1

I'm working with an array like this one :

var table = [a: 'text_1', b: 'test_2'];

I need to display all the elements of this array with a single function or method but we must consider that 'a' and 'b' are characters or strings, not numbers.

That's why I can't use the array.forEach() method !

Any idea?

  • That's invalid, at least almost, you can do it, but arrays should have numbered indexes, and objects should have keys – adeneo Jan 3 '16 at 22:49
  • Array is something like ['a','b'], but in your case your variable is bad-written object, you should use var table = {a: 'text_1', b: 'test_2'} instead. – PDKnight Jan 3 '16 at 22:50
  • And if it is an object, you simply do for (var key in table) { ... – adeneo Jan 3 '16 at 22:51
  • Thank you guys, I will use an object! – TimothePearce Jan 3 '16 at 22:52
0

Your array declaration looks a little off. The code you've posted gives a syntax error.


If you want this to be an array, it should look something like this:

var table = ['text_1', 'test_2'];

You should be able to iterate through that with forEach:

table.forEach(function (entry) {
  // 'text_1', then 'test_2', etc...
});

If you want this to be an object with a string key, it should look something like this:

var table = {a: 'text_1', b: 'test_2'};

You can iterate through that like this:

// For every key in `table`...
var value;
for (var key in table) {

  // If the table has the key (and it isn't somewhere higher
  // up in the prototype chain...
  if (table.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
    value = table[key];

    // ...do something with `value`...
  }
}

You can also use the popular Underscore or Lodash libraries to accomplish this in a prettier way:

_.each(table, function (value, key) {
  // ...do something with `value` and `key`...
});
  • Thank you @Evan for this long answer , I learned lots of things. – TimothePearce Jan 3 '16 at 23:07
0

You want something more like this:

var table = {a: 'text_1', b: 'test_2'};
for(key in table){
    console.log(key); //logs a and b
    console.log(table[key]); //logs 'text_1' and 'test_2'
}

Your table is an object, not an array.

  • Thank you @JeremyJackson, I will use an object! – TimothePearce Jan 3 '16 at 22:58
0

The data structure you want is a plain object:

var table = {a: 'text_1', b: 'test_2'};

You can use a normal object iterator loop (for...in), or if you want to access all Array methods, you can iterate over the object keys (for example, if you want to filter):

Object.keys(table).filter(function(key) {
  console.log(table[key]);

  return table[key] !== 'text_1';
});
  • Thank you Josh for you answer, I will try this filter method you gave me! – TimothePearce Jan 3 '16 at 23:08
  • @TimothePearce filter has nothing to do with it, I was just showing an example of a use of a native Array method on a structure that is a plain object – Josh Beam Jan 4 '16 at 1:31
  • Yes I had understood, it works like a charm, thank you ;) – TimothePearce Jan 4 '16 at 13:54

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