235

Is it possible to have a function with two returns like this:

function test($testvar)
{
  // Do something

  return $var1;
  return $var2;
}

If so, how would I be able to get each return separately?

8
  • 1
    What exactly are you trying to accomplish? Surely if you explained your real problem, someone here could help you arrive at an elegant solution. Aug 10, 2010 at 17:55
  • 3
    Question does not differentiate between either/or one of two values, both two of two values, or new concept lazy evaluation one then possibly two of two values. The first is trivial with any kind of conditional flow. The second is permitted in python: q, r = divmod(x, y); as well as Lisp; PHP requires the list($q,$r)=twovals(); hack, where function twovals(){ return array($a, $b); }. Lazy evaluation is rather advanced and has not caught on in PHP yet. Since the question is not precise, recommend not using this entry as definitive reference for this topic.
    – DragonLord
    Aug 15, 2012 at 22:54
  • 7
    If you need both the values, return them in an array. Nov 12, 2015 at 15:33
  • 3
    @DragonLord in PHP 7.1, you can use the short list syntax Nov 14, 2016 at 15:37
  • 1
    There is a duplicate question, but with more concise answers thus it will get you faster to the point: Returning 2 values from a function. Mar 25, 2017 at 21:46

32 Answers 32

457

Technically, you can't return more than one value. However, there are multiple ways to work around that limitation. The way that acts most like returning multiple values, is with the list keyword:

function getXYZ()
{
    return array(4,5,6);
}

list($x,$y,$z) = getXYZ();

// Afterwards: $x == 4 && $y == 5 && $z == 6
// (This will hold for all samples unless otherwise noted)

Technically, you're returning an array and using list to store the elements of that array in different values instead of storing the actual array. Using this technique will make it feel most like returning multiple values.

The list solution is a rather php-specific one. There are a few languages with similar structures, but more languages that don't. There's another way that's commonly used to "return" multiple values and it's available in just about every language (in one way or another). However, this method will look quite different so may need some getting used to.

// note that I named the arguments $a, $b and $c to show that
// they don't need to be named $x, $y and $z
function getXYZ(&$a, &$b, &$c)
{
    $a = 4;
    $b = 5;
    $c = 6; 
}

getXYZ($x, $y, $z);

This technique is also used in some functions defined by php itself (e.g. $count in str_replace, $matches in preg_match). This might feel quite different from returning multiple values, but it is worth at least knowing about.

A third method is to use an object to hold the different values you need. This is more typing, so it's not used quite as often as the two methods above. It may make sense to use this, though, when using the same set of variables in a number of places (or of course, working in a language that doesn't support the above methods or allows you to do this without extra typing).

class MyXYZ
{
    public $x;
    public $y;
    public $z;
}

function getXYZ()
{
    $out = new MyXYZ();
    
    $out->x = 4;
    $out->y = 5;
    $out->z = 6;
    
    return $out;
}

$xyz = getXYZ();

$x = $xyz->x;
$y = $xyz->y;
$z = $xyz->z;

The above methods sum up the main ways of returning multiple values from a function. However, there are variations on these methods. The most interesting variations to look at, are those in which you are actually returning an array, simply because there's so much you can do with arrays in PHP.

First, we can simply return an array and not treat it as anything but an array:

function getXYZ()
{
    return array(1,2,3);
}

$array = getXYZ();

$x = $array[0];
$y = $array[1];
$z = $array[2];

The most interesting part about the code above is that the code inside the function is the same as in the very first example I provided; only the code calling the function changed. This means that it's up to the one calling the function how to treat the result the function returns.

Alternatively, one could use an associative array:

function getXYZ()
{
    return array('x' => 4,
                 'y' => 5,
                 'z' => 6);
}

$array = getXYZ();

$x = $array['x'];
$y = $array['y'];
$z = $array['z'];

Php does have the compact function that allows you to do same as above but while writing less code. (Well, the sample won't have less code, but a real world application probably would.) However, I think the amount of typing saving is minimal and it makes the code harder to read, so I wouldn't do it myself. Nevertheless, here's a sample:

function getXYZ()
{
    $x = 4;
    $y = 5;
    $z = 6;
    
    return compact('x', 'y', 'z');
}

$array = getXYZ();

$x = $array['x'];
$y = $array['y'];
$z = $array['z'];

It should be noted that while compact does have a counterpart in extract that could be used in the calling code here, but since it's a bad idea to use it (especially for something as simple as this) I won't even give a sample for it. The problem is that it will do "magic" and create variables for you, while you can't see which variables are created without going to other parts of the code.

