6

In a previous job we had to compare item x with item x-1 for a lot of data (~billion rows). As this was done on SQL Server 2008 R2 we had to use a self-join. It was slow.

I thought I'd experiment with the lag function; this would be hugely valuable if fast. I found it ~ 2 to 3 of times faster but as it should be a simple operation under the hood, and as its query plan/table scanning was simpler/vastly reduced, I'm very disappointed. Code to reproduce below.

Create DB:

IF EXISTS (SELECT name 
           FROM sys.databases 
           WHERE name = N'TestDBForLag')
   DROP DATABASE TestDBForLag
GO

create database TestDBForLag
ALTER DATABASE TestDBForLag SET RECOVERY SIMPLE 
go

use TestDBForLag
go

set nocount on

create table big (g binary(16) not null)
go

begin transaction

declare @c int = 0

while @c < 100
begin
    insert into big(g) values(cast(newid() as binary(16)))
    set @c += 1
end
commit

go 10000 -- n repeats of last batch, "big" now has 1,000,000 rows

alter table big
    add constraint clustered_PK primary key clustered (g)

Queries:

set statistics time on
set statistics io on

-- new style
select  
    g, lag(g, 1) over (order by g) as xx
from big
order by g

-- old style
select  obig.g, 
(
    select max(g)
    from big as ibig
    where ibig.g < obig.g
) as xx
from big as obig
order by g

You can look at the actual/estimated query plans yourself, but here's the results of the stats (queries run twice to discount compilation time):

(1000000 row(s) affected)
Table 'Worktable'. {edit: everything zero here}.

**Table 'big'. Scan count 1, logical reads 3109**, {edit: everything else is zero here}.

SQL Server Execution Times: CPU time = 1045 ms,  elapsed time = 3516 ms.

---

(1000000 row(s) affected)

**Table 'big'. Scan count 1000001, logical reads 3190609**, {edit: everything else is zero here}.

SQL Server Execution Times:CPU time = 2683 ms,  elapsed time = 3439 ms.

So, lag takes 1 scan + 3109 reads and takes ~1 sec cpu time, a complex self-join which has to repeatedly walk the btree takes 1 million scans + 3.2 million reads takes ~2.7 secs.

I don't see any reason for this rotten performance. Any ideas?

Running on ThinkServer 140, 8G ram (so entirely mem resident), dual core, no disk contention. I'm satisfied that the time to transfer result sets to client, which is running on the same machine, is negligable.

select @@version 

returns:

Microsoft SQL Server 2014 - 12.0.4213.0 (X64) Developer Edition (64-bit) 
on Windows NT 6.1 <X64> (Build 7601: Service Pack 1)

Edit:

per @vnov's comment, I did carefully discount client overhead before I posted. I'm looking at CPU time not overall time. Test:

select *
from big

Table 'big'. Scan count 1, logical reads 3109, {rest zero}
SQL Server Execution Times: CPU time = 125 ms,  elapsed time = 2840 ms.

select count(*)
from big

Table 'big'. Scan count 1, logical reads 3109, {rest zero}
SQL Server Execution Times: CPU time = 109 ms,  elapsed time = 129 ms.

lag just should not add anything significant AFAICS, never mind an order of magnitude.



Edit2:

@Frisbee did not see why I thought lag was poor. Basically the algorithm is to remember a previous value and deliver it n rows later. If n = 1 that's even more trivial so I did some code using cursors, with and without the homemade lag, and measured. I also trivially summarised the results so it wasn't returning huge result sets, per vnov's point. Both cursor & selects gave the same results of sumg = 127539666, sumglag = 127539460. Code uses same DB + table as created above.

The select version:

select 
    sum(cast(g as tinyint)) as sumg
from (
    select g
    from big
) as xx


select 
    sum(cast(g as tinyint)) as sumg, 
    sum(cast(glag as tinyint)) as sumglag
from (
    select g, lag(g, 1) over (order by g) as glag
    from big
) as xx

I didn't do a bulk measurement but by observation the plain select vs lag here was fairly consistently ~360-400ms vs ~1700-1900ms, so 4 or 5 times slower.

For the cursors, top one emulates first select, bottom one emulates select with lag:

---------- nonlagging batch --------------
use TestDBForLag
set nocount on

DECLARE crsr CURSOR FAST_FORWARD READ_ONLY FOR 
select g from big order by g 

DECLARE @g binary(16), @sumg int = 0
OPEN crsr

FETCH NEXT FROM crsr INTO @g
WHILE (@@fetch_status <> -1)
BEGIN
    IF (@@fetch_status <> -2)
    BEGIN
        set @sumg += cast(@g as tinyint)
    END
    FETCH NEXT FROM crsr INTO @g
END

CLOSE crsr
DEALLOCATE crsr

select @sumg as sumg

go 300


---------- lagging batch --------------
use TestDBForLag
set nocount on

DECLARE crsr CURSOR FAST_FORWARD READ_ONLY FOR 
select g from big order by g

DECLARE @g binary(16), @sumg int = 0 
DECLARE @glag binary(16) = 0, @sumglag int = 0
OPEN crsr

FETCH NEXT FROM crsr INTO @g
WHILE (@@fetch_status <> -1)
BEGIN
    IF (@@fetch_status <> -2)
    BEGIN
        set @sumg += cast(@g as tinyint)
        set @sumglag += cast(@glag as tinyint)  -- the only ...
        set @glag = @g  -- ... differences
    END
    FETCH NEXT FROM crsr INTO @g
END

CLOSE crsr
DEALLOCATE crsr

select @sumg as sumg, @sumglag as sumglag

go 300

Run the above with the SQL profiler on (remove SQL:Batch Starting event), takes ~2.5 hours for me, save the trace as a table called 'trace', then run this to get average duration

-- trace save duration as microseconds, 
-- divide by 1000 to get back to milli
select 
    cast(textdata as varchar(8000)) as textdata, 
    avg(duration/1000) as avg_duration_ms
from trace
group by cast(textdata as varchar(8000))

for me the nonlagging cursor takes an average of 13.65 secs, the cursor-emulating-lag takes 16.04 secs. Most of the extra time of the latter will come from the overhead of the interpreter dealing with the extra statements (I'd expect it to be far less if implemented in C), but in any event that's less than 20% extra to calculate lag.

