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I've read various articles about mocking vs stubbing in testing, including Martin Fowler's Mocks Aren't Stubs, but still don't understand the difference.

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    @OP Because there is no difference. This article, as much as loved by the community, is - with all due respect - making everything unnecessary confusing by adding additional meaning to words that are easy to understand otherwise and by making things unnecessary complicated. Mock is just a mock, something that runs fake business logic instead of real one. Checking for behavior in the end is your choice, but it is still a mock. Or whatever you want to call it, but make it ONE. Do not split a hairs. Keep it simple, so people can understand your concept easily - which above article does fail with. – wst Jun 29 '16 at 2:30
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    "Classification between mocks, fakes, and stubs is highly inconsistent across the literature." With many citations. Still one of my favorite Wikipedia quotes - if such a thing exists :) en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mock_object – JD. Sep 22 '16 at 15:47
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    that Martin Fowler's article is really hard to understand for beginners. – lmiguelvargasf Nov 24 '16 at 15:03
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    The way i understand it is that a stub would just be a throw away object for your test, like a collection of dummy data. A Mock would be a cleverly overridden version of something more complex, like a service layer with various methods, which you might have changed the behavior of, for your tests. The two things are used together, like you could pass some stubbed objects into your mocked layer. – JsonStatham Mar 5 at 13:30

34 Answers 34

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Stubs are used on methods with an expected return value which you setup in your test. Mocks are used on void methods which are verified in the Assert that they are called.

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Mock - A mock intercepts a call to a method or function (or a group of methods and functions like in the case of a mocked class). It is not an alternative to that method or function. In that interception, the mock can do whatever it wants, such as record the input and output, decide to short circuit the call, change the returned value, etc.

Stub - A stub is a valid full working implementation of a method or function (or group of methods and functions like in the case of a stubbed class) that has an identical interface/signature to the method, function or group of methods and functions it is stubbing for. The stubbed implementation will generally only do things that are acceptable within the context of a unit test, that means it won't do IO for example, while mimicking the behavior of the thing it is stubbing.

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A test subject performs actions in response to certain prompts (function calls) or other stimuli. Here are concrete examples of test situations.

Scenario -- EMT student exam

A student has studied to be an Emergency Medical Technician. Go watch Ian Gallagher in Shameless Season 6, Episode 10 if you are unfamiliar with this test situation.

It is too expensive to find patients with various illnesses for test purposes. Instead we use actors. We ask the test subject (Ian) "you arrive on the scene and the patient is immobilized and unconscious what do you do first?" Ian responds "I check if the scene is safe". And the test instructor says "the scene is safe".

The instructor (and actor) are able to inject arbitrary answers to the test subject's queries.

Here, the instructor (and actor) are a mock. Medical training uses this terminology (e.g. mock code simulation) the same as computer scientists.

Scenario -- register for a website

You are testing Yahoo, a new email service you heard about. In order to sign up, you must provide your birthday and answers to other intrusive questions.

The website requires that you are 21 years or older. So you enter in the value January 1, 1970. It meets the requirements and it saves you from the laborious process of implementing a remember-my-birthday-and-type-it-in workflow.

This date is a stub. This word usage is specific to computer science.

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Say you have a class named EmployeeService that you want to test and that has one dependency on an interface named EmployeeDao:

public class EmployeeService{
   private EmployeeDao dao;
   public EmployeeService(Dao dao){this.dao = dao;}

   public String getEmployeeName(int id){
     Employee emp = bar.goToDatabaseAndBringTheEmployeeWithId(id);
     return emp != null?emp.getFullName:null;
   }
   //Further state and behavior
}

public interface EmployeeDao{
  Employee goToDatabaseAndBringTheEmployeeWithId(int id);
}

Inside your test class:

public class EmployeeServiceTest{
   EmployeeService service;
   EmployeeDao mockDao = Mockito.mock(EmployeeDao.class);//Line 3

   @Before
   public void setUp(){
     service = new EmployeeService(mockDao);
   }
   //Tests
   //....
}

In the above test class in line 3, we say to the mocking framework (in this case Mockito) "Hey, Mockito, craft me an object that has the EmployeeDao functionality." The framework is going to create an object that has the method goToDatabaseAndBringTheEmployeeWithId but actually with no body. It's your job to instruct that mock what to do. This is a mock.

But you could also create a class that implements the EmployeeDao interface and use it in the test class instead:

public EmployeeDaoStub implements EmployeeDao{
   public Employee goToDatabaseAndBringTheEmployeeWithId(int id){
      //No trip to DB, just returning a dummy Employee object
      return new Employee("John","Woo","123 Lincoln str");
   }
}

Inside your test class this time using stub instead of a mock:

public class EmployeeServiceTest{
   EmployeeService service;
   EmployeeDao daoStub = new EmployeeDaoStub();//Line 3

   @Before
   public void setUp(){
     service = new EmployeeService(daoStub);
   }
   //Tests
   //....
}

So to wrap it all, stubs are the classes that you create(or somebody else does) specifically to imitate some dependency just for the sake of having the desired state. Yes, as all the other people state, it's mostly about a state Whereas mocks are typically created by a mocking framework and you have no idea what its guts look like. But with stubs you know what class you're going to get: It's the one you created.

Oh, btw, if your dependency is a class rather than an interface, you can just extend that class to create your stub.

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