4

TL;DR:

I was looking for a concise example of Qt threading, and all I found was complex "eye-candy" that claimed to show how QThreads work, but they were simply too much to figure out.

I accepted Zen's answer because he showed me the exact thing that my attempts were missing, then added my own to be the example that I wanted to see. Click here to skip to it: https://stackoverflow.com/a/34561122/3491308

My original question is as follows:


It seems I must be missing something, but I just can't seem to make this work like I think it ought to. My complete application needs to have two or three threads, all of which start (almost) together and run forever:

  • The GUI
    • Loads a bunch of objects from files before starting the other two threads to process them.
  • A realtime processor
    • Has TimeCriticalPriority and a periodic QTimer "interrupt" in an attempt to use a PC as a much more powerful embedded system than what I started with. This project started as entirely embedded and quickly became too involved to manage there.
  • A USB HID driver
    • Connects to the part of the project that is still embedded.

The core functionality, of course, is in the realtime processing thread, and the other two are simply to adjust how it works. So there are processing objects being created, modified, and destroyed while the realtime processor is running, based on the user's actions in the GUI, and the data inside some of those objects is being produced and consumed by USB also.

I keep looking for examples of how to use threads in Qt, but I keep getting complex "eye candy"-type applications that clutter up the threading part. I do my best to try and interpret them and write my own, but I keep getting segfaults in Qt itself and my small "playground" project says that I'm not even getting a second thread:

#ifndef MAIN_H
#define MAIN_H

#include <QtWidgets>

class MainWindow : public QMainWindow
{
    Q_OBJECT
public:
    MainWindow(QWidget* parent = 0);
    ~MainWindow() {}
private:
    QObject* mythingy;
private slots:
    void deleteObject(QObject* thingy);
};

class Worker : public QObject
{
    Q_OBJECT
public:
    Worker(QObject* thingy, QObject* parent = 0);
private:
    QObject* mythingy;
signals:
    void deleteObject(QObject* thingy);
private slots:
    void doWork();
};

#endif // MAIN_H

/***************
*** main.cpp ***
***************/
#include "main.h"
#include <QApplication>

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    QApplication a(argc, argv);
    MainWindow w;
    w.show();
    return a.exec();
}



MainWindow::MainWindow(QWidget* parent)
    : QMainWindow(parent)
{
    mythingy = new QObject(this);
    QThread* thisthread = this->thread();
    QThread* mainthread = QCoreApplication::instance()->thread();
    //breakpoint here to check thisthread and mainthread
    Worker* worker = new Worker(mythingy, this);
    connect(worker, SIGNAL(deleteObject(QObject*)), this, SLOT(deleteObject(QObject*)));
}

void MainWindow::deleteObject(QObject* thingy)
{
    QThread* thisthread = this->thread();
    QThread* mainthread = QCoreApplication::instance()->thread();
    //breakpoint here to check thisthread and mainthread
    delete thingy;
}



Worker::Worker(QObject* thingy, QObject* parent)
    : QObject(parent)
{
    mythingy = thingy;
    QThread* thread = new QThread(this);
    this->moveToThread(thread);

    //use a timer to allow the constructor to exit
    QTimer* timer = new QTimer(this);
    timer->setSingleShot(true);
    timer->start(1000);
    connect(timer, SIGNAL(timeout()), this, SLOT(doWork()));

    QThread* thisthread = this->thread();
    QThread* mainthread = QCoreApplication::instance()->thread();
    //breakpoint here to check thisthread and mainthread
    thread->start();
}

void Worker::doWork()
{
    QThread* thisthread = this->thread();
    QThread* mainthread = QCoreApplication::instance()->thread();
    //breakpoint here to check thisthread and mainthread
    deleteObject(mythingy);
}

If someone can post an example of how to do QThreads right, given my description of the project, and with as little clutter as possible (preferably shorter than mine if possible), I'd greatly appreciate it.


Edit:

Based on Zen's answer, this seems to work too:

MainWindow::MainWindow(QWidget* parent)
    : QMainWindow(parent)
{
    mythingy = new QObject(this);
    QThread* thisthread = this->thread();
    QThread* mainthread = QCoreApplication::instance()->thread();
    Worker* worker = new Worker(mythingy, this);
}

Worker::Worker(QObject* thingy, QObject* parent)
    : QObject(0)    //no real parent, so we can move to a different thread
{
    mythingy = thingy;

    QTimer* timer = new QTimer(this);
    timer->setSingleShot(true);
    timer->start(1000);
    connect(timer, SIGNAL(timeout()), this, SLOT(doWork()));

    QThread* thread = new QThread(parent);
    this->moveToThread(thread);
    thread->start();
}

void Worker::doWork()
{
    QThread* thisthread = this->thread();
    QThread* mainthread = QCoreApplication::instance()->thread();
    delete mythingy;
}

Still moving myself inside the constructor, and now deleting the object directly instead of telling the owner's thread to do it. (remember in the full project that the owner has already marked the object for deletion but refrained from actually doing so because the other thread might be using it)

Anything wrong with that?