Finally, I would like to mention that list doesn't really play well with associative array. The following will do what you expect:

function getXYZ()
{
    return array('x' => 4,
                 'y' => 5,
                 'z' => 6);
}

$array = getXYZ();

list($x, $y, $z) = getXYZ();

However, the following will do something different:

function getXYZ()
{
    return array('x' => 4,
                 'z' => 6,
                 'y' => 5);
}

$array = getXYZ();

list($x, $y, $z) = getXYZ();

// Pay attention: $y == 6 && $z == 5

If you used list with an associative array, and someone else has to change the code in the called function in the future (which may happen just about any situation) it may suddenly break, so I would recommend against combining list with associative arrays.

10
  • 2
    Also: return compact('var1', 'var2', 'var3');
    – bjudson
    Aug 26, 2010 at 22:37
  • 4
    Using List() is a great answer to a simular problem I had. this is an excellent way validate and return multiple variables back into a function. a quick look at the php docs will shed more light on this function and perhaps make it more clear. php.net/manual/en/function.list.php .. thanks Jasper!
    – JustinP
    Oct 19, 2012 at 20:22
  • 3
    +1 for such an extensive answer, especially to such a broad, general question. Despite that, this answer has helped me immensely.
    – Lee Blake
    Sep 2, 2014 at 18:15
  • 2
    @earl3s Document the behavior, it's a common paradigm. As you can see with the two built-in functions I linked to, it's a thing that php itself does as well. Of course, you should generally not modify variables of which the value serves as input, but having variables of which the initial value is not used and for which the only purpose is setting its value as sort of an output is a really normal thing to do. Just be sure to document it as such (if it's an external thing).
    – Jasper
    Sep 3, 2016 at 21:53
  • 2
    @Mikey Historical reasons. This answer was originally posted on a different question, which was deleted for being an exact duplicate of this one (despite the fact that it was actually older). The answer was moved to this question later than the last visit of the one who asked this question.
    – Jasper
    May 1, 2017 at 8:42
182

There is no way of returning 2 variables. Although, you can propagate an array and return it; create a conditional to return a dynamic variable, etc.

For instance, this function would return $var2

function wtf($blahblah = true) {
    $var1 = "ONe";
    $var2 = "tWo";

    if($blahblah === true) {
      return $var2;
    }
    return $var1;
}

In application:

echo wtf();
//would echo: tWo
echo wtf("not true, this is false");
//would echo: ONe

If you wanted them both, you could modify the function a bit

function wtf($blahblah = true) {
    $var1 = "ONe";
    $var2 = "tWo";

    if($blahblah === true) {
      return $var2;
    }

    if($blahblah == "both") {
      return array($var1, $var2);
    }

    return $var1;
}

echo wtf("both")[0]
//would echo: ONe
echo wtf("both")[1]
//would echo: tWo

list($first, $second) = wtf("both")
// value of $first would be $var1, value of $second would be $var2
4
  • 15
    If only PHP had Perl's wantarray()
    – Marc B
    Aug 26, 2010 at 22:22
  • 11
    IMHO this answer would be improved if it omitted the first part, which discusses how to return one or a different value, depending on some condition. I'm certain that 99.999+% of the people coming to this discussion want to know how to return both values at the same time. See the highest voted answer. Apr 3, 2019 at 21:22
  • 1
    @MarcB If Only PHP and Perl had Pythons automatic tupling/untupling – return a, b, c and a, b, c = func() Jul 24, 2020 at 9:01
  • 2
    @NilsLindemann: php 7.1 does, via array destructuring syntax: return [$a, $b, $c]; and [$x, $y, $z] = func();. (That is a trivial number of characters more than the Python syntax, and is the intended way to achieve that result in PHP. And really, PHP always had equivalent functionality, it just required slightly more verbose syntax.) Dec 21, 2020 at 23:16
80

