12

JavaScript's forEach documentation states that the .forEach syntax is:

arr.forEach(callback[, thisArg])

What is the usage of thisArg?

7
  • As the docs say Optional. Value to use as this when executing callback. - if (arguments.length > 1) {T = thisArg;}
    – takendarkk
    Jan 1, 2016 at 13:37
  • 4
    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's asking to explain what's already well documented. Jan 1, 2016 at 13:41
  • 6
    @LoïcFaure-Lacroix What are you talking about? I ask an example of documentation, which is not clear for me Jan 1, 2016 at 13:42
  • 1
    A search for those keywords gives you a lot of examples
    – Bergi
    Jan 1, 2016 at 14:10
  • 1
    Notice of meta discussion on this question Jan 1, 2016 at 16:24

5 Answers 5

16

thisArg refers to context which callback should be called, basically it is what this refers to inside callback. For example:

var myObject = { name: 'myObject' };

[1,2].forEach(function(item) { 
 console.log(item); // 1, 2
 console.log(this === myObject); // true
}, myObject)
16

The thisArg can be provided to change the inner this of the callback function. See below.


If you were confused by the fact, that thisArg does nothing when using an arrow function:

var myObject = { name: 'myObject' };

[1,2].forEach(item => { 
  console.log(item);                     // 1, 2
  console.log(this === myObject, this);  // false  Window {}
}, myObject)

It's because

arrow functions cannot be bound



Context binding with normal function.

var myObject = { name: 'myObject' };

[1,2].forEach(function(item){ 
  console.log(item);                     // 1, 2
  console.log(this === myObject, this);  // true  {name: "myObject"}
}, myObject)

If you don't specify myObject at this point, the this inside would point to Window as with the arrow function.

1
  • Thanks, I was having trouble with this. Jan 17 at 20:24
4

A this value is a special object which is related with the execution context.

An object in which context the execution context is activated

The value of this is determinate only once when entering the context And it is not possible to assign a new value to this

in your case, providing thisArg is like

arr.forEach(callback.bind(thisArg));

forEach, simplified it for you, asking a seperate optional param

Now, if you run this forEach with out this

arr.forEach(function(item) {
    console.log(this === window); //true
    console.log(this === arr);    //false
});

you get the point!

1
  • 2
    Small note: if you don't specify it, this will become the global object only in non-strict mode, in strict mode it would be undefined. And this == arr could be true if arr is the global object and it inherits from Array.prototype and mode is not strict.
    – Oriol
    Jan 3, 2016 at 23:26
2

I think these tests will make whole thing clear just test in your browser console

arr=[0];

arr.forEach(function(item) {
    console.log(this === window); //true
    console.log(this === arr);    //false
});

arr.forEach(function(item) {
    console.log(this === window); //true
    console.log(this === arr);    //false
},this);

arr.forEach(function(item) {
    console.log(this === window); //false
    console.log(this === arr);    //true
},arr);

arr.forEach(function(item) {
    console.log(this === window); //false
    console.log(this === arr);    //false
},0);
0

I use this often in the context of prototypes and functions:

var MyClass = function() {
  this.GlobalVar = 3;
}

MyClass.prototype.func1 = function(a) {
  return (a == this.GlobalVar);
}

MyClass.prototype.func2 = function(arr) {
  arr.forEach(function(item) {
    console.log(this.func1(item));
  }, this); // use of thisArg
}

MyClass.prototype.func3 = function(arr) {
  var that = this;
  arr.forEach(function(item) {
    console.log(that.func1(item));
  }); // also possible without using thisArg
}

MyClass.prototype.func4 = function(arr) {
  arr.forEach(function(item) {
    console.log(this.func1(item));
  }); // implementation raising an error, because this.func1 does not exist in that context
}

var arr = [0, 1, 3, 4, 3, 1];
var myClass = new MyClass();
myClass.func2(arr);
/* prints:
false
false
true
false
true
false
*/
myClass.func3(arr) /* same as func2 */
myClass.func4(arr); /* Fails with
Error: {
  "message": "TypeError: this.func1 is not a function",
  "filename": "https://stacksnippets.net/js",
  "lineno": 35,
  "colno": 26
}
*/

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