1

I'm trying to create a new array of objects from an existing array that I am looping through, but I only end up with the last value. I get why it's happening, just not sure what approach to take to get the desired result.

var existingThing = ["one","two","three"];

var thingtoAdd = {};

var newthing = [];

for (var i = 0; i < existingThing.length; i++) {

    thingtoAdd.key = existingThing[i];
    thingtoAdd.value = existingThing[i];
    thingtoAdd.selected = "true";
    newthing.push(thingtoAdd);
}

console.log(JSON.stringify(newthing));

I end up with:

[{"key":"three","value":"three","selected":"true"},
{"key":"three","value":"three","selected":"true"},
{"key":"three","value":"three","selected":"true"}]
5
  • 4
    thingtoAdd is declared outside of the loop. You need to put var thingtoAdd = {}; within the forloop.
    – Dave Chen
    Jan 3 '16 at 11:30
  • thingtoAdd is the same object, three times ?
    – adeneo
    Jan 3 '16 at 11:30
  • Why would you use a string value to represent what seems to be a boolean?
    – user663031
    Jan 3 '16 at 14:03
  • @torazaburo while I TOTALLY agree with your comment, the OP asked for help with why "newthing" ended up with three copies of "three", not a critique of code style/proper datatype usage. ;-) Jan 6 '16 at 17:09
  • @AndrewSteitz SO is full of comments that address peripheral issues. If the OP doesn't care he can ignore them.
    – user663031
    Jan 6 '16 at 17:18
7

Change your code to:

var existingThing = ["one","two","three"];

var newthing = [];

for (var i = 0; i < existingThing.length; i++) {

    var thingtoAdd = {};

    thingtoAdd.key = existingThing[i];
    thingtoAdd.value = existingThing[i];
    thingtoAdd.selected = "true";
    newthing.push(thingtoAdd);
}

console.log(JSON.stringify(newthing));

You are continously overriding the same object thingtoAdd because it exists on the outer loop scope. When you move it to the inner block of the loop, you add a new object on each iteration with the required value.

0

Empty the thingToAdd object after you push

for (var i = 0; i < existingThing.length; i++) {

    thingtoAdd.key = existingThing[i];
    thingtoAdd.value = existingThing[i];
    thingtoAdd.selected = "true";
    newthing.push(thingtoAdd);
    thingToAdd = {};
}
0
0

Each time you push the thing to add an object into the array newthing, you're pushing only the reference Of that object, "thingtoAdd", so when you update the object in the second or third iteration in your for loop you're updating the object itself, so the array which has the reference of the object is also updated every time, so the array will have two "thingtoAdd" objects with the same value or the last updated value of the object.

So emptying the object means you're creating an instance of the object every time. Place a debugger inside the for loop and check the "newthing" array you can find an answer.

var obj = { val: 5 }
function increment(obj) {
    obj.val++
}
increment(obj)

When you call the above function obj value, it will be incremented every time, but

function increment(val) {
   val++
}
val = 5
increment(val)
alert(val)

in the above case val will be the same. The difference is because in the first example obj is not changed, but the data which it references is modified instead, while in the second example variable val is changed.

-2
    var existingThing = ["one","two","three"];



var newthing = [];

for (var i = 0; i < existingThing.length; i++) {
    var thingtoAdd = {};
    thingtoAdd.key = existingThing[i];
    thingtoAdd.value = existingThing[i];
    thingtoAdd.selected = "true";
    newthing.push(thingtoAdd);
}

console.log(JSON.stringify(newthing));
2
  • 4
    An explanation, as this is not a complete answer: this works because in the original code you were always modifying the same object, as when you push thingtoAdd you don't push the actual object, but a reference to it and at every iteration you modify the exact same reference. By doing thingtoAdd = {}; you actually change the thingtoAdd variable to point to a new blank object so at the next iteration you modify this new object instead of the one in the array. Imagine thingtoAdd as being a cup in which an object is stored, at every loop you pour the cup in the array and re-fill it with{}
    – XCS
    Jan 3 '16 at 11:46
  • 4
    Why would you initialize thingtoAdd once before the loop and then at the end of each iteration, instead of just at the beginning of each iteration? Also, you point out what you changed and how it solved the problem.
    – user663031
    Jan 3 '16 at 14:04

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