5

I am trying to implement a general purpose file system crawler that would - for example - be able to enumerate all sub-folders starting at a given root. I would like to do that using the async/await/Task paradigm.

Below is my code so far. It works, but I suspect it can be improved. In particular, the annotated Task.WaitAll causes unnecessary waits in a deep directory tree, since the loop is suspended waiting at each tree level instead of immediately proceeding to tackle the new folders being added to the folderQueue.

Somehow I would like to include the new folders being added to the folderQueue in the list of tasks being waited on by Task.WaitAll() while the WaitAll is in progress. Is that even possible?

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.IO;
using System.Linq;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

class FileSystemCrawlerSO
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        FileSystemCrawlerSO crawler = new FileSystemCrawlerSO();
        Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();
        watch.Start();
        crawler.CollectFolders(@"d:\www");
        watch.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine($"Collected {crawler.NumFolders:N0} folders in {watch.ElapsedMilliseconds} milliseconds.");
        if (Debugger.IsAttached)
            Console.ReadKey();
    }


    public int NumFolders { get; set; }

    private readonly Queue<DirectoryInfo> folderQueue;


    public FileSystemCrawlerSO()
    {
        folderQueue = new Queue<DirectoryInfo>();
    }


    public void CollectFolders(string path)
    {
        DirectoryInfo directoryInfo = new DirectoryInfo(path);
        lock (folderQueue)
           folderQueue.Enqueue(directoryInfo);
        List<Task> tasks = new List<Task>();
        do
        {
            tasks.Clear();
            lock (folderQueue)
            {
                while (folderQueue.Any())
                {
                    var folder = folderQueue.Dequeue();
                    Task task = Task.Run(() => CrawlFolder(folder));
                    tasks.Add(task);
                }
            }
            if (tasks.Any())
            {
                Console.WriteLine($"Waiting for {tasks.Count} tasks...");
                Task.WaitAll(tasks.ToArray()); //<== NOTE: THIS IS NOT OPTIMAL
            }
        } while (tasks.Any());
    }


    private void CrawlFolder(DirectoryInfo dir)
    {
        try
        {
            DirectoryInfo[] directoryInfos = dir.GetDirectories();
            lock (folderQueue)
                foreach (DirectoryInfo childInfo in directoryInfos)
                    folderQueue.Enqueue(childInfo);
            // Do something with the current folder
            // e.g. Console.WriteLine($"{dir.FullName}");
            NumFolders++;
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            while (ex != null)
            {
                Console.WriteLine($"{ex.GetType()} {ex.Message}\n{ex.StackTrace}");
                ex = ex.InnerException;
            }
        }
    }
}
3
  • I am guessing you are trying to make the process of enumerating folders faster. Did you actually measure to see that you gained some performance? Please note that there is no real async API that enumerates folders or files (at least AFAIK). What you are doing is actually using more threads to synchronously enumerate folders, but these threads will spend most of the time waiting for the sync IO to finish. Commented Jan 3, 2016 at 18:26
  • @YacoubMassad Yes, faster is the goal here. I did actually measure the performance of my solution versus a naive, sequential, synchronous enumeration and it is definitely faster (although, counter-intuitively, only about 3x faster on a machine with 12 hyper-cores; I was expecting more improvement). What I am doing is actually enumerating folders in parallel - several tasks concurrently grabbing subfolders of a different folder each. I believe DirectoryInfo.GetDirectories can be executed in parallel on different folders (in NTFS at least).
    – Optimax
    Commented Jan 3, 2016 at 20:12
  • did you tried with high performance ? Commented Apr 25, 2017 at 8:18

3 Answers 3

17

In theory, async/await should be able to help here. In practice, not so much. This is because Win32 does not expose asynchronous APIs for directory functions (or certain file functions, such as opening a file).

Furthermore, parallelizing the disk access by using multiple threads (Task.Run) has a tendency to backfire, particularly with traditional (non-SSD) disks. Parallel file system access (as opposed to serial file system access) tends to cause disk thrashing, reducing overall throughput.

So, in the general case, I'd recommend just using the blocking directory enumeration methods. For example:

class FileSystemCrawlerSO
{
  static void Main(string[] args)
  {
    var numFolders = 0;
    Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();
    watch.Start();
    foreach (var dir in Directory.EnumerateDirectories(@"d:\www", "*", SearchOption.AllDirectories))
    {
      // Do something with the current folder
      // e.g. Console.WriteLine($"{dir.FullName}");
      ++numFolders;
    }
    watch.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine($"Collected {numFolders:N0} folders in {watch.ElapsedMilliseconds} milliseconds.");
    if (Debugger.IsAttached)
        Console.ReadKey();
  }
}

One nice side effect of doing it the simple way is that there is no longer a race condition on the folder counter variable (NumFolders).