In your example, the second return will never happen - the first return is the last thing PHP will run. If you need to return multiple values, return an array:

function test($testvar) {

    return array($var1, $var2);
}

$result = test($testvar);
echo $result[0]; // $var1
echo $result[1]; // $var2
3
  • 20
    You can also do: list($result_1, result_2) = test($testvar);
    – Tim Cooper
    Aug 10, 2010 at 18:00
  • @Tim Cooper: result_2 or $result_2? Dec 12, 2019 at 20:37
  • @PeterMortensen: $result_2
    – Tim Cooper
    Dec 12, 2019 at 20:45
68

Since PHP 7.1 we have proper destructuring for lists. Thereby you can do things like this:

$test = [1, 2, 3, 4];
[$a, $b, $c, $d] = $test;
echo($a);
> 1
echo($d);
> 4

In a function this would look like this:

function multiple_return() {
    return ['this', 'is', 'a', 'test'];
}

[$first, $second, $third, $fourth] = multiple_return();
echo($first);
> this
echo($fourth);
> test

Destructuring is a very powerful tool. It's capable of destructuring key=>value pairs as well:

["a" => $a, "b" => $b, "c" => $c] = ["a" => 1, "b" => 2, "c" => 3];

Take a look at the new feature page for PHP 7.1:

New features

4
  • 5
    I wish StackOverflow would have a feature like 'featured answer' even when is not the accepted by the time of the creation of the question because this answer here is quite useful and updated, but it's off-topic, of course.
    – Jonatas CD
    Mar 9, 2019 at 20:43
  • 3
    @JonatasCD - not sure why you say this answer is "off-topic". In php 7.1 it is the most convenient way to create and handle multiple return values from a function. So for newer php versions, its a superior answer to the original accepted answer. Apr 3, 2019 at 21:13
  • @ToolmakerSteve I think you misunderstood me. "off-topic" to the question was my suggestion of being able to change what was the accepted question based on future implementations. It was nothing against your answer ;)
    – Jonatas CD
    Apr 4, 2019 at 15:10
  • @JonatasCD - Ahh that explains it. (Isn't my answer, I was just puzzled.) At least a tag that says "this is more up-to-date than the accepted answer" Maybe three people have to agree with that tag, and then it becomes featured. :) Apr 4, 2019 at 18:31
28

In PHP 5.5 there is also a new concept: generators, where you can yield multiple values from a function:

function hasMultipleValues() {
    yield "value1";
    yield "value2";
}

$values = hasMultipleValues();
foreach ($values as $val) {
    // $val will first be "value1" then "value2"
}
0
19

Or you can pass by reference:

function byRef($x, &$a, &$b)
{
    $a = 10 * $x;
    $b = 100 * $x;
}

$a = 0;
$b = 0;

byRef(10, $a, $b);

echo $a . "\n";
echo $b;

This would output

100
1000
18

For PHP 7.1.0 onwards, you can use the new syntax (instead of the list function):

/**
* @return  array  [foo, bar]
*/
function getFooAndBar(): array {
    return ['foo', 'bar'];
}

[$foo, $bar] = getFooAndBar();

print 'Hello '. $foo . ' and ' . $bar;

It's OK for me if you want to return 2-3 variables, otherwise you should use an object with the desired properties.

