7

So far I have just used unions to store either member A or member B.
I do now find myself in the case where I want to change the used member during runtime.

union NextGen {
    std::shared_ptr<TreeRecord> Child = nullptr;
    std::vector<std::shared_ptr<TreeRecord>> Children;
};

My current usage:

void TreeRecord::AddChild(const std::shared_ptr<TreeRecord>& NewChild) {
    if(_childCount == 0) {
        _nextGeneration.Child = NewChild;
        _childCount++;
    } else if(_childCount == 1) {
        //This is not clear to me:
        //Do I have to set Child to nullptr first?
        //Do I need to clear the Children vecor?
        //Or will it work like this?
        _nextGeneration.Children.push_back(_nextGeneration.Child);
        _nextGeneration.Children.push_back(NewChild);
        _childCount++;
    } else {
        _nextGeneration.Children.push_back(NewChild);
        _childCount++;
    }
}

New implementation (try):

typedef std::shared_ptr<TreeRecord> singlechild_type;
typedef std::vector<std::shared_ptr<TreeRecord>> children_type;



union {
    singlechild_type _child;
    children_type _children;
};



void TreeRecord::AddChild(const singlechild_type& NewChild) {
    if(_childCount == 0) {
        _child = NewChild;
        _childCount = 1;

    } else if(_childCount == 1) {
        singlechild_type currentChild = _child; //Copy pointer
        _child.~singlechild_type(); //Destruct old union member
        new (&_children) children_type(); //Construct new union member
        _children.push_back(currentChild); //Add old child to vector
        _children.push_back(NewChild); //Add new child to vector
        _childCount = 2;

    } else {
        _children.push_back(NewChild);
        _childCount++;
    }
}
2

You need a C++11 compliant compiler. Read about union-s.

In general, you need to explicitly call the destructor of the old union member, and then the constructor of the new union member. Actually, you'll better have tagged unions, with the actual union being anonymous and member of some class:

class TreeRecord;

class TreeRecord {
   bool hassinglechild;
   typedef std::shared_ptr<TreeRecord> singlechild_type;
   typedef std::vector<std::shared_ptr<TreeRecord>> children_type;
   union {
     singlechild_type child;  // when hassinglechild is true
     children_type children;  // when hassinglechild is false
   }
   TreeRecord() : hassinglechild(true), child(nullptr) {};
   void set_child(TreeRecord&ch) {
     if (!hassinglechild) {
       children.~children_type();
       hassinglechild = true;
       new (&child) singlechild_type(nullptr);
     };
     child = ch;
   }
   /// other constructors and destructors skipped
   /// more code needed, per rule of five
}

Notice that I am explicitly calling the destructor ~children_type() then I am using the placement new to explicitly call the constructor for child.

Don't forget to follow the rule of five. So you need more code above

See also boost::variant

BTW your code is suggesting that you distinguish the case when you have a child and the case when you have a one-element vector of children. Is that voluntary and meaningful?

PS. In some languages, notably Ocaml, tagged unions (a.k.a. sum types) are considerably easier to define and implement than in C++11.... See wikipage of algebraic data types.

7
  • Didn't even thought about that! What do you mean by "in general" Jan 3 '16 at 16:14
  • This is the correct answer, but it would be nice if you elaborate.
    – mostruash
    Jan 3 '16 at 16:15
  • I won't have a one elem vector. I either use Child for 0 or 1 elem and I switch to vector for more elems than 1. Or did I made a mistake...? (I am still reading your code) And I am using a tagged union, just not with a boolean identifier but with "size_t _childCount", which is 0 or 1 when Child is beeing used. Jan 3 '16 at 16:33
  • But the std::vector carries its own _childCount as its size(), so you just want a boolean flag Jan 3 '16 at 16:35
  • @LightnessRacesinOrblit: I just mentioned it, but what might be wrong with boost is the additional dependency it requires. Sometimes people dislike that (and I understand that opinion). Jan 3 '16 at 16:44
1

Note, using more than one element of a union concurrently invokes undefined behavior, e.g.

    _nextGeneration.Children.push_back(_nextGeneration.Child);

As @BasileStarynkevitch mentioned, one way is to avoid this is a tagged union.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.