1

I've been playing around with display:flex lately as I see it becoming more trending. In a quick test, using flex and non-flex CSS approaches, I realized, my widths, and margins are always respected when using flex. Is this a good approach considering that I will most likely need a gutter between elements anyway? Moreover, where is the margin between spans coming from? This is what I mean:

HTML

<div class="container">
  <div class="box">
    <span class="inner-box">This gives me a 30px X 60px</span>
    <span class="inner-box">This gives me a 30px X 60px</span>
    <span class="inner-box">This gives me a 30px X 60px</span>
  </div>  
  <div class="box2">
    <span class="inner-box">This gives me a width larger than the specified 30px</span>
    <span class="inner-box">This gives me a width larger than the specified 30px</span>
    <span class="inner-box">This gives me a width larger than the specified 30px</span>
  </div>  
</div>

CSS

.box{
  background: orange;
  display:flex;
  flex-direction:row-reverse;
  padding:0 10px;
}

.box2{
  background: green;
  text-align:right;
  padding:0 10px;
}

.inner-box{
  width:30px;
  background:#fff;
  margin:0 0px;
}

Notice the widths at runtime Flexbox

Non-flexbox

DEMO

  • 2
    What is the question exactly? If display:flex honors width, where display:inline doesn't? If so, the answer is yes, but that wasn't very clear. – Mr Lister Jan 2 '16 at 15:36
  • @MrLister, you are right, I missed to add the main question I have about this. I was in a rush when I had to post this. I edited – LOTUSMS Jan 2 '16 at 19:05
  • In your pen you have .box2 span { display: inline-block }, and the space between them is explained in How to remove the space between inline-block elements?. In your question you don't have that, so they have the default display: inline, so they ignore width as explained in Setting the width of inline elements. Your question is a dupe of one of these. – Oriol Jan 3 '16 at 20:58
  • No dupe. But you can dupe it if you want. It's ok – LOTUSMS Jan 3 '16 at 21:00
4

You are using <span> elements. They are inline by default. The width is automatically ignored for inline elements.

In the first div section (.box), however, the span's inline display value is overridden by the parent's display: flex, which establishes a flex formatting context. Hence, all children become flex items, which respect width and height.

Flex Items

A flex item establishes a new formatting context for its contents. The type of this formatting context is determined by its display value, as usual. However, flex items themselves are flex-level boxes, not block-level boxes: they participate in their container’s flex formatting context, not in a block formatting context.

source: https://drafts.csswg.org/css-flexbox-1/#flex-items


In the second div section (.box2), the span elements remain display: inline, as they are not removed from the block-formatting context, and any width and height assignments are ignored.

Try display: inline-block: http://codepen.io/anon/pen/yeggOy

References:

  • This is a great and detail answer. I was looking for something like this to clarify the differences but to be the devil's advocate here. I tried display:inline-block and although it respected the width, it overflowed the text and still added the margins, unlike display flex – LOTUSMS Jan 2 '16 at 18:59
  • The whitespace you're seeing is a natural feature of inline-block elements. Here's the explanation. Using one (of several) methods for removing the whitespace, here's your revised demo. – Michael_B Jan 2 '16 at 19:06
  • 1
    font-size:0 !!!!! Who would've thought the font would have anything to do with this? Now, that, is a very interesting concept! – LOTUSMS Jan 2 '16 at 19:10
2

Your question is a little unclear but if, as MrLister commented:

If display:flex honors width, where display:inline doesn't? If so, the answer is yes,.

This is because, per the spec,

Flex items paint exactly the same as inline blocks

and so are affected by width statements.

  • The cool thing about your link reference (aside from the inline-block comparison) is that it highlights something probably not commonly known: flex items can use z-order without being positioned. – Michael_B Jan 2 '16 at 16:35
  • This interesting. Considering z-ordering can be a rescue sometimes but positioning can lead to more adjustments – LOTUSMS Jan 2 '16 at 19:01
  • I was in a rush when I posted, so I edited the question. But mainly my question is regarding to how are the widths handled and more importantly, where is the margin coming from? – LOTUSMS Jan 2 '16 at 19:06

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