10

I know that I am pretty late, but there is a nice and simple solution for this problem.
It's possible to return multiple values at once using destructuring.

function test()
{
    return [ 'model' => 'someValue' , 'data' => 'someothervalue'];
}

Now you can use this

$result = test();
extract($result);

extract creates a variable for each member in the array, named after that member. You can therefore now access $model and $data

1
  • 1
    NOTE: be careful that the keys (here model and data) don't already exist as variables. If they do, use the prefix parameter of extract to avoid conflicts. Apr 3, 2019 at 21:17
7

You can return multiple arrays and scalars from a function

function x()
{
    $a=array("a","b","c");
    $b=array("e","f");
    return array('x',$a,$b);
}

list ($m,$n,$o)=x();

echo $m."\n";
print_r($n);
print_r($o);
7

Its not possible have two return statement. However it doesn't throw error but when function is called you will receive only first return statement value. We can use return of array to get multiple values in return. For Example:

function test($testvar)
{
  // do something
  //just assigning a string for example, we can assign any operation result
  $var1 = "result1";
  $var2 = "result2";
  return array('value1' => $var1, 'value2' => $var2);
}
6

Best Practice is to put your returned variables into array and then use list() to assign array values to variables.

<?php

function add_subt($val1, $val2) {
    $add = $val1 + $val2;
    $subt = $val1 - $val2;

    return array($add, $subt);
}

list($add_result, $subt_result) = add_subt(20, 7);
echo "Add: " . $add_result . '<br />';
echo "Subtract: " . $subt_result . '<br />';

?>
5

Functions, by definition, only return one value.

However, as you assumed, that value can be an array.

So you can certainly do something like:

<?PHP
function myfunc($a,$b){
   return array('foo'=>$a,'bar'=>$b);
}
print_r(myfunc('baz','bork'));

That said, it's worth taking a moment and thinking about whatever you're trying to solve. While returning a complex result value (like an array, or an object) is perfectly valid, if you're thinking is that "I want to return two values", you might be designing poorly. Without more detail in your question, it's hard to say, but it never hurts to stop and think twice.

5

The answer that's given the green tick above is actually incorrect. You can return multiple values in PHP, if you return an array. See the following code for an example:

<?php

function small_numbers()
{
    return array (0, 1, 2);
}

list ($zero, $one, $two) = small_numbers();

This code is actually copied from the following page on PHP's website: http://php.net/manual/en/functions.returning-values.php I've also used the same sort of code many times myself, so can confirm that it's good and that it works.

1
  • That answer referred to the code example in the question, so it is not strictly incorrect. But the question is ambiguous. The intent is probably to return two values from one function call. Dec 12, 2019 at 21:22
5

Yes, you can use an object :-)

But the simplest way is to return an array:

return array('value1', 'value2', 'value3', '...');
4

I have implement like this for multiple return value PHP function. be nice with your code. thank you.

 <?php
    function multi_retun($aa)
    {
        return array(1,3,$aa);
    }
    list($one,$two,$three)=multi_retun(55);
    echo $one;
    echo $two;
    echo $three;
    ?>
3

Functions in PHP can return only one variable. you could use variables with global scope, you can return array, or you can pass variable by reference to the function and than change value,.. but all of that will decrease readability of your code. I would suggest that you look into the classes.

3

Thought I would expand on a few of the responses from above....

class nameCheck{

public $name;

public function __construct(){
    $this->name = $name;
}

function firstName(){
            // If a name has been entered..
    if(!empty($this->name)){
        $name = $this->name;
        $errflag = false;
                    // Return a array with both the name and errflag
        return array($name, $errflag);
            // If its empty..
    }else if(empty($this->name)){
        $errmsg = 'Please enter a name.';
        $errflag = true;
                    // Return both the Error message and Flag
        return array($errmsg, $errflag);
    }
}

}


if($_POST['submit']){

$a = new nameCheck;
$a->name = $_POST['name'];
//  Assign a list of variables from the firstName function
list($name, $err) = $a->firstName();

// Display the values..
echo 'Name: ' . $name;
echo 'Errflag: ' . $err;
}

?>
<form method="post" action="<?php $_SERVER['PHP_SELF']; ?>" >
<input name="name"  />
<input type="submit" name="submit" value="submit" />
</form>

This will give you a input field and a submit button once submitted, if the name input field is empty it will return the error flag and a message. If the name field has a value it will return the value/name and a error flag of 0 for false = no errors. Hope this helps!

3

Some might prefer returning multiple values as object:

function test() {
    $object = new stdClass();

    $object->x = 'value 1';
    $object->y = 'value 2';

    return $object;
}

And call it like this:

echo test()->x;

Or:

$test = test();
echo $test->y;
3

Yes and no. You can't return more than one variable / object, but as you suggest, you can put them into an array and return that.