For a Console app, that's all you need to do. If this is going to be put into a UI app and you don't want to block the UI thread, then a single Task.Run should suffice.

4
  • 1
    +1, obviously better solution. But note that if there is only one directory that you are not allowed to access, all the following won't be enumerated anymore. Trying to access directories you are not allowed to throws exceptions.
    – René Vogt
    Commented Jan 3, 2016 at 19:38
  • 3
    I am not so sure it is obviously a better solution as it suffers not only from the problem René identified (failing to enumarete anything after the first "unauthorized" error), but it also is 3x slower than my original solution in my tests.
    – Optimax
    Commented Jan 3, 2016 at 20:21
  • Valid point about the race condition, though. I am using Interlocked in my real code. My example was somewhat sloppy as a side-effect of trying to distill the problem to its simplest representation for SO. There is a lot more 'fluff' in my actual code, including more error handling, locking, and other protections. :-)
    – Optimax
    Commented Jan 3, 2016 at 20:26
  • I tried it too. For me its really slower solution and its find less folders that another ways. Maybe I did't something wrong but anyway it slower.
    – pavel
    Commented Oct 20, 2018 at 21:37
9

Separate crawling and processing

Try using Producer-Consumer pattern.
It's a way to crawl directories in one thread and process in the other thread.

Producer-Consumer pattern

public class Program
{
    private readonly BlockingCollection<DirectoryInfo> collection = new BlockingCollection<DirectoryInfo>();

    public void Run()
    {
        Task.Factory.StartNew(() => CollectFolders(@"d:\www"));

        foreach (var dir in collection.GetConsumingEnumerable())
        {
            // Do something with the current folder
            // e.g. Console.WriteLine($"{dir.FullName}");
        }
    }

    public void CollectFolders(string path)
    {
        try
        {
            foreach (var dir in new DirectoryInfo(path).EnumerateDirectories("*", SearchOption.AllDirectories))
            {
                collection.Add(dir);
            }
        }
        finally
        {
            collection.CompleteAdding();
        }
    }
}

More faster

If processing is slower than crawling, you may want to use Parallel.ForEach.

Producer-Parallel Consumer pattern

Parallel.ForEach(collection.GetConsumingEnumerable(), dir =>
{
    // Do something with the current folder
    // e.g. Console.WriteLine($"{dir.FullName}");
});
8

This is my suggestions. I use generic Concurrent*<> classes, so I don't have to take care of locks myself (though this does not automatically improve performance).

Then I start a task for every folder and enqueue in the ConcurrentBag<Task>. After starting the first task, I always wait for the first task in the bag and am finished if no more tasks are there to await.

public class FileSystemCrawlerSO
{
    public int NumFolders { get; set; }
    private readonly ConcurrentQueue<DirectoryInfo> folderQueue = new ConcurrentQueue<DirectoryInfo>();
    private readonly ConcurrentBag<Task> tasks = new ConcurrentBag<Task>();

    public void CollectFolders(string path)
    {

        DirectoryInfo directoryInfo = new DirectoryInfo(path);
        tasks.Add(Task.Run(() => CrawlFolder(directoryInfo)));

        Task taskToWaitFor;
        while (tasks.TryTake(out taskToWaitFor))
            taskToWaitFor.Wait();
    }


    private void CrawlFolder(DirectoryInfo dir)
    {
        try
        {
            DirectoryInfo[] directoryInfos = dir.GetDirectories();
            foreach (DirectoryInfo childInfo in directoryInfos)
            {
                // here may be dragons using enumeration variable as closure!!
                DirectoryInfo di = childInfo;
                tasks.Add(Task.Run(() => CrawlFolder(di)));
            }
            // Do something with the current folder
            // e.g. Console.WriteLine($"{dir.FullName}");
            NumFolders++;
        }
        catch(Exception ex)
        {
            while (ex != null)
            {
                Console.WriteLine($"{ex.GetType()} {ex.Message}\n{ex.StackTrace}");
                ex = ex.InnerException;
            }
        }
    }
}

I did not measure yet if this is faster than your solution. But I think (as Yacoub Massad) commented, that the bottle neck will rather be the IO system itself and not the way you organize your task.

2
  • 1
    Yes, your version is about 20% more efficient than mine (tested on a tree with 170+k folders) seeing that you avoid building a list of DirectoryInfos separate from the list of tasks, and taking advantage of the automatic locking of the Concurrent containers. I'll accept your answer. Thanks.
    – Optimax
    Commented Jan 3, 2016 at 21:07
  • 3
    BTW, you don't even need the folderQueue in your implementation. There is no list of directories separate from the bag of tasks needed.
    – Optimax
    Commented Jan 3, 2016 at 22:04

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