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I'm looking to convert the MIN_SAFE_INTEGER through MAX_SAFE_INTEGER range of a JavaScript number (53-bits not including the sign) into a string of bits spread over 7 bytes shifted two to allow for sign and null identifiers.

Thus far the best I've come up with is:

function toUint8Array(data) {
    data = data.toString(2);
    data = new Array(65 - data.length).join('0') + data;
    var ret = new Uint8Array(data.length / 8);
    for (var i = 0; i < 8; i++) {
        ret[i] = 0;
        ret[i] += (data[i * 8] == '1' ? 128 : 0);
        ret[i] += (data[(i * 8) + 1] == '1' ? 64 : 0);
        ret[i] += (data[(i * 8) + 2] == '1' ? 32 : 0);
        ret[i] += (data[(i * 8) + 3] == '1' ? 16 : 0);
        ret[i] += (data[(i * 8) + 4] == '1' ? 8 : 0);
        ret[i] += (data[(i * 8) + 5] == '1' ? 4 : 0);
        ret[i] += (data[(i * 8) + 6] == '1' ? 2 : 0);
        ret[i] += (data[(i * 8) + 7] == '1' ? 1 : 0);
    }
    return (ret);
}

Fiddle

As you can tell right off, this would be abominably slow (and the bits still haven't been shifted two places across all 7 active bytes.)

Is there any way to do this faster? Ideally by avoiding the string parsing altogether?

  • Actually DataView, correctly used i.e. not how you've attempted it, can give a modest (3X in Firefox, 1.5X in Chrome, 7.5X in internet explorer) speed improvement - and I may be doing it sub-optimally – Jaromanda X Jan 4 '16 at 23:29
  • @JaromandaX I'd be curious to see how you are managing that to produce the output I'm attempting to get. – CoryG Jan 5 '16 at 0:19
  • I can make a fiddle, but ... the input is strictly limited to MIN_SAFE_INTEGER -> MAX_SAFE_INTEGER - one question ... should the sign/null bits be the LSB of the 7th byte or the MSB of the first byte? – Jaromanda X Jan 5 '16 at 1:14
  • @JaromandaX the sign bit is the 1 place of the first byte and the null bit is the 2 place of the first byte like in this fiddle that only goes to 32 bits. I'd actually be quite happy with the 53 bits allowed by MAX_SAFE_INTEGER as I'm using bignumber.js beyond that, I'd just really like to avoid doing string parsing for bits 33 though 53 if possible. – CoryG Jan 5 '16 at 1:22
5
+50

Bitwise ops in javascript are only 32 bits wide. But shifting is equivalent to multiplication or division by a power of two, and these happen with full floating-point precision.

So what you want to do is straightforward. Shift to get the interesting part in the low-order bits, and mask off the rest. E.g. you have a big number 0x123456789abc (20015998343868).

0x123456789abc / 0x1 = 0x123456789abc. Bitwise AND with 0xff gives 0xbc.

0x123456789abc / 0x100 = 0x123456789a.bc. Bitwise AND with 0xff gives 0x9a.

0x123456789abc / 0x10000 = 0x12345678.9abc. Bitwise AND with 0xff gives 0x78.

And so on. Code:

function toUint8Array(d) {
    var arr = new Uint8Array(7);
    for (var i=0, j=1; i<7; i++, j *= 0x100) {
        arr[i] = (d / j) & 0xff;
    }
    return arr;
}

With a Uint8Array life is even easier: the masking with 0xff is implicit as Uint8Arrays can only store integers between 0 and 255. But I've left it in for clarity, and so that the result will the same with different array types.

This code produces a little-endian array, e.g. toUint8Array(0x123456789abc) returns [0xbc,0x9a,0x78,0x56,0x34,0x12,0]. If you want big-endian, i.e. the bytes in the opposite order, replace arr[i] with arr[6-i].

(If you want the bits in each array entry in the opposite order this is slightly more complicated. Replace (d / j) & 0xff with bitrev((d / j) & 0xff), where bitrev looks something like this:

function bitrev(byte) {
   var table = [ 0b0000, 0b1000, 0b0100, 0b1100, 0b0010, 0b1010, 0b0110, 0b1110,
                 0b0001, 0b1001, 0b0101, 0b1101, 0b0011, 0b1011, 0b0111, 0b1111 ];
   return table[byte >> 4] + (table[byte & 0xf] << 4);
}

)

Finally, this only works on positive integers. But your shifting-by-two idea is easily implemented. d*4 is d shifted left by two bits. And d < 0 ? -d : d (or Math.abs(d)) is the absolute value of d. So arr = toUint8Array((d<0) ? 1-d*4 : d*4) returns d shifted left by two bits, with the sign bit in the least significant bit (LSB).

And you can check for not-numbers with isFinite(), but you have to be careful to call it only on numbers, as isFinite(null), say, is actually true due to implicit casting rules (this is fixed in ES6):

function toUint8Array_shifted_signed(d) {
   /* bit 0 is sign bit (0 for +ve); bit 1 is "not-a-number" */
   if (typeof d !== 'number' || !isFinite(d)) {
       d = 2; 
   } else {
       d = (d<0) ? 1-d*4 : d*4;
   }

   return toUint8Array(d);
}
  • wondering, is it faster? – Ross Jan 13 '16 at 1:48
  • Thanks this is great - one additional question - is there a quick way to do the 2-bit shift while preserving all 53 original integer bits? If you do the * 4 operation on a number greater than Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER / 4 things can come out incorrectly. – CoryG Jan 13 '16 at 3:24
  • 1
    * 4 is actually safe even for numbers greater than MAX_SAFE_INTEGER. Internally the mantissa is the same, the exponent is just incremented by two. MAX_SAFE_INTEGER doesn't mean that no integers above MAX_SAFE_INTEGER can be losslessly represented, only that there exist ones than cannot. But while the code as it stands is correct for all positive integers, 1-d*4 can result in precision loss for large negative integers. There's also no check for overflow when d>=2^56, and no guarding against d not being an integer (where d*4 can leak the fractional part into the lower 2 bits). – hexwab Jan 13 '16 at 8:58
  • 1
    I will update the answer for extra robustness in these cases. – hexwab Jan 13 '16 at 9:01
1

I hit the books, and a couple more math-side CS friends of mine, and our current verdict is that this can't be done as you're describing it.

I think you're stuck with the string-parsing.

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