1

start with number 1 how to add that same number and a space in front of every line in one paragraph, same for number 2 and the next paragraph. Paragraphs are separated by a blank line, about 50 paragraphs in the text file, each paragraph has 2 to 30 lines.

some text here
more numbers and text

more text here
and here is more text
number text

1 some text here
1 more numbers and text

2 more text here
2 and here is more text
2 number text

1
  • Did you try this yourself? What problem are you having? Jan 1, 2016 at 16:24

4 Answers 4

5

The trick here is to view the paragraphs as records, and the lines as fields.

awk 'BEGIN { RS="\n\n"; FS="\n" }
     { for (i = 1; i <= NF; i++)
         print FNR, $i;
       print "" }' < in > out

Happy New Year!

4
  • 2
    I would use RS="" so that any number of blank lines separates records. Jan 1, 2016 at 22:05
  • @glennjackman Good one; I was thinking of \n+ myself: match one or more newlines. I'm surprised that an empty string does the same thing; looks like a quirk to me!
    – Kaz
    Jan 2, 2016 at 2:32
  • 1
    It's a feature of "standard" awk: gnu.org/software/gawk/manual/html_node/awk-split-records.html Jan 2, 2016 at 3:50
  • Not only is RS="" the standard feature to use for "paragraph mode" but use of RS="\n\n" makes your script unnecessarily gawk-specific since, per POSIX, awk is only required to support single-character RS values and any character after the first can just be dropped. gawk is one of the few (the only?) awks that support multi-char RS. This IS the right awk approach though so +1!
    – Ed Morton
    Jan 2, 2016 at 5:05
5

another awk alternative, counts the empty lines, without loops.

$ awk '/^$/{c++;print;next} {print c+1, $0}' text  

1 some text here
1 more numbers and text

2 more text here
2 and here is more text
2 number text

this preserves number of empty lines

$ awk '/^$/{e=1;print;next} e{c++} {print c+1,$0;e=0}' text2

1 some text here
1 more numbers and text 


2 more text here
2 and here is more text
2 number text
0
1

This will allow for multiple blanks between paragraphs, or even preceding your first paragraph. Of course, your data will never be like that, and it will never be important for the paragraph-numbers to actually be correct. However, just in case it is so for someone else.

BEGIN {
    ParaNum = 1
    MultiBlankRecNum = 0
    }
{
if ( NF == 0 ) {
    if ( NR > ( MultiBlankRecNum + 1 ) ) {
        ++ParaNum
        }
    print
    MultiBlankRecNum = NR
    next
    }
print ParaNum, $0 
}

For a bit more fun, this prefixes the paragraph, line within paragraph, then the text line within the file, and the record-number within the file, running count of words and words on the line.

BEGIN {
    ParaNum = 1
    TextLineInFile = 0
    TextLineInPara = 0
    MultiBlankRecNum = 0
    WordsRunningTotal = 0
    }
{
if ( NF == 0 ) {
    if ( NR > ( MultiBlankRecNum + 1 ) ) {
        ++ParaNum
        }
    print $0
    MultiBlankRecNum = NR
    TextLineInPara = 0
    next
    }

++TextLineInPara 
++TextLineInFile
print ParaNum "." TextLineInPara, TextLineInFile "/" FNR, NF "/" WordsRunningTotal, $0 
WordsRunningTotal += NF
}
0

The perl solution is very compact:

perl -00 -lpe 's/^/$. /mg' file
  • -00 reads the file in paragraph mode.
  • $. is the current record number
  • the m flag of the s/// command enables "multi-line" mode, so ^ matches at the start of each line of the string.

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