So, does this explanation sound reasonable, and can anyone suggest why lag is so poorly performing in a select statement?

6
  • What is the g you are lagging over? the scan still has to find the -1 g on each scanned row, this could be/is a lot of work if g isn't the clustered key
    – automatic
    Dec 30, 2015 at 15:18
  • Check the fragmentation on the PK
    – paparazzo
    Dec 30, 2015 at 17:04
  • @Frisbee: All data is ram-resident so any fragmentation is irrelevant - jumping around in mem is nothing like a head seek on a disk. But just in case I misunderstood you, DBCC SHOWCONTIG('dbo.big') shows a table with avg. page density of 99.71% and logical/extent fragmentation of 0.03% and 0.52% Dec 30, 2015 at 18:19
  • OK, I am just not getting the how you consider it rotten performance when it is not much longer than a select *. But I have nothing of value to add.
    – paparazzo
    Dec 30, 2015 at 18:46
  • @Frisbee: Point is it's no longer than a select in duration due to outputting 1E6 rows of data, but look at the CPU time, not clock-on-wall duration - very different. See edited post addressing vnov's similar point. Dec 30, 2015 at 19:17

3 Answers 3

7

Examine execution plans of both variants and you'll see what is going on. I use a free version of SQL Sentry Plan Explorer for this.

I'm comparing these three queries (plus one more with OUTER APPLY):

select count(*)
from big;

-- new style
select  
    g, lag(g) over (order by g) as xx
from big
order by g;

-- old style
select  obig.g, 
(
    select max(g)
    from big as ibig
    where ibig.g < obig.g
) as xx
from big as obig
order by g;

stats

q1

q2

q3

1) The LAG is implemented using Window Spool, which provides twice the number of rows (1,999,999) from a temporary Worktable (it is in memory in this case, but still). The Window Spool doesn't cache all 1,000,000 rows in the Worktable, it caches only the window size.

The Window Spool operator expands each row into the set of rows that represents the window associated with it.

There are many other less heavy operators in the plan as well. The point here is that LAG is not implemented as you do it in your cursor test.

2) The plan for the old style query is pretty good. Optimizer is smart to scan the table once and do an index seek with TOP for each row to calculate MAX. Yes, it is million seeks, but everything is in memory, so it is relatively fast.

3) Hover over thick arrows between plan operators and you'll see the actual data size. It is twice as big for Window Spool. So, when everything is in memory and CPU bound, it becomes important.

4) Your old style query could be rewritten as:

select  obig.g, A.g
from big as obig
OUTER APPLY
(
    SELECT TOP(1) ibig.g
    FROM big as ibig
    WHERE ibig.g < obig.g
    ORDER BY ibig.g DESC
) AS A
order by obig.g;

q4

, which is a bit more efficient (see the CPU column in the screenshot).


So, LAG is very efficient in the number of pages read, but uses CPU quite a lot.

2
  • Wot a fab answer, accepted, thanks! Will examine query plan more carefully next time. Regarding your points 1) why on earth do something so inefficient? There must be a good reason for it. Also FYI modify the lag from 1 to 9999, then 10,000 and see a huge slowdown - odd. 2) agreed, MS must have optimised it to death to get such impressive performance 3) yes, and your tool shows it better than MSSQL's, which should indicate by arrow thickness but didn't here 4) I've experimented with those alternatives extensively, you get similar query plan and no actual performance improvement. Again, thanks Jan 6, 2016 at 16:58
  • 1
    I don't remember the details, but 10,000 is some threshold for the window size in the optimizer after which in this case the Worktable goes from memory to the tempdb. Check Worktable IO and you'll see that it jumps from 0 to 8M. Also, I wasn't quite correct in describing how Window Spool works. You'd better find a proper description somewhere else. The plan shows that for LAG(1) Window Spool provides 1,999,999 rows and for LAG(10000) is provides 1,990,000 rows. It must be storing in the Worktable not all 1,000,000 rows, but only the window size. Jan 6, 2016 at 23:22
0

What is the g you are lagging over? the scan still has to find the -1 g on each scanned row, this could be/is a lot of work if g isn't the clustered key

1
  • Quite. Hence clustered PK on g (the only col in the table) I'd put on the table when it was created. And given the "Scan count 1, logical reads 3109" for lag it's pretty evident that's not where the problem is. In fact, that was the whole point. Dec 30, 2015 at 15:32
0

The lag itself may not actually take much time, since g is the clustered primary key. If you try:

select * from big

it takes lots of time as well.

And your query cannot be faster than this, because it processes the same amount of data. There must be lots of IO going on. I am not an expert on this, but the table size is aprox. 24MB and sql server reads the data by 8KB blocks, so this is aprox 3000 physical reads. Run the query and look at the performance monitor / process explorer, disk IO specifically.

1
  • Good point, however see main post for response edit. As I said, though, all data is mem resident. No disk IO. Dec 30, 2015 at 15:57

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