13

I am new to RxJS and I am trying to write an app that will accomplish the following things:

  1. On load, make an AJAX request (faked as fetchItems() for simplicity) to fetch a list of items.
  2. Every second after that, make an AJAX request to get the items.
  3. When checking for new items, ONLY items changed after the most recent timestamp should be returned.
  4. There shouldn't be any state external to the observables.

My first attempt was very straight forward and met goals 1, 2 and 4.

var data$ = Rx.Observable.interval(1000)
  .startWith('run right away')
  .map(function() { 
    // `fetchItems(modifiedSince)` returns an array of items modified after `modifiedSince`, but
    // I am not yet tracking the `modifiedSince` timestamp yet so all items will always be returned
    return fetchItems(); 
  });

Now I'm excited, that was easy, it can't be that much harder to meet goal 3...several hours later this is where I am at:

var modifiedSince = null;
var data$ = Rx.Observable.interval(1000)
  .startWith('run right away')
  .flatMap(function() { 
    // `fetchItems(modifiedSince)` returns an array of items modified after `modifiedSince`
    return fetchItems(modifiedSince);
  })
  .do(function(item) {
    if(item.updatedAt > modifiedSince) {
      modifiedSince = item.updatedAt;
    }
  })
  .scan(function(previous, current) {
    previous.push(current);
    return previous;
  }, []);

This solves goal 3, but regresses on goal 4. I am now storing state outside of the observable.

I'm assuming that global modifiedSince and the .do() block aren't the best way of accomplishing this. Any guidance would be greatly appreciated.

EDIT: hopefully clarified what I am looking for with this question.

2
  • how do you know an item has changed and what time the last change occured? This is about state management, if you define well your state, the scan operator should help to carry that state along the lifetime of your observable. Dec 31 '15 at 11:37
  • @user3743222 I have updated the question to clarify. I need to get the max updatedAt from fetchItems(modifiedSince) and feed that value into fetchItems the next time it is called.
    – user774031
    Dec 31 '15 at 19:37
3

Here is another solution which does not use closure or 'external state'.

I made the following hypothesis :

  • fetchItems returns a Rx.Observable of items, i.e. not an array of items

It makes use of the expand operator which allows to emit values which follow a recursive relationship of the type x_n+1 = f(x_n). You pass x_n+1 by returning an observable which emits that value, for instance Rx.Observable.return(x_n+1) and you can finish the recursion by returning Rx.Observable.empty(). Here it seems that you don't have an ending condition so this will run forever.

scan also allows to emit values following a recursive relationship (x_n+1 = f(x_n, y_n)). The difference is that scan forces you to use a syncronous function (so x_n+1 is synchronized with y_n), while with expand you can use an asynchronous function in the form of an observable.

Code is not tested, so keep me updated if this works or not.

Relevant documentation : expand, combineLatest

var modifiedSinceInitValue = // put your date here
var polling_frequency = // put your value here
var initial_state = {modifiedSince: modifiedSinceInitValue, itemArray : []}
function max(property) {
  return function (acc, current) {
    acc = current[property] > acc ? current[property] : acc;
  }
}    
var data$ = Rx.Observable.return(initial_state)
  .expand (function(state){
             return fetchItem(state.modifiedSince)
                   .toArray()
                   .combineLatest(Rx.Observable.interval(polling_frequency).take(1), 
                     function (itemArray, _) {
                       return {
                         modifiedSince : itemArray.reduce(max('updatedAt'), modifiedSinceInitValue), 
                         itemArray : itemArray
                       }
                     }

  })
1
  • With some minor syntax tweaking that does exactly what I am looking for. Thanks a lot for all your help on this.
    – user774031
    Jan 1 '16 at 19:34
1

You seem to mean that modifiedSince is part of the state you carry, so it should appear in the scan. Why don-t you move the action in do into the scan too?. Your seed would then be {modifiedSince: null, itemArray: []}.

Errr, I just thought that this might not work, as you need to feed modifiedSince back to the fetchItem function which is upstream. Don't you have a cycle here? That means you would have to use a subject to break that cycle. Alternatively you can try to keep modifiedSince encapsulated in a closure. Something like

function pollItems (fetchItems, polling_frequency) {
var modifiedSince = null;
var data$ = Rx.Observable.interval(polling_frequency)
  .startWith('run right away')
  .flatMap(function() { 
    // `fetchItems(modifiedSince)` returns an array of items modified after `modifiedSince`
    return fetchItems(modifiedSince);
  })
  .do(function(item) {
    if(item.updatedAt > modifiedSince) {
      modifiedSince = item.updatedAt;
    }
  })
  .scan(function(previous, current) {
    previous.push(current);
    return previous;
  }, []);

return data$;
}

I have to run out to celebrate the new year, if that does not work, I can give another try later (maybe using the expand operator, the other version of scan).

2
  • Yes it could be done in a closure, this is more of an exercise in learning RxJS. I was hoping it could be done without storing external state.
    – user774031
    Dec 31 '15 at 20:14
  • external state is not a crime. If you look at the implementation of the RxJS operators, for example the one for scan, it should be keeping hold of the accumulator in a closure too. Same as using subjects is not a crime either. But you do have to make sure that you defend against the pitfalls. But I'll try anyways to get something stateless tomorrow. Dec 31 '15 at 20:25
1

How about this:

var interval = 1000;
function fetchItems() {
    return items;
}

var data$ = Rx.Observable.interval(interval)
  .map(function() { return fetchItems(); })
  .filter(function(x) {return x.lastModified > Date.now() - interval}
  .skip(1)
  .startWith(fetchItems());

That should filter the source only for new items, plus start you off with the full collection. Just write the filter function to be appropriate for your data source.

Or by passing an argument to fetchItems:

var interval = 1000;
function fetchItems(modifiedSince) {
    var retVal = modifiedSince ? items.filter( function(x) {return x.lastModified > modifiedSince}) : items
    return retVal;
}

var data$ = Rx.Observable.interval(interval)
  .map(function() { return fetchItems(Date.now() - interval); })
  .skip(1)
  .startWith(fetchItems());
2
  • This doesn't solve my problem of passing a modifiedSince parameter into fetchItems. I have updated the question to clarify this.
    – user774031
    Dec 31 '15 at 19:52
  • Each item should have it's lastModified prop set when you modify it. Your fetchItems function should return all the items. Then on the initial load, you accept them all. After that, you only accept the ones that have been modified. You can also add it as an argument to fetchItems, if you only want to retrieve new ones. Jan 1 '16 at 11:09

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