0

I have been reading the first chapter of K&R, but I am having trouble with one of the very first problems.

#include <stdio.h>

/* count digits, white space, others */

main(){

        int c, i, nwhite, nother;
        int ndigit[10];

        nwhite = nother = 0;
        for (i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
                ndigit[i] = 0;

        while ((c = getchar()) != EOF)
                if(c >= '0' && c <= '9')
                        ++ndigit[c-'0'];
                else if(c == ' ' || c == '\n' || c == '\t')
                        ++nwhite;
                else
                        ++nother;
        printf("digits =");
        for (i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
                printf(" %d", ndigit[i]);
        printf(", white space = %d, other = %d\n",
                nwhite, nother);

}

I have zero output in the terminal from this. I have tried many different variations of this, but can not seem to get it to output and numbers.

Any help is very appreciated!

  • 3
    First mistake K&R is very old, don't read it for learning. Read it to learn the history of the language only. You have a very K&Rish mistake, main() must return int. – Iharob Al Asimi Jan 2 '16 at 17:24
  • do ./a.out < test.txt – BLUEPIXY Jan 2 '16 at 17:25
  • Can you run a "hello world" program? – n. 'pronouns' m. Jan 2 '16 at 17:25
  • 1
    Your program works fine for me. Are you pressing Ctrl-C instead of Ctrl-D when passing input from your shell? – Lynn Jan 2 '16 at 17:25
  • 2
    It just works fine. Type something and press ctrl+D. The meaning for the (c = getchar()) != EOF is it reads the characters you type and waits until you press ctrl+D and prints the character stats. – scarecrow Jan 2 '16 at 17:26
2

This program requires an input file to be passed to it, but it works as is.

 gcc test.c -o test
 echo "12345" > data
 ./test < data

 digits = 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0, white space = 1, other = 0

Here is another output:

 echo "111 111 222" > data
 ./test < data

 digits = 0 6 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0, white space = 3, other = 0
  • I copy pasted the OP's code into test.c then compiled and ran it. – Tony Ruth Jan 2 '16 at 17:29
  • Sorry, I read requires an input file and didn't see the ./test < data. Would you mention the incorrect main() signature please? – Iharob Al Asimi Jan 2 '16 at 17:30
0

The problem is, that you do not normally input EOF from the console. As stated in Tony Ruths answer, it works by redirecting a file to stdin of the program, because files are terminated by EOF. Since the entire file is then passed into stdin, which is read by the program via getch(), the "end of the input" gets recognized the correct way.

You just don't get to input EOF via the console, thus not getting any output. (actually there might be some special shortcut for EOF)

0

BTW, in the years since K&R came out, we have learned a lot about what makes code more reliable/maintainable. Some examples:

#include <stdio.h>

/* count digits, white space, others */

int main ( void ) {                 /* type explicitly */

        int c;                      /* declare 1 variable per line */
        int i;
        int nwhite     = 0;         /* initialize variables when possible */
        int nother     = 0;
        int ndigit[10] = {0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0};

        while ((c = getchar()) != EOF) {          /* use brackets */
                if ((c >= '0') && (c <= '9')) {   /* explicit precedence is clearer */
                        ++ndigit[c-'0'];
                } else if ((c == ' ') || (c == '\n') || (c == '\t')) {
                        ++nwhite;
                } else {
                        ++nother;
                }
        }
        printf("digits =");
        for (i = 0; i < 10; ++i) printf(" %d", ndigit[i]); /* 1 liner is ok w/{} */
        printf(", white space = %d, other = %d\n", nwhite, nother);
        return 0;                            /* don't forget a return value */
}
  • Wow, thank you for the examples. I was always told that K&R was a great way to learn C. By everyone's comments I'm starting to see that it's prehistoric for today's standards. I appreciate the help! – woodfordb Jan 2 '16 at 17:41
  • @woodfordb I think you've got yourself into a very unfortunate situation because of asking the question and you've started feeling this way now. IMHO you should definitely proceed with K&R and finish it. I never needed much of any outside material for learning C other than K&R. – scarecrow Jan 2 '16 at 18:16
  • @scarecrow I'm definitely going to continue with K&R. It still seems like it's one of the best ways to learn the C language. I'll just be looking more carefully at the problems in the book. Thanks for the insight. – woodfordb Jan 2 '16 at 18:33

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.