3

The title say it all. I've found some answers(about callback and something else) but I don't know how to apply it to my code.

Question : how to wait for $( "#layout-grid" ).load(layout); finished before executing next line ?

The alert at the last line won't show up on the first execution because $( "#layout-grid" ).load(layout); is not finished loading yet. However, the alert shows correctly on the second execution.

function setLayout(selectedLayout) {
    layout += selectedLayout;
    $( "#layout-grid" ).load(layout); // this load is not finished yet before alert
    var top_level_div = document.getElementById('layout');
    var count = top_level_div.getElementsByTagName('div').length;
    alert(count);
}

4 Answers 4

6

You can pass the .load() call a second argument, which is a callback that will fire when it is done. See here:

function setLayout(selectedLayout) {
    layout += selectedLayout;
    $( "#layout-grid" ).load(layout, function(){
        var top_level_div = document.getElementById('layout');
        var count = top_level_div.getElementsByTagName('div').length;
        alert(count);
    }); 
}

Hope this helps.

5

$.load() takes an optional callback argument. You have to put the code that needs to be executed after loading is done in a function, and pass that function to $.load.

Your example would look like that:

function setLayout(selectedLayout) {
    layout += selectedLayout;
    $( "#layout-grid" ).load(layout, function afterLoad() {
        var top_level_div = document.getElementById('layout');
        var count = top_level_div.getElementsByTagName('div').length;
        alert(count);
    }); 
}
2

Unfortunately there is no way in Javascript to transform an asynchronous request into a synchronous one because, for some reasons unclear to me, it was decided that nesting event loops was not going to be possible in Javascript.

For example it is impossible to write something like alert(msg) in Javascript and it's this way because this limitation was put in deliberately.

The "workaround" is to use callbacks... i.e. instead of waiting you need to tell what to do (in another function) when the event you'd wait for will happen, if it will happen.

There is StratifiedJs that allows "waiting" for asynchronous events hiding the complexity of callback-based control flow unless you really want it, but it's a compiler that accepts as input a superset of Javascript and generates Javascript.

1

you must be use call back function in jquery for sample your code must be write like this

function setLayout(selectedLayout) {
layout += selectedLayout;
$( "#layout-grid" ).load(layout,function(){
      var top_level_div = document.getElementById('layout');
var count = top_level_div.getElementsByTagName('div').length;
alert(count);
});

for detail read this link

good luck

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