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I came across the code snippet in Mastering Object-oriented Python.

I don't understand the syntax of line 2. I understand that rank_str is a dictionary. What is the class_, syntax and what is it doing?

The other part I don't understand is on line 8. If class_ is a class then why is suit needed in the constructor when it is never referred to? Is it because the *Card classes have it as a parameter in their constructors?

1. def card( rank, suit ):
2.    class_, rank_str= {
3.        1:  (AceCard,'A'),
4.        11: (FaceCard,'J'),
5.        12: (FaceCard,'Q'),
6.        13: (FaceCard,'K'),
7.        }.get(rank, (NumberCard, str(rank)))
8.    return class_( rank_str, suit )
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  • Have you read the documentation for the dict.get() method?
    – martineau
    Jan 1, 2016 at 22:57

2 Answers 2

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There is no special syntax. class_ is just a variable. It will wind up referring to one of the classes AceCard, FaceCard, or NumberCard because of the call to the dict's get method. So class_(rank_str, suit) is just like calling AceCard(rank_str, suit), or FaceCard(rank_str, suit) or NumberCard(rank_str, suit) (depending on which class is chosen for the given input).

The assingment on line 2 is just like a, b = 1, 2. It is assigning two variables in one assignment. (The two values are taken from the dict. You can see that every value in the dict is a tuple of two elements.)

If class_ is a class then why is suit needed in the constructor when it is never referred to? Is it because the *Card classes have it as a parameter in their constructors?

Yes.

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2

The values in the unnamed dictionary are all tuples of two values. If rank matches one of the keys in it, the variables class_ and rank_str will each be assigned the corresponding tuple value. If not, then they will be assigned the NumberCard class and str(rank) — so those are the defaults.

Lastly, thecard() function then returns the result of calling the class assigned to the class_ variable and passing it the current values of rank_str and suit as arguments.

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