2

I have created a new variable, carBasket and foodBasket, and set them equal to the basketModule() function. They however are pointed to the same function when I want each of these two variables pointed to their own function. I am wondering what should I be doing to achieve this?

var basketModule = (function() {
    var basket = [];
    return {
        addItem: function(values) {
            basket.push(values);
        },
        getItemCount: function() {
            return basket.length;
        }
    };
}());

carBasket = basketModule;
carBasket.addItem('Audi');

foodBasket = basketModule;
foodBasket.addItem('Ham');

foodBasket.getItemCount(); //outputs 2 instead of 1
  • Assigning object references does not result in objects being copied. – Pointy Dec 31 '15 at 1:42
6

You must call a function for each object in order to generate different variables for each one, e.g:

var basketModule = function() {
  var basket = [];
  return {
    addItem: function(values) {
      basket.push(values);
    },
    getItemCount: function() {
      return basket.length;
    }
  };
};
var carBasket = basketModule(),
    foodBasket = basketModule();
carBasket.addItem('Audi');
foodBasket.addItem('Ham');
foodBasket.getItemCount(); // 1

However, in order to reuse the methods for all instances, better use a constructor:

var BasketModule = function() {
  this.basket = [];
};
BasketModule.prototype.addItem = function(values) {
  this.basket.push(values);
};
BasketModule.prototype.getItemCount = function() {
  return this.basket.length;
};
var carBasket = new BasketModule(),
    foodBasket = new BasketModule();
carBasket.addItem('Audi');
foodBasket.addItem('Ham');
foodBasket.getItemCount(); // 1
| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you. Are you using a prototype to conserve memory? – Jon Dec 31 '15 at 1:47
  • @Jon Yes, this way I only define the methods in the prototype only once, and all instances use those. In the first code each basket has its own copy of the methods. – Oriol Dec 31 '15 at 1:49
  • This works. But I was wondering though, isn't it a better practice to create an object with a constructor and properties instead of the function in the first place? – el3ati2 Dec 31 '15 at 1:50
  • 2
    @el3ati2 The first code (function) is the working code closest to OP's one. The second code (constructor) is how I would recommend to do it. – Oriol Dec 31 '15 at 1:53
  • 1
    You updated your answer as I was writing my comment :) – el3ati2 Dec 31 '15 at 1:55
1

You should consider trying this pattern instead:

var BasketModule = function() {
    var basket = [];
    return {
        addItem: function(values) {
            basket.push(values);
        },
        getItemCount: function() {
            return basket.length;
        }
    };
};

carBasket = new BasketModule();
carBasket.addItem('Audi');

foodBasket = new BasketModule();
foodBasket.addItem('Ham');

jsfiddle: https://jsfiddle.net/nvsbjset/

This will create separate objects for each basket

| improve this answer | |

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