14

Consider following code:

#include <memory>

void f( std::shared_ptr<int> ) {}

int main()
{
    f( 0 );               // compiles fine in gcc and clang
    f( 1 - 1 );           // compiles fine in gcc, fails in clang
    constexpr int i = 0;
    f( i );               // fails to compile in gcc and clang
    f( i - 0 );           // compiles fine in gcc, fails in clang
}

why only f( i ) fails to compile, though i should be evaluated as compile time constant with value 0?

PS checked with g++ v 5.1.0, it accepts all variants except f(i); in both c++11 and c++14 mode PPS checked with clang 3.7, it rejects all variants except literal 0 in both c++11 and c++14 mode

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  • 2
    Compiler knows 0 is "valid" pointer (NULL) but otherwise not. I don't think any of this is correct code, even though some of it works. – Jeff Dec 29 '15 at 17:04
  • 1
    I'm not sure nullptr is involved in this question at all; it's about conversion from int to void *. – Tommy Dec 29 '15 at 17:18
  • @Tommy changed to std::shared_ptr to be about nullptr for sure – Slava Dec 29 '15 at 17:26
  • Note this could be generalized more see the live example and we can see that clang accepts the more general example in C++03 as does gcc. – Shafik Yaghmour Dec 29 '15 at 19:14
20

This is a gcc bug. Defect report 903: Value-dependent integral null pointer constants which is a defect report against C++11(it has CD3 status), makes it so that only an integer literal 0 is considered a null pointer constant.

It changed section 4.10 [conv.ptr] paragraph 1 amongst other changes from:

A null pointer constant is an integral constant expression (5.19 [expr.const]) prvalue of integer type that evaluates to zero [...]

to:

A null pointer constant is an integer literal (2.14.2 [lex.icon]) with value zero [...]

This is listed as an incompatibility against C++03, from section C.2.2 Clause 4: standard conversions [diff.cpp03.conv] which says:

Change: Only literals are integer null pointer constants
Rationale: Removing surprising interactions with templates and constant expressions
Effect on original feature: Valid C++ 2003 code may fail to compile or produce different results in this International Standard, as the following example illustrates:

void f(void *); // #1
void f(...); // #2
template<int N> void g() {
  f(0*N); // calls #2; used to call #1
}

The following gcc bug report [C++11] [DR 903] zero-valued integer constant expression should prefer conversion to pointer shows that the gcc team originally thought this was a C++17 change but later changed it to be in effect in C++11.

We can see in the head revision of gcc(6.0) this is fixed (see it live) and produces a diagnostic for all the cases clang does:

error: could not convert '(1 - 1)' from 'int' to 'std::shared_ptr<int>'
 f( 1 - 1 );           // compiles fine in gcc, fails in clang
    ~~^~~

error: could not convert 'i' from 'const int' to 'std::shared_ptr<int>'
 f( i );               // fails to compile in gcc and clang
      ^

error: could not convert '(0 - 0)' from 'int' to 'std::shared_ptr<int>'
 f( i - 0 );           // compiles fine in gcc, fails in clang
    ~~^~~
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  • Good find, particularily the rationale against arbitrary constant expressions. – Peter - Reinstate Monica Dec 29 '15 at 19:00
6

Because a null pointer constant is defined not just as a compile-time integral constant with value 0, but as an integer literal with value zero (or as a prvalue of type std::nullptr_t, of course). C++14 (N4140), 4.10/1.

So actually, only the first line f(0) should compile, all the other ones should provoke at least a diagnostic message from a conforming compiler.

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  • g++ does not provide any diagnostics even in -pedantic mode – Slava Dec 29 '15 at 17:07
  • @Slava Would technically be worth a bug report, then, if there's not one already. – Angew is no longer proud of SO Dec 29 '15 at 17:09
  • N3242 says "A null pointer constant is an integral constant expression" - do you have a link for C++14 which says literal? – Martin Bonner supports Monica Dec 29 '15 at 17:12
  • Never mind, N3797 says literal just as you quoted. Interesting change from C++11 (and C) to C++14. – Martin Bonner supports Monica Dec 29 '15 at 17:14
  • 4
    @Angew It's a post-C++11 DR that's intended to apply to C++11, so it's supposed to be rejected in C++11 mode too. That's also why N4140 lists it as an incompatibility with C++03 rather than with C++11 ([diff.cpp03.conv]). – user743382 Dec 29 '15 at 17:38

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