8

I have a Julia function in a file. Let's say it is the below. Now I want to pass arguments into this function. I tried doing

julia filename.jl randmatstat(5) 

but this gives an error that '(' token is unexpected. Not sure what the solution would be. I am also a little torn on if there is a main function / how to write a full solution using Julia. For example what is the starting / entry point of a Julia Program?

function randmatstat(t)
    n = 5
    v = zeros(t)
    w = zeros(t)
    for i = 1:t
        a = randn(n,n)
        b = randn(n,n)
        c = randn(n,n)
        d = randn(n,n)
        P = [a b c d]
        Q = [a b; c d]
        v[i] = trace((P.'*P)^4)
        w[i] = trace((Q.'*Q)^4)
    end
    std(v)/mean(v), std(w)/mean(w)
end
3

Julia doesn't have an "entry point" as such. When you call julia myscript.jl from the terminal, you're essentially asking julia to execute the script and exit. As such, it needs to be a script. If all you have in your script is a function definition, then it won't do much unless you later call that function from your script.

As for arguments, if you call julia myscript.jl 1 2 3 4, all the remaining arguments (i.e. in this case, 1, 2, 3 and 4) become an array of strings with the special name ARGS. You can use this special variable to access the input arguments.

e.g. if you have a julia script which simply says:

# in julia mytest.jl
show(ARGS)

Then calling this from the linux terminal will give this result:

<bashprompt> $ julia mytest.jl 1 two "three and four"
UTF8String["1","two","three and four"]

EDIT: So, from what I understand from your program, you probably want to do something like this (note: in julia, the function needs to be defined before it's called).

# in file myscript.jl
function randmatstat(t)
    n = 5
    v = zeros(t)
    w = zeros(t)
    for i = 1:t
        a = randn(n,n)
        b = randn(n,n)
        c = randn(n,n)
        d = randn(n,n)
        P = [a b c d]
        Q = [a b; c d]
        v[i] = trace((P.'*P)^4)
        w[i] = trace((Q.'*Q)^4)
    end
    std(v)/mean(v), std(w)/mean(w)
end

t = parse(Int64, ARGS[1])
(a,b) = randmatstat(t)
print("a is $a, and b is $b\n")

And then call this from your linux terminal like so:

julia myscript.jl 5
  • Note: If you want output to the linux terminal from your script, you need to ask for it explicitly with the print command (or something equivalent). Also, this is just a demo, in a proper program you should be testing if the user gave the right number of arguments etc to prevent user error. – Tasos Papastylianou Jul 19 '16 at 14:56
  • Also, in case what you were after wasn't specifically running from the linux terminal, but just getting your result, and you're happy doing it in the interactive julia prompt, and you just want to know how to run a script, then all you need to do is include("myscript.jl") at the julia prompt – Tasos Papastylianou Jul 19 '16 at 14:59
5

You can try running like so:

julia -L filename.jl -E 'randmatstat(5)'

  • 1
    This will "work" but strictly speaking it is not the answer to OP's problem, as it bypasses the issue of "what's the entry point of a julia program". This simply ensures the function defined in the filename is loaded first, and then executes an arbitrary statement. It is worth clearing the misunderstanding that a function defined in a file can be called directly, as this likely stems from people coming from the matlab world. – Tasos Papastylianou Jul 19 '16 at 15:06
3

Add the following to your Julia file:

### original file
function randmatstat...
...
end

### new stuff
if length(ARGS)>0
    ret = eval(parse(join(ARGS," ")))
end
println(ret)

Now, you can run:

julia filename.jl "randmatstat(5)"

As attempted originally. Note the additional quotes added to make sure the parenthesis don't mess up the command.

Explanation: The ARGS variable is defined by Julia to hold the parameters to the command running the file. Since Julia is an interpreter, we can join these parameters to a string, parse it as Julia code, run it and print the result (the code corresponds to this description).

  • is there a way to capture the options used when starting julia? or those can only be retrieved via other constants? like julia -p 2 can be obtained with nprocs() – amrods Dec 30 '15 at 21:12
  • 1
    opts = Base.JLOptions() gives all the "raw" options used by Julia. The structure has several fields which need to be interpreted. Look at base/options.jl for details. Perhaps some OS specific way to get the command-line from the PID might also be an option ;) – Dan Getz Dec 30 '15 at 21:48

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