448

Is there any linux command that I can call from a Bash script that will print the directory structure in the form of a tree, e.g.,

folder1
   a.txt
   b.txt
folder2
   folder3

closed as off topic by Jens Erat, JJJ, dkinzer, Luc M, Joseph Mastey May 11 '13 at 22:42

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  • 7
    Just run find. Or find . -not -path '*/\.*' to hide files and folders starting with .. If you want to have output with spaces, as in the question, use it with this "find prettifier" script: find . -not -path '*/\.*' | python -c "import sys as s;s.a=[];[setattr(s,'a',list(filter(lambda p: c.startswith(p+'/'),s.a)))or (s.stdout.write(' '*len(s.a)+c[len(s.a[-1])+1 if s.a else 0:])or True) and s.a.append(c[:-1]) for c in s.stdin]" – user Jun 14 '14 at 0:49
  • 9
    Shouldn't such questions get migrated to SuperUser rather than closed ? – Balmipour Oct 10 '15 at 10:34
  • 10
    i dont think this question deserves to be closed as "off topic". The tags seem to be right. – Sanket Berde Dec 1 '15 at 8:27
  • 12
    The policy of closing questions without migrating is harmful to both stackoverflow and human knowledge in general. In the last 3 days, every single questions I googled and came across was closed for similar reasoning, and no more activity was able to happen. This means no one can update it, no one can give a better answer, and it makes stackoverflow look shortsighted or elitist. Stackoverflow should consider requiring a migration when a topic is found to have these conditions. – Nay Nov 27 '16 at 19:32
  • 5
    I agree with @NickYeates I am here in late September of 2017 still finding answers to this same question. Think long term when we design these question and answer policies! – Alex Sep 28 '17 at 20:38
702

is this what your looking for tree, should be in most distributions (maybe as an optional install)?

~> tree -d /proc/self/
/proc/self/
|-- attr
|-- cwd -> /proc
|-- fd
|   `-- 3 -> /proc/15589/fd
|-- fdinfo
|-- net
|   |-- dev_snmp6
|   |-- netfilter
|   |-- rpc
|   |   |-- auth.rpcsec.context
|   |   |-- auth.rpcsec.init
|   |   |-- auth.unix.gid
|   |   |-- auth.unix.ip
|   |   |-- nfs4.idtoname
|   |   |-- nfs4.nametoid
|   |   |-- nfsd.export
|   |   `-- nfsd.fh
|   `-- stat
|-- root -> /
`-- task
    `-- 15589
        |-- attr
        |-- cwd -> /proc
        |-- fd
        | `-- 3 -> /proc/15589/task/15589/fd
        |-- fdinfo
        `-- root -> /

27 directories

sample taken from maintainers web page.

You can add the option -L # where # is replaced by a number, to specify the max recursivity level.

Remove -d to display also files.

  • 47
    Note for any visitor seeing this: remove -d to display files also! – soc1c May 11 '13 at 8:49
  • 28
    Note for any visitor seeing this: The man page lists a truckload of more flags for you :) – oivvio Apr 26 '14 at 18:52
  • 5
    You can install this on Mac OS X with Homebrew as well! – Mark Nov 5 '14 at 3:07
  • 34
    To install on Mac OS X w/Homebrew: brew install tree – funfuntime Dec 23 '14 at 8:48
  • 1
    To install on cygwin apt-cyg install tree (assuming you've installed apt-cyg) – blockloop Feb 19 '15 at 19:36
288

You can use this one:

ls -R | grep ":$" | sed -e 's/:$//' -e 's/[^-][^\/]*\//--/g' -e 's/^/   /' -e 's/-/|/'

It will show a graphical representation of the current sub-directories without files in a few seconds, e.g. in /var/cache/:

   .
   |-apache2
   |---mod_cache_disk
   |-apparmor
   |-apt
   |---archives
   |-----partial
   |-apt-xapian-index
   |---index.1
   |-dbconfig-common
   |---backups
   |-debconf

Source

  • 7
    If you want it with spaces, more like the OP requested, then this: ls -R | grep ":$" | sed -e 's/:$//' -e 's/[^-][^\/]*\// /g' -e 's/^/ /' – Ben Oct 4 '13 at 0:56
  • any way I can make this ignore dotfiles? E.g. prevent it from listing the contents of .git? – GMA Apr 25 '14 at 6:31
  • @GeorgeMillo see my comment – user Jun 14 '14 at 0:55
  • 29
    Doesn't print files. – Tomáš Zato Apr 21 '15 at 20:57
  • 21
    with files: find . | sed -e "s/[^-][^\/]*\// |/g" -e "s/|\([^ ]\)/|-\1/" – user648026 Jun 29 '18 at 19:31
14

To add Hassou's solution to your .bashrc, try:

alias lst='ls -R | grep ":$" | sed -e '"'"'s/:$//'"'"' -e '"'"'s/[^-][^\/]*\//--/g'"'"' -e '"'"'s/^/   /'"'"' -e '"'"'s/-/|/'"'"
  • 6
    Beware of the newline character at the end of the first line if copying this directly – Rahul Aug 5 '16 at 16:46
  • 1
    Nice alias. But there is missing ' ' (2 single quote chars) at the end. It works even without it, but... if you want to add some more commands at the end you will see the literal is not complete. So it should go alias lst='ls -R | grep ":$" | sed -e '"'"'s/:$//'"'"' -e '"'"'s/[^-][^\/]*\//--/g'"'"' -e '"'"'s/^/ /'"'"' -e '"'"'s/-/|/'"'"'' – Hero Qu Feb 15 at 19:00

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