2 Answers 2

2

Here's the concise example that I was looking for, with Zen's help. It fits nicely (on my screen at least) if you scroll it all the way down. The header file on top is simply to make it compile.

#ifndef MAIN_H
#define MAIN_H

#include <QtWidgets>

class Worker : public QObject
{
    Q_OBJECT
public:
    Worker(QObject* thingy, QObject* parent = 0);
private:
    QObject* mythingy;
private slots:
    void doWork();
};

class MainWindow : public QMainWindow
{
    Q_OBJECT
public:
    MainWindow(QWidget* parent = 0);
    ~MainWindow();
private:
    QObject* mythingy;
    Worker* myworker;
};

#endif // MAIN_H

/***************
*** main.cpp ***
***************/
#include "main.h"
#include <QApplication>

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    QApplication a(argc, argv);
    MainWindow w;
    w.show();
    return a.exec();
}

MainWindow::MainWindow(QWidget* parent)
    : QMainWindow(parent)
{
    mythingy = new QObject(this);
    myworker = new Worker(mythingy, this);
}

MainWindow::~MainWindow()
{
    delete myworker;
}

Worker::Worker(QObject* thingy, QObject* parent)
    : QObject(0)    //no real parent, so we can move to a different thread
{
    mythingy = thingy;

    //move myself to a new thread and start it
    QThread* thread = new QThread(parent);
    connect(thread, SIGNAL(started()), this, SLOT(doWork()));
    this->moveToThread(thread);
    thread->start();
}

void Worker::doWork()
{
    //deleting an object from a different thread:
    //requires careful planning to make it safe, but seems to work as expected
    delete mythingy;
}

The comments point out the important parts, and the rest is, again, simply there to make it run at all. You can add this to doWork() to verify that it is a different thread:

QThread* thisthread = this->thread();
QThread* mainthread = QCoreApplication::instance()->thread();

Set a breakpoint immediately after that and see that the pointers are different.


As for the segfaults, the threading-based ones seemed to go away when I got it right, leaving only the naively-written, non-thread-safe code to delete things prematurely.

1

1.you cannot move objects with a parent. So instead Worker* worker = new Worker(mythingy, this);, you should use Worker* worker = new Worker(mythingy);
2.you cannot create children for a parent that is in a different thread.

MainWindow::MainWindow(QWidget* parent)
    : QMainWindow(parent)
{
    mythingy = new QObject(this);
    QThread* thisthread = this->thread();
    QThread* mainthread = QCoreApplication::instance()->thread();
    //breakpoint here to check thisthread and mainthread
    //*****************
    Worker* worker = new Worker(mythingy);
    QThread* thread = new QThread();
    worker->moveToThread(thread);
    thread->start();
    //*****************
    connect(worker, SIGNAL(deleteObject(QObject*)), this, SLOT(deleteObject(QObject*)));
}

Worker::Worker(QObject* thingy, QObject* parent)
    : QObject(parent)
{
    mythingy = thingy;
//    QThread* thread = new QThread(this);
//    this->moveToThread(thread);

    //use a timer to allow the constructor to exit
    QTimer* timer = new QTimer(this);
    timer->setSingleShot(true);
    timer->start(1000);
    connect(timer, SIGNAL(timeout()), this, SLOT(doWork()));

//    QThread* thisthread = this->thread();
//    QThread* mainthread = QCoreApplication::instance()->thread();
    //breakpoint here to check thisthread and mainthread
//    thread->start();
}

The slots of an object is always executed by the thread it lives in. So, since you have never move MainWindow, there is no need to check its thread in MainWindow::deleteObject. For example:

Worker* worker = new Worker(mythingy);
QThread* thread = new QThread();
worker->moveToThread(thread);
thread->start();

//wrong: directly invoking doWork in mainthread    
worker->doWork();

//correct: through signal-slot mechanics
connect(this, SIGNAL(startWork()), worker, SLOT(doWork()));
5
  • Aha! I got hung up on the parent. Do you see anything wrong with my updated code?
    – AaronD
    Jan 1, 2016 at 7:14
  • you can use connect(worker, SIGNAL(deleteObject()), worker, SLOT(deleteLater());
    – Zen
    Jan 1, 2016 at 7:22
  • I'm not sure I follow that. Doesn't deleteLater() destroy the entire thread as soon as its event queue is empty and the functions have finished? This example shows a one-off event, but my full application has a constant stream of data that needs processing.
    – AaronD
    Jan 1, 2016 at 7:35
  • Destroying an QObject (worker) of a QThread (thread) will not destroy the thread even it has an empty event queue.
    – Zen
    Jan 1, 2016 at 7:54
  • Okay, so I can then move a different object into that thread and reuse it. Useful in general, but not for my project, where two or three threads are started once and run forever. If deleteLater() had an argument to make it work on something other than "this", I might see its immediate usefulness, but it doesn't. Because of how I've structured things in the main project, I think I can handle a direct delete in this specific case. Definitely not something you'd want to toss around lightly though.
    – AaronD
    Jan 1, 2016 at 19:21

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