruction and it worked like Ms-SQL's TOP function there. – Rafael Merlin Nov 6 '15 at 19:01
  • You are right @RafaelMerlin. After your post I recognized that OFFSET 0 ROWS is not necessary. It would be useful when retrieving data between top X and top Y. – MSK Jan 6 '16 at 10:25
  • 1
    More examples : oracle-base.com/articles/12c/… – FixFaier Jan 5 '18 at 10:30
  • So far so good, with an important missing point which's TIES. Refer this for the cases when ties occur for version 12c + and 12c - – Barbaros Özhan Jul 13 at 21:02
9

You could use ROW_NUMBER() with a ORDER BY clause in sub-query and use this column in replacement of TOP N. This can be explained step-by-step.

See the below table which have two columns NAME and DT_CREATED.

enter image description here

If you need to take only the first two dates irrespective of NAME, you could use the below query. The logic has been written inside query

-- The number of records can be specified in WHERE clause
SELECT RNO,NAME,DT_CREATED
FROM
(
    -- Generates numbers in a column in sequence in the order of date
    SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY DT_CREATED) AS RNO,
    NAME,DT_CREATED
    FROM DEMOTOP
)TAB
WHERE RNO<3;

RESULT

enter image description here

In some situations, we need to select TOP N results respective to each NAME. In such case we can use PARTITION BY with an ORDER BY clause in sub-query. Refer the below query.

-- The number of records can be specified in WHERE clause
SELECT RNO,NAME,DT_CREATED
FROM
(
  --Generates numbers in a column in sequence in the order of date for each NAME
    SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY NAME ORDER BY DT_CREATED) AS RNO,
    NAME,DT_CREATED
    FROM DEMOTOP
)TAB
WHERE RNO<3;

RESULT

enter image description here

  • Using ROW_NUMBER()... is more correct solution than in topic answer. One problem with this solution (and with max(field) variant too) that you cannot do things like "select ... (select ROW_NUMBER() ... ) for update;" – Alexo Po. Dec 9 '15 at 8:33
  • And it's sometimes very important in PL/SQL (sorry, failed to edit previous comment in 5 minutes limit). – Alexo Po. Dec 9 '15 at 8:39
  • In such case we can use CTE as in the outer part. Right? @Alexo Po. – Sarath Avanavu Dec 9 '15 at 15:28
  • I think I do not understand you. for update clause can be used when ROWID is "easily" preserved by Oracle. So grouping (and grouping due to analytic clause usage) hides real ROWID and rows cannot be locked. And second, CTE (with (select ... ) as clause) does not change anything to this problem, CTE just aims in reading and supporting queries. Right? @Sarath Avanavu – Alexo Po. Dec 11 '15 at 8:45
  • Note on myself. The problem with ROWID actually happens specifically because of where RNO<3 condition, in this case value of RNO is not connected with ROWID so that is why Oracle cannot lock rows. – Alexo Po. Dec 11 '15 at 8:54
7

You can do something like

    SELECT *
      FROM (SELECT Fname FROM MyTbl ORDER BY Fname )
 WHERE rownum = 1;

You could also use the analytic functions RANK and/or DENSE_RANK, but ROWNUM is probably the easiest.

  • 1
    can you please help with some example of rank etc. – breakfreehg Sep 15 '14 at 15:04
6
select * from (
    select FName from MyTbl
)
where rownum <= 1;
5

Use:

SELECT x.*
  FROM (SELECT fname 
          FROM MyTbl) x
 WHERE ROWNUM = 1

If using Oracle9i+, you could look at using analytic functions like ROW_NUMBER() but they won't perform as well as ROWNUM.

  • 1
    Nice answer but contains a tiny typo. Where you say Oracle9i+ shouldn't that be 8i? download-west.oracle.com/docs/cd/A87860_01/doc/server.817/… – Ian Carpenter Aug 10 '10 at 18:32
  • @carpenteri: True, analytics were available in 8i - can't remember the details of, but analytics weren't really available to the public until 9i. – OMG Ponies Aug 10 '10 at 18:35
  • Small comment - Vash's answer below includes an ORDER BY on the inner query which is critical if you want the TOP value of fname, rather than 'first' (which can be anything, most likely first row inserted). Might be worth an edit? – JulesLt Aug 12 '10 at 12:39
  • @JulesLt: The query provided by the OP doesn't include an ORDER BY, so this is answer represents and exact translation to Oracle syntax. – OMG Ponies Aug 12 '10 at 15:36
  • My misunderstanding of the SQL SERVER TOP syntax (erroneously presumed that it was similar to FIRST in RANK, not ROWNUM). Voted up. – JulesLt Aug 12 '10 at 17:23
3

To select the first row from a table and to select one row from a table are two different tasks and need a different query. There are many possible ways to do so. Four of them are:

First

select  max(Fname) from MyTbl;

Second

select  min(Fname) from MyTbl;

Third

select  Fname from MyTbl  where rownum = 1;

Fourth

select  max(Fname) from MyTbl where rowid=(select  max(rowid) from MyTbl)
2

I had the same issue, and I can fix this with this solution:

select a.*, rownum 
from (select Fname from MyTbl order by Fname DESC) a
where
rownum = 1

You can order your result before to have the first value on top.

Good luck

protected by cassiomolin Feb 22 at 13:50

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