8

I have spent 2 days bashing my head against this problem, and I can't seem to crack it (the problem that is). The same code was working fine until I added database relationships, and I have since read a lot about lazy-loading.

I have two database tables with a 1:1 relationship between them. PromoCode table tracks codes, and has a PK column named id. CustomerPromo table has a column PromoId which is linked to the PromoCode table id. These two tables have no other relationships. I generated all this in SQL Server Management Studio, then generated the model from the database.

To make matters slightly more complicated, I'm doing this inside a WCF data service, but I don't believe that should make a difference (it worked before database relationships were added). After enabling logging, I always get an Exception in the log file with text:

DataContext accessed after Dispose.

My function currently returns all entries from the table:

using (MsSqlDataContext db = new MsSqlDataContext())
{
    // This causes issues with lazy-loading
    return db.PromoCodes.ToArray();
}

I have read numerous articles/pages/answers and they all say to use the .Include() method. But this doesn't work for me:

return db.PromoCodes.Include(x => x.CustomerPromos).ToArray();

I've tried the "magic string" version as well:

return db.PromoCodes.Include("CustomerPromos").ToArray();

The only code I've managed to get to work is this:

PromoCode[] toReturn = db.PromoCodes.ToArray();

foreach (var p in toReturn)
    p.CustomerPromos.Load();

return toReturn;

I've tried added a .Where() criteria to the query, I've tried .Select(), I've tried moving the .Include() after the .Where() (this answer says to do it last, but I think that's only due to nested queries). I've read about scenarios where .Include() will silently fail, and after all this I'm no closer.

What am I missing? Syntax problem? Logic problem? Once I get this "simple" case working, I also need to have nested Includes (i.e. if CustomerPromo table had a relationship to Customer).

Edit
Including all relevant code. The rest is either LINQ to SQL, or WCF Data Services configuration. This is all there is:

[WebGet]
[OperationContract]
public PromoCode[] Test()
{
    using (MsSqlDataContext db = new MsSqlDataContext())
    {
        return db.PromoCodes.Include(x => x.CustomerPromos).ToArray();
    }
}

If I call that through a browser directly (e.g. http://<address>:<port>/DataService.svc/Test) I get a reset connection message and have to look up the WCF logs to find out "DataContext accessed after Dispose.". If I make the same query through an AJAX call in a webpage I get an AJAX error with status error (that's all!).

14
  • Can you shared the code fragment that throws the actual exception? Based on what you have above, this would happen after you've returned the list of PromoCodes and are then doing something with them. Jan 4, 2016 at 2:37
  • If that's the case then it's because it's in a WCF data service. It's being converted to JSON. There is a massive exception stack trace in the log file, but the only recognisable part is WriteArrayOfPromoCodeToJson, WritePromoCodeToJson, WriteArrayOfCustomerPromoToJson.
    – Ian
    Jan 4, 2016 at 2:40
  • only thing that comes to mind with what you shared so far is that you are trying to use your datacontext outside of your Using block.
    – Niklas
    Jan 4, 2016 at 2:40
  • Just from reading your error I would suggest instead of returning inside of your using (MsSqlDataContext db) to create an array variable, assign to it and call ToArray(), leave the using context, and then return. Does that change anything?
    – wentimo
    Jan 4, 2016 at 2:41
  • 1
    @Ian this might be helpful link
    – Niklas
    Jan 4, 2016 at 3:52

2 Answers 2

10

I prematurely posted the previous answer when I didn't actually have any child data to fetch. At the time I was only interested in fetching parent data, and that answer worked.

Now when I actually need child data as well I find it didn't work completely. I found this article which indicates that .Include() (he says Including() but I'm not sure if that's a typo) has been removed, and the correct solution is to use DataLoadOptions. In addition, I also needed to enable Unidirectional Serialisation.

And to top it off, I no longer need DeferredLoadingEnabled. So now the final code looks like this:

using (MsSqlDataContext db = new MsSqlDataContext())
{
    DataLoadOptions options = new DataLoadOptions();
    options.LoadWith<PromoCode>(p => p.CustomerPromos);
    db.LoadOptions = options;

    return db.PromoCodes.ToArray();
}

After setting Unidirectional Serialisation it will happily return a parent object without having to load the child, or explicitly set DeferredLoadingEnabled = false;.

1

Edit: This did not solve the problem entirely. At the time of testing there wasn't any child data, and I wasn't trying to use it. This only allowed me to return the parent object, it doesn't return child objects. For the full solution see this answer.

Contrary to everything I've read, the answer is not to use .Include() but rather to change the context options.

using (MsSqlDataContext db = new MsSqlDataContext())
{
    db.DeferredLoadingEnabled = false; // THIS makes all the difference
    return db.PromoCodes.ToArray();
}

This link posted in the question comments (thanks @Virgil) hint at the answer. However I couldn't find a way to access LazyLoadingEnabled for LINQ to SQL (I suspect it's for EntityFramework instead). This page indicated that the solution for LINQ to SQL was DeferredLoadingEnabled.

Here is a link to the MSDN documentation on DeferredLoadingEnabled.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.