3

I need to find complexity of this recursion using the iteration method only:

T(n) = 4T(n/2) + (n^2)*logn

I know that you can solve this using the master method and the complexity is (n^2)(logn)^2, but I tried solving it using the iteration method and I got something else:

T(n) = 4 * T(n/2) + (n^2) * log(n)
T(n/2) = 4 * T (n/4) + ((n/2)^2) * log(n/2)
T(n/4) = 4 * T(n/8) + ((n/4)^2) * log(n/4)

T(n) = 4 * (4 *  (4 * T(n/8) + (n/4)^2 * log(n/4)) + (n/2)^2 * log(n/2)) + (n^2) * log(n)

T(n) = 64T(n/8) + 16((n/4)^2) * log(n/4) + 4((n/2)^2) * log(n/2) + (n^2)log(n)

T(n) = (4^i) * T(n/(2^i)) + 4^(i-1) * (n/(2^(i-1)))^2 * log(n/(2^(i-1)))

After using i = logn I get that the algorithm has a complexity of 2^n.. which is incorrect.

7

If you will carefully unwind the recursion, you will get: enter image description here.

Now the complicated sum becomes

enter image description here

This recursion will exhaust itself when n/2^k = 1 or k = log(n). Substituting it back in the equation you get:

enter image description here, where c = T(1).

So everything is dominated by n^2 log^2(n) and this is the complexity of your recursion.

P.S. actually no need to approximate to sum, it is easy to calculate it with elementary math.

enter image description here

0

One can go further in distributing equivalent terms on both sides.

T(n)/n^2 = T(n/2)/(n/2)^2 + log(n)

was already found. Now to get a term in log(n) on the left and the same term in log(n/2)=log(n)-1 on the right, consider the squares of both, by the binomial formula

(log(n)-1)^2 = log(n)^2 - 2*log(n) + 1

so that

T(n)/n^2 - log(n)^2/2 = T(n/2)/(n/2)^2 - log(n/2)^2/2 - 1

T(n)/n^2 - log(n)^2/2 + log(n) = T(n/2)/(n/2)^2 - log(n/2)^2/2 + log(n/2)

As now equivalence of terms is reached one can conclude that the expression on the left side is constant.

T(n) = n^2 * (1/2*log(n)^2 - log(n) + C)
0

This does not form any of the three cases of Master Theorem straight away. But we can come up with an upper and lower bound based on Master Theorem.

T (n) = n^2 * log n

Maybe this will help you.

mastermethod

0
 if T(n/2) = 4T(n/(2^2)) + ((n/2)^2)*log (n/2)  ----> 1,
    T(n/4) = 4T(n/(2^3)) + ((n/4)^2)*log (n/4)  ----> 2
    and
    T(n/8) = 4T(n/(2^)4) + ((n/8)^2)*log (n/8)  ----> 3,


 T(n) = 4T(n/2) + (n^2)*log n
 T(n) = 4[4T(n/(2^2)) + ((n/2)^2)*log (n/2)] + (n^2)*log n  ----> replace 1 with T(n/2)
 T(n) = (4^2)T(n/4) + (n^2)*log (n/2) + (n^2)*log n
 T(n) = (4^2)[4T(n/(2^3)) + ((n/4)^2)*log (n/4)] + (n^2)*log (n/2) + (n^2)*log n ----> replace 2 with T(n/4)
 T(n) = (4^3)T(n/8) + (n^2)*log (n/4) + (n^2)*log (n/2) + (n^2)*log n ----> replace 3 with T(n/8)
 T(n) = (4^3)[4T(n/(2^)4) + ((n/8)^2)*log (n/8)] + (n^2)*log (n/4) + (n^2)*log (n/2) + (n^2)*log n
 T(n) = (4^4)T(n/16) + (n^2)*log (n/8) + (n^2)*log (n/4) + (n^2)*log (n/2) + (n^2)*log n

 if this goes till k,

 T(n) = (4^k)T(n/(2^k)) + (n^2) (log (n/8) + log (n/4) + log (n/2) + log n)

 if n/(2^k) = 1, n = 2^k, k = log n and T(1) = 1,

 T(n) = (n^2)T(1) + (n^2) (log ((n/(2^k)......(n/(2^3)) * (n/(2^2)) * (n/(2^1)) * n)
 T(n) = (n^2)T(1) + (n^2) (log ((n/(2^log n)......(n/(2^3)) * (n/(2^2)) * (n/(2^1)) * n)
 T(n) = (n^2) + (n^2) (log (2^logn)) (Using geometric series)
 T(n) = O(n^2 log n)

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