7

I want the visitor to be able to expand/collapse some sections, and am using:

<input onclick="return toggleDiv('xx')" 
       type="button" 
       class="button" 
       value="click here to expand/collapse"/>

and in the I have the function:

function toggleDiv(a){
  var e=document.getElementById(a);
  if(!e)return true;
  if(e.style.display=="none"){
    e.style.display="block"
  } else {
    e.style.display="none"
  }
  return true;
}

The first time a button is clicked it doesn't work, subsequent clicks (on any of the buttons) work OK.

There is related conversation here: Button needs to be clicked twice to trigger function

but I don't understand the answer (too technical;-), could someone help explain it please?

3
  • 2
    What's the definition/style of the 'xx' div?
    – Jaime
    Aug 10 '10 at 21:27
  • 1
    First thing I'd do is open up FireBug (firefox javascript deveper tool), set a breakpoint iside toggleDive, and step through, making sure everything is as I think it is. If you don't want to deal with that, you can set do alert(e.style.display) inside your function. That might shed some light on things. Aug 10 '10 at 21:30
  • Just after the first if statement, add this line: alert("display is '" + e.style.display + "'"); then run the code again. That should help you understand what's going on.
    – Douglas
    Aug 10 '10 at 21:55
11

The initial style on your 'xx' div may be causing some trouble...

Explanation

Say you have a stylesheet rule configured to make your divs initially hidden. Something like:

div { display: none }

(...where of course the selector (div) will probably be a little bit less broad)

This would appear to work correctly, in that the page will load with all of your div elements hidden ("collapsed"). However, there's no actual value for the style.display property on the elements themselves - they're merely inheriting the value from the stylesheet. So in your code, the test you're using to check if the element is hidden:

if(e.style.display=="none"){

...will fail, incorrectly identifying the target as being visible, and causing the style.display property to be set to "none" (which has no visible effect, since the element had already been hidden by the stylesheet). Then the next time the button is clicked, the value you set the last time around will cause the text to succeed, and your routine will set style.display to "block".

The easy way to correct for this is to simply reverse your test and check for "block":

  if(e.style.display=="block"){
    e.style.display="none"
  } else {
    e.style.display="block"
  }

...however, this will fall apart if you have some elements configured to be initially visible: you'll just run into the same problem in reverse, with the first button click failing to have any visible effect. For a more robust behavior, you'll need to test the style that's actually active on the element:

function getStyle(el, name)
{
  // the way of the DOM
  if ( document.defaultView && document.defaultView.getComputedStyle )
  {
    var style = document.defaultView.getComputedStyle(el, null);
    if ( style )
      return style[name];
  }
  // IE-specific
  else if ( el.currentStyle )
    return el.currentStyle[name];
  
  return null;
}

function toggleDiv(a){
  var e=document.getElementById(a);
  if(!e)return true;
  if(getStyle(e, "display") == "none"){
    e.style.display="block"
  } else {
    e.style.display="none"
  }
  return true;
}

Here we use a helper function, getStyle(), to retrieve the active value in a cross-platform manner. See also: getComputedStyle(), currentStyle

2
  • Further info: The page validates, and the same double-click first time is needed in Chrome, IE, Firefox
    – Baz
    Aug 10 '10 at 21:28
  • ANSWERED: Thanks for taking the time to explain it so clearly Jaime. I've now understood and have it working. You can see your handywork working here: www.alan<DELETETHISBIT>arnoldguitars.co.uk/guitar_repairs.htm Thanks again
    – Baz
    Aug 10 '10 at 22:18
2

To save all the extra Javascript code to get the style etc, a simple fix for this would be to add the hide CSS to the element itself.

<div class="yourclass" style="display:none;">content</div>

edit

I decided to explain my answer a little better. I'm assuming you didn't hide the div you wanted to toggle by default, so it was visible, however when calling e.style.display the result would not be none neither would it be block because the style hasn't been set yet.

Instead, you were retrieving an empty string which means the first time you clicked it, your else statement was firing; the div display was being set to none on first click, that way the next click would retrieve the value as none so of course would then change it to block.

1

more easy implémentation some how

var a=1;
function toggleDiv(xx){
  var e=document.getElementById(xx);

  if(a==1){
    e.style.display="block";a=0;
  } else {
    e.style.display="none";
  a=1;
  }

}
1

The simple answer you're looking for is to add the display:none; to the inline style. This way, when you look at

if (x.style.display == 'none')

it will return true!

0

Something like this might work for you. But put it in the head of the document. the window onload function is important because the DOM needs to be loaded before you can mess around with the input field

<input id="divOpener" rel="xx" type="button" class="button" value="click here to expand/collapse"/>

and this

window.onload = function(){
            //  get input field from html
            var myInput = document.getElementById('divOpener');
            // add onclick handler
            myInput.onclick = function(){
               // if you really need to say which div in the document body, you can
               // add it to the rel or ref etc. attributes then get the value with
               // get attribute
               var myDiv = document.getElementById(this.getAttribute('rel'));
               if(!myDiv) return;
               if(myDiv.style.display=="none"){
                  myDiv.style.display="block";
               } else {
                 myDiv.style.display="none";
               }
            }
        }
1
  • and if this doesn't work, specify what your requirements are and we can go from there... Aug 10 '10 at 21:47
0

Shog9's answer saved me from an evening's frustration. Thanks.

However there's a much simpler solution than the one he presents. The secret is simply to switch around the order of the conditional. i.e.

if(e.style.display == "block"){
    e.style.display="none"
} else {
    e.style.display="block"
}

The insight here is simply that the condition can fail for two different reasons: if the value is unobtainable it will do the right thing anyway.

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