There is no limit to the nesting of arrays, so you can just package them up that way to return.

0
2

You can always only return one variable which might be an array. But You can change global variables from inside the function. That is most of the time not very good style, but it works. In classes you usually change class varbiables from within functions without returning them.

2

PHP 7.1 Update

Return an array.

function test($testvar)
{
  // Do something
  return [$var1, $var2];
}

then use that like below:

[$value1, $value2] = test($testvar);
1
1

The answer is no. When the parser reaches the first return statement, it will direct control back to the calling function - your second return statement will never be executed.

1
  • Strictly speaking, yes. But the question is ambiguous. Perhaps the intent was to return two value from one function call. Dec 12, 2019 at 20:49
1

Add all variables in an array and then finally return the array.

function test($testvar)
{
  // do something
  return array("var1" => $var1, "var2" => @var2);
}

And then

$myTest = test($myTestVar);
//$myTest["var1"] and $myTest["var2"] will be usable
1

I think eliego has explained the answer clearly. But if you want to return both values, put them into a array and return it.

function test($testvar)
{
  // do something

  return array('var1'=>$var1,'var2'=>$var2);
//defining a key would be better some times   
}

//to access return values

$returned_values = test($testvar);

echo $returned_values['var1'];
echo $returned_values['var2'];
0
0
<?php
function foo(){
  $you = 5;
  $me = 10;
  return $you;
  return $me;
}

echo foo();
//output is just 5 alone so we cant get second one it only retuns first one so better go with array


function goo(){
  $you = 5;
  $me = 10;
  return $you_and_me =  array($you,$me);
}

var_dump(goo()); // var_dump result is array(2) { [0]=> int(5) [1]=> int(10) } i think thats fine enough

?>
0

Languages which allow multiple returns usually just convert the multiple values into a data structure.

For example, in Python you can return multiple values. However, they're actually just being returned as one tuple.

So you can return multiple values in PHP by just creating a simple array and returning that.

0

You can get the values of two or more variables by setting them by reference:

function t(&$a, &$b) {
    $a = 1;
    $b = 2;
}


t($a, $b);

echo $a . '  ' . $b;

Output:

1 2
0
-1

Does PHP still use "out parameters"? If so, you can use the syntax to modify one or more of the parameters going in to your function then. You would then be free to use the modified variable after your function returns.

-1
$var1 = 0;
$var2 = 0;

function test($testvar, &$var1 , &$var2)
{
  $var1 = 1;
  $var2 = 2;
  return;
}
test("", $var1, $var2);

// var1 = 1, var2 = 2 

It's not a good way, but I think we can set two variables in a function at the same time.

-2

This is the easiest way to do it:

public function selectAllUsersByRole($userRole, $selector) {

    $this->userRole = $userLevel;
    $this->selector = $selector;

    $sql = "SELECT * FROM users WHERE role <= ? AND del_stat = 0";
    $stm = $this->connect()->prepare($sql); // Connect function in Dbh connect to database file
    $stm->execute([$this->userRole]); // This is PHP 7. Use array($this->userRole) for PHP 5

    $usersIdArray = array();
    $usersFNameArray = array();
    $usersLNameArray = array();

    if($stm->rowCount()) {
        while($row = $stm->fetch()) {

            array_push($usersIdArray,    $row['id']);
            array_push($usersFNameArray, $row['f_name']);
            array_push($usersLNameArray, $row['l_name']);

            // You can return only $row['id'] or f_name or ...
            // I used the array because it's most used.
        }
    }
    if($this->selector == 1) {
        return $usersIdArray;
    }elseif($this->selector == 2) {
        return $usersFNameArray;
    }elseif($this->selector == 3) {
        return $usersLNameArray;
    }

}

How can we call this function?

$idData = $selectAllUsers->selectAllUsersByLevel($userRole, 0);
print_r($idData);
$idFName = $selectAllUsers->selectAllUsersByLevel($userRole, 1);
print_r($idFname);

That's it. Very easy.

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