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I'm still beginner in python world and one of the things that made my head turns.. is the range built-in and the list indexes.

How can I know if the range would or wouldn't take the last number?

For example

  • range(15) will it count to 15 or 14?
  • range(1,15) will it count to 15 or 14?
  • List_1 [ :15] will it count to 16 (last element) or rest at 15(element before it)
  • list_1[1: ] supposing that the list is 16 item will it count to the last element ?
  • List_1[1:15] will it count to last element or the one before it?
  • 2
    read the documentation docs.python.org/2/library/functions.html#range – Padraic Cunningham Dec 30 '15 at 14:15
  • 2
    Try putting these into python and printing them out! – Untitled123 Dec 30 '15 at 15:30
  • You should think of slice indexes as being like thin tick marks on an graph axis, with one before the first item, one between each pair of items, and one after the last item. The result is one more tick than items. For 'abc' the result would be '0a1b2c3'. Seq[m:n] includes the n-m items between ticks m and n. In slice coordinates, item indexes would be .5, 1,5, 2.5, ... . Some languages round down to 0, 1, 2, ..., others up to 1, 2, 3, ... . – Terry Jan Reedy Dec 31 '15 at 2:52
  • Thanks Terry for this explanation – Joseph Medhat Dec 31 '15 at 12:17
1
for i in range(15):
    print i #will print out 0..14

for i in range(1, 15):
    print i # will print out 1..14


for i in range (a, b, s):
    print i # will print a..b-1 counting by s. interestingly if while counting by the step 's' you exceed b, it will stop at the last 'reachable' number, example

for i in range(1, 10, 3):
    print i

> 1
> 4
> 7

List Splicing:

a = "hello" # there are 5 characters, so the characters are accessible on indexes 0..4

a[1] = 'e'
a[1:2] = 'e' # because the number after the colon is not reached.

a[x:y] = all characters starting from the character AT index 'x' and ending at the character which is before 'y'

a[x:] = all characters starting from x and to the end of the string

In the future, if you ever wonder what the behavior of python is like, you can try it out in the python shell. just type python in the terminal and you can enter any lines you want (though this is mostly convenient for one-liners rather than scripts).

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks very much for this reply.. But in the list splicing as what i understood from your reply a[a:b] will include from a till the last element before b – Joseph Medhat Dec 30 '15 at 14:26
0

The best way to clarify such doubts is to play with the REPL:

>>> range(10)
range(0, 10)
>>> list(range(10))
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
>>> x = list(range(10))
>>> x[:3]
[0, 1, 2]
>>> x[:1]
[0]
>>> x[1:10]
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
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  • A complete beginner wouldn't know what REPL is - I just googled it. Isn't it easier to just play around with it in your program? – Marijke Vonk Dec 30 '15 at 14:17
  • @MarijkeVonk The REPL is instantaneous, in your program you still need print statements and clicking the run button everytime – Caridorc Dec 30 '15 at 14:18
  • Thank you for your replu – Joseph Medhat Dec 30 '15 at 14:20
  • You mean it will always leave the last element? – Joseph Medhat Dec 30 '15 at 14:21
  • range is half-open -> the last element is never included – Caridorc Dec 30 '15 at 14:22
0

Well, here is a much prose version of previous answers

  1. range(15) actually generates a list with indexes from 0 through 14
  2. range(0, 15) does the same; except that both starting and ending indexes are specified
  3. list[:14] accesses contents of list including 14th index (15th element)
  4. list[1:] access contents of list from 1st index (2nd element) until (and including) the last element
| improve this answer | |
  • list[:14] will access indices 0 to 13, not the 14th index. – Jeremy Fisher Jan 12 '16 at 14:23

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